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Five Sections — 96 




FEBRUARY 25 - MARCH 2, 2000 



A Lakeland Newspaper /75 cents 



Burke resigns as su 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Staff Reporter 



Daniel L Burke will be leaving 
Antioch Community Consolidated 
School District 34 at the conclusion 
of Burke's contract this summer. 

Burke informed the board of 
education he will be leaving at the 



conclusion of his employment 
contract, effective June 30. 

According to a letter of resigna- 
tion dated Feb. is, Burke intends to 
pursue new professional challenges 
available to him elsewhere. 

Burke expressed his apprecia- 
tion to the board for the opportune 
ty to serve the students, citizens of 




the district and the board members, 
extending his best wishes to them 
all. 

In a press release, the board 
likewise extended its appreciation to 
Burke for the job which he has done 
and extended its best wishes to 
Burke with respect to his future 
endeavors. 




Antioch Upper Grade School eighth-grader Katy Baird shares some of her thoughts and feelings 
during a small group session with the school's Snowflake program at Camp Hastings YMCA in Linden- 
hurst Feb. 21.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 




pressure 



Students make friends, learn healthy 
alternatives at Operation Snowflake 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Staff Reporter 



Presidents' Day- a day off of 
school for sleeping in and 
playing video games. 
Not for Antioch Upper 
Grade School (AUGS) students 
choosing to participate in Operation 
Snowflake. 

For the seventh-grade students, 
the day was spent making new 
friends'and learning positive alter- 
natives to various challenges which 
middle school students face. 

"You kind of see how to treat an 
outcast, how to be nice to them and 
don't be mean," said Ryan Church, 
a 13-year-old AUGS seventh-grader 
attending his first Snowflake. 
"There's a lot of good, respectful 
people here." 

"We're really getting taught to 
go to someone's level, to know what 
their life's like and to not treat them 
poorly," Church explained. 

High school volunteers make 
Snowflake possible. 

Jordan Nobler, a 17-year-old 
Antioch Community High School 
(ACHS) junior serving his second 



year as a group leader, noted the big 
theme of this yearns event is "break- 
ing down the walls of prejudice." 

'Tfiere'sa lot of not normal 

things you do whereyou 

dress up, yell goofy things 

and be able to be yourself 

without having people 

ridiculeyou* 

Clint Ludden, 

ACHS senior, 

Snowflake volunteer 

"You want to try and give people 
equal chances," Nobler explained. 
Factors he sees involved in his small 
group are prejudicial beliefs on 
alcoholism and homelessness. 

Working to help'people see how 
their beliefs can affect the way they 
react to others is something Nobler 
hopes will be achieved during the 
day's activities. 

"Every year you get a new 
group which presents a challenge 
of how the group interacts within 



itself," Nobler explained. "No 
matter how much you plan ahead, 
you have to go with the flow and . 
see how it goes with the people in 
your group." 

"You make a lot of new friends," 
said Nobler, who went through 
Snowflake when he was in seventh 
grade at AUGS. "You meet people 
who share their decisions and 
choices as to how to live your life 
and people who are willing to share 
that with others." 

The high school offers a similar 
program called Snowball. 

Advice Nobler would give to 
. high school students considering 
being leaders or participating in 
Snowball is, "Give it a shot. It's a lot 
offun." 

"It's a great reinforcement if you 
choose to have a healthy lifestyle," 
Nobler added. 

Clint Ludden, an 18-year-old . 
ACHS senior, has been involved in 
Snowflake since he was in seventh 
grade at AUGS. 

"I haven't missed a year since," 
Ludden said, noting this marks his 

Please see SNOWFLAKE IA4 




remains challenged 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
taff Reporter 



The future of trains being 
required to sound their horns at all 
crossings is still uncertain. 

Antioch Mayor Marilyn Shine- 
flug updated the village board Feb. 
21 on the information compiled by 
the Northwest Municipal Confer- 
ence, of which Antioch is a member. 

Citing a 60 percent reduction 
from 1988 to 1997 in at-grade cross- 
ing accidents from 164 to 67, Mark 
W. Damisch, conference president, 
noted the dramatic drop came 



I 



despite traffic volumes increasing. 

The decline occurred despite a 
ill-fated law requiring whistle sound- 
ings, which was repealed two days 
later due to the outcry of public 
protest 

The train homs being sounded 
at this time are at a lower decibel 
level, according to Shineflug. The 
proposed law would allow horns to 
be sounded between 104-111 
decibels, which is reportedly above 
the current level. 

The packet of information 

Please see TRAINS /A4 



Homer White farm PUD 
public hearing scheduled 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Staff Reporter 



A public hearing is planned 
regarding the 643-acre former: 
Homer White farm property. 

The hearing is scheduled for 7-30 
p.m. Thursday, March 2 at the 
Maplethorpe Room in the Commu- 
nity Building, 884 Main St, . in 
Antioch. 

At that time, a request from 
Neumann Homes to have the 
Antioch Combined Planning 
Commission and Zoning Board 
consider a planned unit development 



(PUD) is to come before the board. 

According to a 1992 Lake County 
Circuit Court ordered settlement 
agreement, the property owners are 
legally entitled to develop a 
maximum of 1390 units including 
173 which may be multiple family 
residences. 

The proposed PUD includes 
1,203 single family homes and 166 
single family itownhomes. 

Copies of the proposal are avail- 
able for public viewing at the Antioch 
village clerk's office, located within 
the village hall, or at the Antioch 
Public Library. 




I \kt. cnii,vn iMttuiiass 2 



Readers will find a special treat 
in this edition of their favorite 
weekly newspaper— our sixth 
annual issue of Forefronts. It is 
a special insert section featuring people 
much like yourselves who have made a 
difference in our collective community 
in the past year. 

The 10 people featured this year 
make up a collage of culture, 
backgrounds and careers. Some are 
politicians, some are professionals and 
some are activists. 

In Forefronts you'll read the story 
behind their stories, what makes them who they are today. You'll read 
about a man who mobilized dozens of people in his effort to stop a 
blind federal political machine from ending desperately needed 
services in Lake County. You'll read about a man who grew up on an 
Indiana farm and took an interest in finance and people to become 
involved in bank management and various board and political 
positions in his community. And you'll read about a tireless woman 
known as "Grandma" to almost everyone who knows her, both young 
and old. Whether you agree or disagree with the passion of some of 
our feature choices, we hope at least you'll be Inspired by them. 

Vie Editors 




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COMMUNITY 




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Lakeland Newspapers/ A3 



Volunteers made dance successful 



By MICHAa H. BABICZ 
Staff Reporter 



■mSb' 









Jerry Bergstrom of Antioch shares a dance with his daughter Jen- 
nifer, 8, during the Daddy- Daughter Date Night at Antioch Upper 
Grade School Feb. 19. — Photo by Candace H. Johnson 



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A combination of community 
organizations serving as volunteers 
helped produce a successful fa- 
ther/daughter date night 

The Antioch Parks & Recreation 
Department's major winter event 
drew 700 in attendance Feb. 19 at 
Antioch Upper Grade School 
(AUGS). 

"I'm glad the snow came 24 
hours earlier," said Laurie Stahl, 
parks and recreation director. 

Stahl expressed her appreciation 
to members of the Antioch Commu- 
nity High School (ACHS),National 
Honor Society and the AUGS Na- 
tional Junior Honor Society for their 
assistance. 

Members of the two groups 
helped with decorations and serving. 

"I couldn't have done it without 
them," Stahl added. "Everything 
went well." 



Stahl expressed appreciation 
to AUGS staff for their assistance 
and allowing use of their facili- 
ties. 

Antioch Floral assisted with cor- 

'I couldn't have 

done it 

without them.,.. 

Everything 

went well' 

The Volunteers 



sages which were presented to each 
of the girls in attendance. Walgreen's 
of Antioch helped out with Polaroid 
film which was used in providing 
each group with a complimentary 
photo. 

The Dancin' Machine staff, es- 
pecially disc jockey Dave Gronke, 
was commended for doing a great 



job as usual, according to Stahl. 

The decision to reduce from 750 
attendees, which was last year's, to 
700 this year proved a good move, 
Stahl explained. 

• "The extra 50 people did make a 
difference," Stahl said. 

Plans are to continue with the 
700 maximum attendance for 2001, 
With ticket sates to begin next Janu- 
ary. 

The next major events scheduled 
for the park district begin with sum- 
mer day camp registration. For Anti- 
och residents only, registration will 
be held 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Saturday, 
April 8. For non-residents, registra- 
tion will be Held 9 a,m.-5 p.m. Mon- 
day, April 10. 

Plans are underway for the tradi- 
tional Easter Egg hunt and parade on 
Saturday, April 15. 

Stahl reports staff is working on 
the spring and summer activities 
program guide which will be distrib- 
uted in mid-March. 



Lindenhurst resident wins over $1.75 million, breaks TV record 



By BRENDA BEfTSCHER 
Staff Reporter 



"We won't have to fly coach any- 
more!" exclaimed Amy Legler, when 
she heard that her husband LL David 
Legler had ended a three-day run on 
NBC-TVs "Twenty-One" winning a 
total of $1,765,000 in cash. The prize 
was the largest ever awarded in tele- 
vision game show history. "Actually," 
the Lindenhurst resident explained, 
"my very first words were 'You've got 
to be kidding me!' I thought David 
might be pulling my leg, until his fa- 
ther confirmed it" 

David Legler phoned his wife 
from Los Angeles, following'lhe Feb. 
5 taping of the show that aired Feb. 
16. At the end of the show, host Mau- 
ry Povich displayed a large pile of 
currency, representing the total win- 
nings. "Right after the show, they 
wheel the cash backstage," Legler re- 
counted. "It gets loaded into a Brinks 
truck, and taken away." The actual 
prize money, in lump sum after tax- 
es, will arrive by check or wire trans- 
fer in about 90 days. 

Legler, originally from the Quad 
Cities area, has lived in Lindenhurst 
for about a year. He and his wife have 
no plans to move from their home in 
the Heritage Trails subdivision. "We 
were already thinking of adding a 
deck and a pool this summer. Now 
we can," he declared. The couple 
plans a summer trip to France, as 
well. 

"I was going to work this sum- 
mer, for extra money," said Amy 
Legler, a special education teacher. 
"Now I don't have to." Nevertheless, 
there are no immediate plans for her 



to permanently stop teaching. 

David Legler, who is a recruiting 
■ officer at Great Lakes Naval Training 
Center in North Chicago, is commit- 
ted to remaining with the Navy until 
November. "I was planning to leave 
to finish my MBA at the University of 
Chicago," he said. He acknowledged 
that the finance courses on his agen- 
da will help him decide what to do 
with his windfall. 

Legler wore his Navy uniform 
throughout the taping of the shows. 
"The contestants originally were 
picked by a popular vote from the 
audience, and I admit, I did think the 
uniform might help," he smiled. "It* 
turned out that, on my first day 
there, they changed to choosing the 
contestants randomly. Still, the show 
wanted me to wear it, the Navy want- 
ed me to wear it, and I wanted to 
wear it, so I did." 

"I never expected to go as far as I 
did," Legler said. "I just wanted to get 
on the show, maybe win a round, 
and not embarrass myself." The 29- 
year-old Naval officer did better than 
that, missing very few questions 
along the way to his final win. Ironi- 
cally, two of the questions missed in- 
volved the military. One was a bonus 
question which asked "True or false? 
The M60 is a tank," The lieutenant 
recalled, "I was thinking of the M60 
machine gun, so I said it was false. I 
think the question was confusingly 
worded." 

Legler also missed a question 
about military involvement in 
Bosnia "My first impulse was to say, 
'Bosnia,' but I wasn't sure, so I asked 
my father. I had total faith in his an- 
swer, so when he said, 'Iraq,' I just 



went with It." 

As a teen, Legler and his father 
watched "Jeopardy" on television 
and played along with the show. 
When the time came to choose an 
advisor (called a "second chance" in 
the parlance of the game) his father, 
whose name is also David, was the 
natural choice. 

"I knew he'd be helpful, particu- 
larly in the area of current events and 
scandals. He knows a lot about those 
areas," Legler explained. 

His father came to his rescue of- 
ten during the game, beginning ear- 
ly on, helping Legler answer a ques- 
tion about Los Angeles: "What land- 
mark had to be rebuilt in 1978 after 
the earthquake?" (It was the "Holly- 
wood" sign.) 

Other questions missed includ- 
ed one on culinary terms and one on 
Teletubbies. "I knew there was Tin- 
ky-Winky and La-la, but I didn't re- 
member Dipsy," Legler recalled. 

Legler prepared for the game by 
reading almanacs and gathering in- 
formation from the Internet. The 
questions are generated randomly, 
making it impossible to pinpoint an 
area of study beforehand. "Security 
(about the questions) is pretty tight," 
he said. "After the scandal on the old 
'Twenty-One' in the 1950s the pro- 
ducers want to make sure there is no 
hint of anything improper." As in the 
old show, contestants stand in "iso- 
lation booths" on stage, not hearing 
the questions until it is their turn to 
answer. 

Legler did not reveal how well he 




Lt. David Legler sits with his wife, Amy, in their Lindenhurst home 



jrst 
me 



after winning over $1.7 million on the national game show 
"Twenty-one,"'making him the winningest game show contestant 
on record.— Photo by Kirsten N. Hough I 



did to anyone but his parents and his 
wife. Other members of the family, 
and some friends, gathered at his 
home on Feb. 16 when the new win- 
ner's final appearance aired. Neigh- 
bor Debra Szuch, who was present, 
said her first question was, "You're 
not going to leave us now, are you?" 
Szuch was relieved to hear that the 
Leglers plan on staying in Linden- 
hurst. Szuch noted that the only ap- 



parent change she saw in the lucky 
couple is that they have less stress in 
their lives now. "And we'll all get to 
enjoy their new deck this summer," 
she laughed. 

"It couldn't happen to nicer peo- 
ple," said Szuch. "I always wondered 
if game show winners were real peor 
pie or just actors. Now I know that 
they are real, and that, in this case, 
they are great people, too." 



INDEX 



Chamber brings 'knights' to life 



AutoMarteL.Sec 


Editorial C4 


Hot Spots B6 




Forefronts...lnsert 


Wd'sKomer..Bii 


Classified ....CIS 


Healthwatch .. C9 


Lakeiife Bl 




Home/Gardcn..B9 . . 




Crossword B3 


Horoscope .... B3 


Obituaries ... C12 




GET CONNECTED 




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Antioch News 

Vol. 115 No. 8 A Lakeland Newspaper Founded 1886 



Marnbarol ItinoU Praaa Auoc. 

Look for u$ on the Internet at 
WWW.LPNEWS.COM 



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(847)223-8161 

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Ftilmaalar Sand addrau changaa to Anilodi Na*». 30 Soutti Whilnay Stnwt, P.O. Box 286. GrayaUka, IHinol* 60030. 

M.R. SCHROEDER WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

Founder-1 904-1 988 Publisher 

NEAL TUCKER 

Operations Manager 

ROBERT J. SCHROEDER DAVID'T. SHERMAN LINDA SHIPMAN 

General Sales Manager Advertising/Marketing Manager Public natations Manager 



CRYSTAL REED 

Classified Manager 



ROBERT WARDE 

Managing Ediior 



JO DAVIS 

Accounting Manager •< 



onderiftherewillbe 
any horses in the An- 
tioch VFW Hall Satur- 
day, Feb. 26. 

There are certain to be plenty of 
knights. 

Medieval Knights come alive 
beginning at 7 p.m. Saturday. In- 
cluded in the evening will be a 
catered "hands on" dinner in tradi- 
tional medieval banquet style. 

A sports tournament including 
various celebrities from throughout 
the kingdom is planned. 

Dancing to 6BI is planned. 

Period costumes are optional, 
but encouraged if you so desire. 

Admission for this most enjoy- 
able evening is a mere $15 per per- 
son. The Chamber of Commerce, 
which is collecting all of the "taxes" 
for the evening, prefers tickets be 
purchased in advance due to hav- 
ing to make sure there is plenty of 
food available. 

For those desiring a trip to an- 
other kingdom, a Disney World raf- 
fle for a five-day vacation for a fami- 




OUR 
TOWN 

Michael KBabicz 



bonus at no extra charge. The mare 
is expecting a foal. 

According to Rotary sources, 
Ted is waiting somewhat impatient- 
ly for the day to arrive. ' 

Wonder if they'll name the new 
arrival "Mr. Ted." 



ly of four including air fare, hotel 
and park admission will be held at 
some point during the evening. 

Disney World raffle tickets are 
$10 each or three for $20. Winner 
does not have to be present at the 
dinner. 

For further Information on Me- 
dieval Knights or the Disney raffle, 
contact the Chamber at 395-2233. 



Sorry to hear of the passing of a 
mainstay from the old "Antioch 
News" days. 

Russell Fairchild passed away 
Feb. 20 at age 89. 

Many longtime readers of the 
"Antioch News" may remember his 
always thoughtful Christmas holi- 
day column entitled "A Stroll with 
Russ Fairchild." 

May Russ rest in peace while 
the many smiles his column 
brought beam on. 



Anybody got some extra oats? 

Word from Antioch Rotary Club 
members is Ted and Vicki Axton are 
expecting 1 .! 

That's right. Seems like a horse 
which they purchased came with a 



If you have interesting informa- 
tion or anecdotes to submit for "Our 
Town" call staff reporter Mike 
Babicz at 223-8161, ext. 138 ore- 
mail, edit @lndcom" 



■ .<-:■ . (i 









A4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 25, 2000 



ACHS board maintains stance on developer donation 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Staff Reporter 



The Antioch Community High 
School District (ACHS) 117 Board of 
Education agreed to deny a request 
for the Tiffany Rd. senior citizen pro- 
ject development asking to waive de- 



veloper donation fees at its Feb. 17 
meeting. 

A similar request from a devel- 
oper in Lake Villa was denied within 
the past few months according to 
William Ahlers, ACHS business man- 



ager. 



Such a waiver would not be 



viewed as fair to those senior citizens 
who are still living in their own 
homes and have paid the developer 
donation fee. 

ACHS received notification of a 
tax assessment appeal from the own- 
ers of Oak Ridge Ct. apartment com- 
plex. The Antioch Elementary 



VOICES 2000 addresses teen issues 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Staff Reporter 



VOICES 2000, a very interesting 
and challenging Reader's Theatre 
presentation by Peter Dee, will be 
given at the PM&L Theatre, 877 
Main St., Antioch, at 2:30 p.m. Sun- 
day, Feb. 27. 

The performance is directed by 
Barbara Conkrite from Fox Lake. 
No reservations are necessary. The 



performances are free to the public. 

Four talented teenagers are the 
performers in VOICES 2000. The 
subject matter is teen issues as they 
are entering the 21st century. The 
performance and topic is expected 
to be of special interest to teens, 
parents and grandparents. 

The language is spirited and 
sometimes strong as these teens 
perform a series of skits dealing 
with subjects of drug abuse, teen 



pregnancy and other contempo- 
rary teen problems. 

The actors are Jessica Smouse, 
Bridget Heffeman, Joie Guffrey and 
Mike Anderson from Antioch. 

Two American sign language 
students from Harper College will 
interpret the performance for 
hearing impaired audience mem- 
bers. 

For more information, phone 
587-7204. 




COLUMBIA COLLEGE 



SERVING THE LAKE COUNTY AREA SINCE 1974. 



Associate and Bachelor's degrees 

Evening and weekend classes 

Eight-week sessions 

Affordable tuition 

Financial aid available to qualified students 

Conveniently located just off Route 41 

Accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools 



NEXT SESSION STARTS MAJRCH 19TH. 



SESSIONS START IN JANUARY, MARCH, JUNE, AUGUST & OCTOBER. 



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School District 34 Board of Educa- 
tion asked the high school board to 
join in opposing a reduction in the 
assessment. 

The ACHS passed a resolution 
joining the elementary school board 
in its opposition. 

In other board action, authoriza- 
tion was granted for the removal of 
asbestos floor tiles in two class- 
rooms. The work will be completed 



during the school's spring break. 

The board approved a proposal 
by an individual for removal of a 
barn located on the new ACHS prop- 
erty at Deep Lake and Grass Lake 
Rds. The proposal is contingent with 
the individual providing proof of ad- 
equate insurance coverage. 

The graduation date for the class 
of 2000 has been set for Wednesday, 
May31. 



FROM PAGE Al 




Brian Richards and Jacquelyn Magiera, eighth graders at Antioch 
Upper Grade School, participate in a thinking game Feb. 21 dur- 
ing the schooI's.Snowflake program at Camp Hastings YMCA in 
Lindenhurst.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



SNOWFLAKE 



third year with 
AUGSandifhe 
'leads at the Lake 
Villa School's 
event, it will be 
his fourth year 
there. 

"There's real- 
ly a large amount 
of things which can make some- 
one want to do this," Ludden ad- 
mits. "Everyone is a volunteer and 
they put themselves at risk." 

"There's a lot of not normal 
things you do where you dress up, 
yell goofy things and be able to be 
yourself without having people 
ridicule you," Ludden explained. 

"The stuff you learn about oth- 
er people in Snowflake allows peo- 
ple to speak out," Ludden said. 
"You make more friends. Friend- 
ships tend to carry on longer than 
one day of Snowflake or Snow- 
ball." 

Although displaying solid lead- 



Ifs a great reinforcement ership skills, Lud- 
ifyou choose to have a 
healthy lifestyle' ' 



Jordan Nobler, 

1 7-year-old ACHS junior, 

Snow/lake volunteer leader 



Snowball pro- 
gram at ACHS as 
a participant. 
"I put so much 
time and effort 
into the younger 
kids' programs, I 
like to be a participant (at Snow- 
ball),'* Ludden said, "You get a dif- 
ferent view, feeling and reactions as 
a participant," 

Church, whose brother, Dan, is 
an ACHS sophomore and encour- 
aged him to attend Snowflake, said 
of the experience, "It's such a great 
time. Everybody should go, but it's 
your own decision." 

"My brother encouraged me 
that it is a great way to be with 
friends, make friends and not waste 
the day," Ryan Church said. "It's a 
great way to have a day where you 
can learn about other people and 
earn their respect." 



TRAINS 



submitted to village board members 
for review allows them time to decide 
if Antioch, as a village, wants to get 
involved in attempting to get the leg- 
islation changed. 

The deadline for comments is 
May. 

Shineflug encouraged trustees 
and staff to review the material and 
raise any questions or concerns to 
her so that she might be able to ob- 
tain answers through the conference. 

In other board action, two ordi- 
nance first readings were made by 
Ken Clark, village attorney. 

The First regards a change in the 
language of the ordinance governing 
any developments which come di- 
rectly to the village board for annex- 
ation instead of going through the 
planning and zoning board. 

The change is necessitated due 
to an alteration in the state law no 
longer allowing the parcels to come 
in under agricultural zoning. Tim 
Wells, village administrator, ex- 
plained the ordinance is required to 
include the lowest density use as a 
primary residential zoning. In the 
case of Antioch, the change has 



parcels coming in at E-l zoning. 

Clark points out the property 
owner or developer still has the op- 
tion of going before the zoning 
board with specific plans for the 
land. The change in the wording of 
the ordinance brings the village into 
compliance with the state statute 
and allows for compliance should a 
land owner wish to annex without 
any set plans. 

The second ordinance repeals 
the previously passed ordinance in 
which the village was going to issue 
waterworks and sewage revenue 
bonds for the east facility planning 
area of the village. 

This ordinance is necessitated 
by the petition which challenged the 
issuance of the bonds instead asking 
for the question to go through a ref- 
erendum. Since one of the property 
owners is going to pay for the instal- 
lation costs of the system, the ques- 
tion becomes moot and the village is 
required to repeal the ordinance. 

Final readings and passage of 
the ordinances is expected to come 
at the next village board meeting 
scheduled for Monday, March 6. 



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February 25, 2000 



POLICE BEAT 



Persons charged with a crime are Innocent until proven guilty In a court of law. 



ANTIOCH 



DUI 

Crystal V. Erickson, 22, 15623 
W. 21st St., Wadsworth was stopped 
byAntioch Police at 2:46 a.m. Feb. 
20. Erickson was reportedly driving 
a red Plymouth which was traveling 
eastbound on Rte. 173 at Deep Lake 
Rd. Police observed the vehicle 
weaving on the roadway, drifting 
from the shoulder to the median. 
Police followed the vehicle which 
crossed the white fog line, drove on 
the shoulder several times and 
crossed the solid yellow median 
causing the vehicle to enter the 
westbound lane. Once stopped, Er- 
ickson reportedly informed police 
the vehicle did not have insurance 
on it Erickson was charged with 
driving under the influence and has 
a court date of 9 a,m. March 14 at 
Branch III Court in Grayslake. 

Sandra J. Tujo, 51 , 695 Ander- 
son Dr., Lake-In-The-Hills was 
stopped by Antioch Police at 6:03 
p.m. Feb. 11 while northbound on 
Rte. 83 at Orchard St. Police were 
advised by a complainant a white 
Cadillac was observed northbound 
on Rte. 83 from Rte. 173, reportedly 
swerving all over the road and strik- 
ing the curb. The police officer saw 
the vehicle almost come to a com- 
plete stop while in traffic, abruptly 
causing the front end to dive down 
and the rear of the car to rise up. 
The Cadillac reportedly continued 
with its high beam headlights on, 
following northbound traffic with 
its right tum signal on, then quickly 
turned east into the westbound left 
tum lane crossing the double yel- 
low center lines with the entire ve- 
hicle. The officer pulled the vehicle 
over on Orchard St. Tujo was 
charged with driving under the in- 
fluence with a court date of 9 a.m. 
April 4 at Branch III Court in 
Grayslake. 

Suspended license 

Michael A. Cleaver, 31, 24521 
Passavant, Round Lake Beach was 
stopped by Antioch Police at 10:22 
p.m. Feb. 20 while southbound on 
Rte. 83 at North Ave. Cleaver was re- 
portedly driving a blue Ford Mus- 
tang without rear registration lights 
illuminated. Once stopped, Cleaver 
advised the officer his Illinois dri- 
ver's license was suspended and the 
vehicle belonged to a friend so he 
was not sure if it was insured. 
Cleaver was transported to Antioch 
Police Station where he received 
three tickets, for no rear registration 
light, driving while his license was 
suspended and operating an unin- 
sured vehicle. Cleaver was released 
on a personal recognizance bond 
pending a 9 a.m., March 22 court 
date at Branch III Court in 
Grayslake. 



Leena A. Coleman, 18, 40177 W. 
Lake Shore Dr., Antioch was 
stopped byAntioch Police at 1 1:45 
p.m. Feb. 19 while westbound on 
Rte. 173 at Virgil. Coleman was re- 
portedly driving a white Pontiac 
westbound on Rte. 173 from Tiffany 
with only the right headlight illumi- 
nated. Police allegedly observed the 
vehicle had no license plates on it. 
When pulled over, Coleman pre- 
sented a traffic citation when asked 
for her driver's license. In addition, 
Coleman reportedly did not have 
any valid registration for the vehi- 
cle. When Coleman's information 
was checked via computer, her dri- 
ver's license came back suspended. 
Coleman was transported to Anti- 
och Police Station where she re- 
ceived a warning for improper 
lighting and citations for having no 
valid registration and driving while 
on a suspended license. Coleman 
was released on a personal recog- 
nizance bond with a court date of 
10:30 a.m. March 22 at Branch III 
Court in Grayslake. 



David E. Cote, 20, 21808 W. 
North Ave., Antioch was stopped by 
Antioch Police on North Ave. west 
of Dwight. Cote was reportedly dri- 
ving a gray Oldsmobile 4-door east- 
bound on North Ave. with only one 
headlight illuminated and no front 
license plate displayed. Cote told po- 
lice he had a valid insurance card, 
but did not have a driver's license. 
When Cote's identifiers were run 
through the computer, he was found 
to have a suspended driver's license. 
Cote was to be transported to Anti- 
och Police Station when he request- 
ed the officer ask his passenger to re- 
move the vehicle to his home. 

While the officer spoke with the 
passenger, Justin J. Rockow, 19, 415 
Maplewood Dr., Antioch, he report- 
edly smelled an odor of burnt 
cannabis. The officer asked Rockow 
if he had anything illegal on his per- 
son or in the vehicle, and Rockow 
replied "yes," saying he had a smok- 
ing pipe anaplastic container of 
cannabis in his left front pants 
pocket. The officer removed both 
items and placed Rockow under ar- 
rest. Rockow reportedly would only 
state the pipe and cannabis were 
for his own personal use and noth- 
ing else. Rockow was charged with 
unlawful possession of cannabis. 

Cote was ticketed for improper 
lighting (one head lamp), driving 
while the license is suspended and 
having no front license plate on the 
vehicle. 

No valid license 

James E. Meyer, 26, 6110-12th 
Ave., Kenosha, Wis., was stopped by 
Antioch Police at 7:03 a.m. Feb. 19 
while southbound on Deep Lake 
Rd. north of Depot St. Police report- 
edly locked in by radar a blue Chevy 
i Celebrity at 71 mph in a 55 mph 
zone. Meyer was pulled over at 
Deep Lake Rd. and Hidden Creek. 
Meyer reportedly told police he left 
his wallet at home. When checked 
through the computer, Meyer came 
back with no valid driver's license 
in either Wisconsin or Illinois. Mey- 
er was transported to the Antioch 
Police Station where he received 
tickets for speeding, failure to wear 
a seatbelt and having no valid dri- 
ver's license. Meyer was released on 
$100 cash bond with a court date of 
10:30 a.m. March 22 at Branch III 
Court in Grayslake. 

Jeffery M. Bronder, 27, 910 
Main St., Antioch was stopped by 
Antioch Police at 2.08 a.m. Feb. 14 
while eastbound on North Ave. at 
Main St. Bronder was reportedly 
driving a brown Chevy Blazer with 
only the left headlight illuminated. 
When pulled over, Bronder stated 
to the officer he did not have a dri- 
ver's license, producing a Illinois 
identification card instead. When 
checked through the computer, 
Bronder's license came back expired 
as of May 23, 1998. Bronder was 
transported to Antioch Police Sta- 
tion where he received tickets for 
improper lighting (one head lamp) 
and no valid driver's license. Bron- 
der was released on $100 cash bond 
with a court date of 10:30 a.m. April 
12 at Branch HI Court in Grayslake. 

LAKE VILLA 

Accidents possibly 
caused by seizure 

A 25-year-old Round Lake 
Beach woman involved in two mi- 
nor accidents might have been af- 
fected by extremely low blood sug- 
ar. On Feb. 17 at about 6:30 p.m. a 
1994 Chevrolet Cavalier, driven by 
the woman was observed driving 
erratically, westbound on Rte. 132. 
A witness followed her as she 
turned southbound onto Rte. 83, 
where he observed a northbound 
driver attempt to evade the Chevy 
as it crossed the center line. The 
northbound driver was side- 
swiped, but the woman did not 



POLICE & FIRE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A5 



stop. The witness then followed her 
westbound onto Monaville Rd. and 
observed her weaving into the east- 
bound lane. At that point, she lost 
control of her car, swerving and 
striking a stone berm and a tree in 
front of 17 E Monaville Rd. When 
Lake Villa police arrived at the scene, 
the driver appeared disoriented and 
had no recollection of what had hap- 
pened. Responding EMTs tested her 
blood sugar level at 20, while the 
normal range is 80-120. The woman, 



who appeared to have suffered a dia- 
betic seizure, was taken to Condcll 
Medical Center. 

Driving without a 
license 

A 1 991 silver Chevrolet Wagon 
was observed at 8:25 p.m. on Feb. 13 
heading northbound on Rte. 83 at 
Petite Lake Rd., with no license plate 
light The driver, David Hicks, 30, of 



Waukegan, was stopped at Rte. 83 , 
and Apollo Ct Hicks told the Lake ' 
Villa police officer that he had no li- 
cense with him, that he had paid all 
fees and fines due, and that he was 
not sure if his license was valid. A 
dispatch check revealed that Hicks' 
license was suspended. A citation 
was issued. Hicks said he had paper- 
work at home to prove his fines and 
fees had all been paid. The police of- 
ficer advised Hicks to bring his pa- 
pers to Branch III court in Grayslake. 



St Pat's Dance 

Featuring 

The Scotch Lads 

Larry Leafblad, Ray Trusky, Bob Schmidt, 
John Sturino, and Jerry Kuta 

FRIDAY, MAR 17, REN WOOD CC 

Hainesvllle Road, Round Lake Beach 

Food at 5, Music Starts at 7, $1 Adm 

Fund Raiser for Leafblad and Schmidt for County Board 
A copy of our report is currently on file with the clerk 



Silk-Jf-Haz bridal Salon 






One 
Day 




Tuesday, Feb. 29, 2 000 

No personal checks 



847-5:46-3 199' .240 J)f. Cedar Xghe MB ftpundJhke 





Feb. 25 & 26 

It's already reduced 
50*-70\.. 

So you'll be saving 

62 % -77 % OFF 

regular price 

Menswear - Womenswear - Shoes 



JACK'S 



Four S< 




ii 1 1 1 



414 Lake St. • Antioch 
(847) 395-6880 

MON-WED 9:30-6 THURS, FRI 9:30-8 SAT 9:30-5:30 






i*i t.I-.-^.Lt*-' •%*»-- A 1 



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A6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 




February 25, 2000 




Happy to help 

Antioch Township Supervisor Stephen Smouse presents a check 
to Mary Clare Jakes, associate division manager fo Lake County's 
Catholic Charities, for $2,000 to help fund senior services, bud- 
get counseling and physician referral service for medicaid recip- 
ients. Most of the donation will be used to assist the Meals on 
Wheels program, which benefits 49 people in who live in the town- 
ship and have meals delivered to their homes. — Photo by Can- 
dace H. Johnson 



Swing Street Cafe to feature 
performing arts, quilt raffle 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Staff Reporter 



A "swinging cafe" will be taking 
over the Antioch Community High 
School (ACHS) south gym Friday and 
Saturday, March 10-11. The show 
starts each night at 7:30 p.m. 

Swing Street Cafe 2000, present- 
ed by the ACHS Fine Arts Depart- 
ment, will highlight various perform- 
ing arts groups. 

Scheduled to perform at this 
year's event are ACHS jazz ensembles, 
concert and symphonic bands, along 
with soloists, show choir, Fortune 
Eight Choir and theater members. 



In addition to the musical enter- 
tainment, refreshments available in- 
clude nachos, pizza, potatoes, 
desserts and beverages. 

A variety of raffle prizes donated 
by area businesses will be awarded 
through drawings each night. 

A special quilt raffle is planned in 
addition to the nightly giveaways. 
The twin-size custom-designed quilt 
was made and donated by Robin 
Kessell of Quilter's Dream in Antioch. 
Valerie Bonhivert from Harmony 
Quilting provided the quilting work. 

Tickets for the nightly and quilt 
raffles can be purchased prior to the 
shows. Nightly raffle tickets are $1 



each or six for $5. Quilt raffle tickets 
are $5 each. For information regard- 
ing ticket purchases, contact 395- 
1421, ext 294. 

Admission to Swing Street Cafe 
2000 is $6 for adults, $3 for students 
with children ages five and under ad- 
mitted free. No advance admission 
tickets are available. Tickets will be 
available at the door only with doors, 
opening at 7 p.m. 

The money generated by this 
event is used to help with the ACHS 
instrumental music program. 

Assisting with the fund raising 
event is ACHS Music & Performance 
Sponsors. 



First National Bank offers new web site 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Staff Reporter 



A new web site is planned by 
First National Bank-Employee 
Owned (FNBEO). 

To be included is a little some- 
thing for everyone, according to 
Karen Kubin of FNBEO. 

Items such as community 
events, stock quotes or checking ac- 
count information are included on 
die site. 

Initially introduced in 1996, 
www.fnbeo.com has been updated to 
include even more information which 
will benefit community members. 

"We are constantly striving to 
bring our customers and communi- 
ty members the best possible ser- 
vices," said Kubin, FNBEO market- 
ing officer. "Our website is just an- 



We ate constantly striving 

to bring our customers and 

community members tlie 

best possible services. Our 

web site is just aiwtfter way 

to achieve that goal 

Karen Kubin, 

marketing officer 

First National Bank 

other way to achieve that goal." 

Highlighting information for the 
products and services of FNBEO, the 
web site focuses on informational 
and fun pages which are hoped to in- 
terest all web surfers. 

Two of the more popular 
pages are Retirement Planner and 



Kids Klub. 

The retirement planner contains 
information on calculating retire- 
ment benefits, travel ideas plus re- 
tirement focused magazine articles. 

The Kids Klub includes a home 
work helper, games, an allowance 
transfer form and special kids shop- 
ping page. 

The site features a community cal- 
endar listing events for both Antioch 
and Gurnee areas. 

The web site can be accessed at 
www.fnbeo.com. 

Persons or organizations desir- 
ing to list an event on the communi- 
ty calendar can contact Kubin at 838- 
2265 or e-mail to 

webmail@fnbeo.com. 

FNBEO has locations at 485 Lake 
St. in Antioch and 36044 N. Brook- 
side Dr. in Gurnee. 



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Lindenhurst, IL 60046 



Prince of Peace hosts 
9th annual Mardi Gras 



By BRENDA BEITSCHER 
Staff Reporter 



Does the French Quarter seem 
too far away? Wish you could direct 
your feet down Bourbon St.? 

Experience all the sights and 
sounds of a traditional New Orleans 
Mardi Gras at Prince of Peace Parish 
in Lake Villa on Friday and Saturday, 
March 3-4. This popular fund-raising 
event includes several specially 
themed rooms. 

Two "Riverboat Casino" rooms, 
the Bayou Princess and the Missis- 
sippi Queen, will feature blackjack 
tables and other games of chance. 

Entertainment will vary from 
"Pat;. O'Brien V providing food, 
drinks'C'humcanes") and live music 
by "The Fairlanes," to "Le Farce 
Comedy Club," spotlighting Bruce 
Carroll and karaoke by Evening Star 
Entertainment. 

"The Cabaret" will be a variety 



show lounge, featuring lip sync, 
comedy and impersonations, while a 
taste of real Dixieland jazz will be 
presented by the Banjo buddies Dix- 
ieland Quartet in "the Dixie Land- 
ing." 

Cuisine will not be ignored. 
Taste Cajun cooking at the "Cajun 
Cafe," topped off with a French-in- 
spired dessert and flavored coffee at 
the "French Bakery." Muffulettas (a 
New Orleans style sandwich) will be 
available, as well as other types of 
sandwiches. 

Tickets can be purchased in ad- 
vance for $8 at First American Bank 
in Lake Villa, State Bank of the Lakes 
(Antioch, Grayslake and Linden- 
hurst) and First Midwest Bank- in 
Grayslake. Tickets will be sold for $10 
at the door. 

Prince of Peace is located on 
Route 83 just south of Route 132 in 
Lake Villa. Participants must be 21 to 
attend. Doors will open at 6 p.m. 



Volunteers needed for MS Walk 



The Greater Illinois Chapter of 
the National Multiple Sclerosis So- 
ciety seeks volunteers to help with 
every aspect of the Mercedes-Benz 
2000 MS WALK. The event takes 
place April 9 at eight sites in metro- 
politan Chicago. The success of this 
event not only depends on the 
10,000 participants projected to 
participate in the event, but also on 
the attention to detail provided by 
volunteers who help the event run 
smoothly. This year's event is pre- 
sented by Mercedes-Benz. 

The McHenry County route 
needs volunteers to assist the plan- 
ning committee with details of the 
local walk, which will start at Cen- 
tennial Park and follow the River- 



walk. Volunteers may help with se- 
curing sponsorships, organizing 
food and entertainment, develop- 
ing promotional ideas and assisting 
witfi operations on the day of the 
event The event committee meets 
monthly for about an hour and a 
half. 

Prospective volunteers can 
learn more about the MS WALK and 
the needs of the Naperville site by 
calling Chiayu Chiu at (312) 421- 
4500. There are jobs for everyone in 
support of the event, which sup- 
ports multiple sclerosis research 
and programs offered to 11,000 
men and women in northern and 
central Illinois who have this dis- 
ease of the central nervous system. 



Call (847) 356^4700 for more information or. to register. 



LOCAL DIGEST 



'Faschings Dance' 

The German American Club of 
Antioch will present its annual 
"Faschings Dance" (otherwise 
known as Masquerade Dance) be- 
ginning at 7 p.m. Saturday, March 4 
at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Hall, 
130 E. Grand Ave. in Lake Villa. The . 
more guests attending in costume 
the better, but it is not required. 

For ticket information, contact 
Dorothy Jordahl 356-5484. "Join us 
for an evening of Gmutlichkeit," Jor- 
dahl said. 

Comedy Night 

The fourth annual comedy night 
for the Antioch Junior Woman's 
Club is planned at 7 p.m. Saturday, 
March 4 at St. Peter's Father Hanley 
Center in Antioch. The yearly fund- 
raising event helps the woman's 



club raise money for various com- 
munity organizations and causes. 

The evening includes hors d'oeu- 
vres, cash bar and a silent auction. 
Tickets are available at First National 
Bank-Employee Owned, Antioch 
Family Chiropractic and from any 
woman's club member. For informa- 
tion, contact Karen Kubin 838-2265. 

Smorgasbord 

A smorgasbord lunch is to be 
served from 2:30-6:30 p.m. Saturday, 
March 4 at the Salem United 
Methodist Church on 85th St., just 
west of Rte. 83, in Salem, Wis. The 
menu is to include salad bar, meat 
balls, chicken, roast beef, potatoes, 
vegetables, roll, dessert and bever- 
age. Handicapped seating and serv- 
ing will be available on the ground 
level. Tickets will be available at the 
door at a cost of $6 for adults, $3 for 
children ages 6-10; and free for chil- 
dren ages 5 and under. For informa- 
tion, phone 262-843-2525. 








February 25,2000 



NEIGHBORS 



n 


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o 



g 





•2 



Name: Randy.S. Denman 

Home: Grayslake - 

Occupation: Branch Manger for 
First : American Bank in Lake Villa 

Community involvement: Colts 
Football volunteer 

I'm originally from: Chicago 

I graduated from: Elmhurst 

College 

My family consists of: my wife 
Dawn, and my sons Dan, 14, and Pat, 12 

;My pets are: Holly, a three-year-old schnauzer 

What I like best about my town: small/cozy, friendly, 
caring, good schools, good people . 

What I like best about my job: People- working with staff 
and customers 

The secret to my success is: Treat people with respect, 
being honest and a good listener 

I relax by: reading, bowling or walking my dog 

My perfect day in Grayslake would be: crisp fall day 
watching Colt football all day 

Last book I read: Patricia Comwell's "Southern Cross" ■ 

Favorite TV show is: /'The Practice" (currently), "M*A'S*H" 
(all time) 

Favorite movie is: "Rocky" 

Favorite music: Country 

Favorite band or musician: RebaMcEntire 

Favorite restaurant: Olive Garden 

My life's motto is: Oh well! (Means roll with the puchcs, take 
the good.with the bad) 

If I could be anyone in history, I would be: Joe Montana 

If I won the lottery, I would: take care of my whole family 
'(aunt, cousins, in-laws) and move to California 

My greatest accomplishments are: raising my sons to be 
^respectful and honest 

>l want to be remembered as: someone who cared about 
'people and always willing to help 

People who knew me in high school would say: quiet, 
' biut a leader^and a pretty good athlete , 

HVIy pet peeve is: leayirig lights on when yoii leave a room 

Most interesting person I ever met was: Bob Love, 
former Chicago Bull 

.My dream job would be: some type of teaching or coaching 
^inLakeTahoe 

If I had a plane ticket to anywhere, I would go to: Lake 

Tahoe 



If you have a "Neighbor" that you would like to see profiled in 
this column^ callNeal Tucker at 223-8161. 



Lakeland Newspapers /A7 



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Concordia University of Wiscon- 
sin brings a concert of saaed music 
to Bethel Lutheran Church in 
Gurnee Friday, Feb. 25. The concert 
will consist of a cappella music sung 
in German, Latin and English, writ- 
ten by the old masters to presentday 
composers, including classical sa- 
cred literature, liturgical music and 
spirituals. 

Beautiful Savior Evangelical 
Lutheran Church of Antioch is joint 
sponsor of the event with Bethel. 
Rev. Darald Gruen explained that the 
concert will consist of songs dealing 
with God and his word, as well as 
God's love, Jesus' death on the cross 
- and the resurrection of Jesus. 

Lindenhurst resident- Jonathan 
Gruen, a junior at Concordia, will 
perform in the concert, along with 50 
choir members. 

This 7 p.m. concert is open to the 
public, Bethel Lutheran Church is lo- 
cated at 5110 Grand Ave. in Gurnee. 
An offering will be received. For fur- 
ther information, contact Bethel at 
244-9647. 

Kammerchor (German for 
"chamber choir") was organized in 
1980 by Kenneth T. Kosche, profes- 
sor of music, its present director. 
Overtheyears the choir has grown in 
size and musical stature from a small 
ensemble of male voices to its pre- 
sent size of 50 singers of mixed voic- 
es. Students from all curricUlar areas 
may audition for the choir, giving tal- 
ented young men and women, irre- 
spective of their vocational studies, 
the opportunity to use their musical 
skills in a meaningful way through 
this choir; Known as the university's 
touring choir, Kammerchor has trav- 
. t eled^ext^sjvely^thrp.ugliout. the. 
United 'States,'mucrT ofijanaday to 
Great Britain (1988) and Taiwan 
(1998). Plans are being made for a 
tour to Brazil in 2001. Trie choir's 
repertoire consists of sacred music 
classics from all periods as well as 
spirituals, hymns, and folk song lit- 
erature. The annual "Christ the King 
Celebration" in November allows the 
choir to sing with various instru- 
mental ensembles and the universi- 
ty's 63-rank chapel organ. Tour liter- 
ature is usually a cappella. Kammer- 



chor has made several CD record- 
ings and is featured regularly on 
"The Lutheran Hour," a radio min- 
istry of the' International Lutheran 
Laymen's League, Lutheran Church- 
Missouri Synod. 

Kosche, professor of music, has 
been on the faculty of Concordia 
University Wisconsin since 1978. He 
is chairman of the department, a po- 
sition he has held for 17 of his 22 
years at CUW. An avid composer; he 
has nearly. 150 pieces in the cata- 
logues of a dozen publishers. He has 
been a Fellow of the Melodious Ac- 
cord program, studying several times 
in new York with noted composer 
and teacher Alice Parker. Kosche also 
directs Concordia Chorale, the uni- 
versity's chapel choir, teaches cours- 
es in the Master of Arts in Church 
Music degree program, and is direc- 
tor of Chapel Music. In 1999, the 
faculty named him Faculty Laure- 
ate, an honor bestowed to recog- 
nize him as the outstanding facul- 
ty member of the year. 

Beautiful. Savior Evangelical 
Lutheran Church currently meets In 
the worship building of the Light- 
house Baptist Church. Beautiful Sav- 
ior is a three-year-old congregation 
looking to purchase seven acres of 
land to build a chUrch onVFor more 
information, contact Darald Gruen 
at 265-2450. 



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Mysterious Malta 

by JIM WARNKEN, President, North Star Travel, Inc. 

Temples dating back to 5.000 years before the birth of Christ. Uncxptninnble 
"cart tracks" leading into the sea. Prehistoric cave-like tombs, Miles of catacombs 
from Roman times. Where is this fascinating land? 

It's an island in the Mediterrean about 60 miles south of Sicily, its called 
Malta. 

You say you haven't heard of Malta? Ever heard of the Maltese falcon from 

the old Bogart movie? Then there's the Maltese cross which for some reason is 

.popular among bikers. (The falcon was a token payment for the use of the island 

as a home for the knights of the Order of St. John, the cross was the symbol of the 

knights with its eight points representing the eight homeland of the Order.) 

Students of the Bible will know that St. Paul speaks of his experiences after 
being shipwrecked on Malta. His preaching has caused Malta to remain a Catholic . 
country to this day. 

But docs Malta have white sand beaches and sunny skies? Sure, in fact, it is a 
top vacation spot for the Europeans though still relatively unknown- to most 
Americans. 

However, it's not the beaches of the climate that attracted me to Malta.. 
Instead, it's Malta's rich and colorful history which is everywhere on the island. 

The government building in use today, date back to the 14th Century.'. Life in 
waited cities a thousand years old is as it was in 900 A.D.. -For 35 cents a Maltese 
family will let you tour some catacombs they discovered while digging a cistern 
under their house. 

Due to its strategic location, Malta has been inhabited by many nationalities 
throughout history. Each has left some remembrance. My stay in Malta was more 
educational titan Mrs. Toppings* history class at Stelmctz H.S. ever was. A trip to 
Malta would be a worthwhile addition to any European vacation. 

NORTH ^f^ STAR 

CRUISES 

Lindenhurst 

www.noruistartravel.com 

(847) 356-2000 



Friday, Feb. 25 

7:30-8:30 a.m., The Business 
Networking Group meets at Copper 
Creek Grill, 950 Lake View Park-: 
way (behind Hawthorne Mall) in - 
Vernon Hills, for.lnfo., call Dan at 
803;9904 during business hours j 

Saturday, Feb. 26 

9:30:a.rh.-3 p.m., Computer 
.Country Expo. held at the Lake 
County fairgrounds, Rte. 120 and 
Rte, 45 In Grayslake. $6 admts- 
slohilklds under 12 admitted free, 
call .662-0811 for details 

"10 a.m.-Noon, Page-A-Day 

: ;Writer/ t s^rbup meets, at Salem ; 

Community Library, info, at (414) 
843-3517 ~~ 

11 a.m. -4 p.m., Psychic Faire held 
at Leaves of Earth Shoppe, 928 
Main Sti in Antioch, call 395-3176 

7 p.m. -midnight, "Medieval 
Knights? held at Antioch VFW Hall 
with dancing,' banquet, raffle and 
more. Contact the" Antioch Cham- 
ber of Commerce at 395-2233 ' 

Sunday, Feb. 27 

7:3QrlO;30 a.m.,. Pancake Break- ., 
fast and Bake Sale sponsored by.'P 
Bristol Order of Eastern Star #164 
at the Masonic Center, 8102 
199th'Ave. in Bristol, WL 
$4/adults, $2.50/ages 5-12 

1-4 p.m., The Gurnee Women's - 
Business Association hosts a Busi- 
ness Expo at the Gurnee Holiday 
Inn.. Free adm., door prizes, and. . 
. coupons from area businesses. 
Food donations appreciatedtp ben- 
efitTVSafe Place of Lake County 

2:30 pirn., Reader's Theatre pre- K '<? 
sents "Voices 2000" by Peter Dee 
at the PM&L Theatre, 877 Main 
^StfMrMntioch.iFTee i and . no>reser- 
vations heeded, call 587-7204 

Monday, Feb. 28 

1 12:45 p.m., Bingo at Antioch 
-Senior Center, info, at 395-7120: 

6:45 p.m., Bingo at Antioch 

Moose Lodge, Rte. 173, 2 miles 

west of Antioch, info, at 395-9780 
,,,....,,... , .... 

7:30 p.m., Antioch Jaycees meet 
at Regency Inn, call 395-8035 

7:30 p.m., Lakes Area Community ■■■ 
Band at ACHS, info, at 395-5566 



.-**;> 



•n 



Tuesday, Feb. 29 

6:45?p.rn., Antioch VFW Bingo, 
doors open 4:30 p.m., 395-5393 

7 : 8 p.ln., Weigh to Win program 
held at Calvary Christian Center, 
Monavitle Rd., west of Rte. 83 in 
Lake Villa, Call 356-6181 

Wednesday, March 1 

•Sequoit Board of Directors meets 

6:30 p.m., TOPS Weight Loss 
weighrln, 7 p.m. meeting at Anti- 
och Senior Center, 817 Hofbeck," 1 , 
Info, at 395-6437 or 395-8143 

7-9 p.m., Northern Lake County 
Quitter's Guild meets at State Bank 
of the Lakes' in Lindenhurst, for . 
Info, call Valerie at 838-2126 

Thursday, March 2 

7 p.m., American Sewing Guild 
group "Running in Stitches meets 
at State Bank of the Lakes, Lin- 
denhurst, call Janet at 265-7932 
or Chris at 548-8223 



8-9 a.m., Network Lake County, a 
business networking group, meets "\ 
at In-Laws restaurant in Gurnee, 
guests invited, call 548-5305 

GOT SOMETHING 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A 14-day notice is needed 
for all calendar requests. ' ' ,~, 
Call 223-8161 and ask far 
calendar assistance. Ore-mail 
calendar@lpnews.com 



m^*+-*-.Xi->i*--it • 



H .u^ .j-«.^^.t*-rf; «*i^.ti 



AS/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 25, 2000 



She doesn't act a day over 59 



I recently received a phone call 
from a very spunky grandma 
who asked if I would share 
with the whole town about her 
recent birthday party that she was 
absolutely delighted about. It was a 
millennium celebration for her 90th 
birthday and it was by far one of 
the most memorable days of 
Grandma Sunny's very active life. 
The bash, in her honor, was attend- 
ed by her entire family as well as 
the multitudes of her extended 
family, which includes not only her 
18 grandchildren and 24 great- 
grandchildren, but some of the 65 
or so other children she so lovingly 
took care of over the years. 

Her 40 year-old godson was 
there, as well as her daughter Bobbi 
from Colorado, and Chee Chee 
from Rockford, along with relatives 
from Madison and Milwaukee. 

SoniaArndt, affectionately 
known as "Grandma Sunny," lets 
no grass grow under her feet. Not 
only does she do her own driving, 
she runs her own errands and still 
manages to take care of other peo- 




JINGLE 

FROM 

PRINGLE 

Lynn Pringle 



pie in her busy day. She had 90 
candles on her cake at her very spe- 
cial celebration which was held at 
Twin Oaks in Wilmot, Wis. She had 
great things to say about the deli- 
cious food and outstanding service. 
One of the highlights of the day 
came when all the children gath- 
ered around to sing her favorite 
song: "You Are My Sunshine." 
She was especially touched 
when presented with a memory 
album filled with photos of special 
occasions that had taken place 
throughout the years. Also in the 
album were letters, poems, stories 
and little snippets written from var- 
ious members of her family and 
extended family. Accolades to her 
daughter Cathy who correlated the 
entire album by mailing it from 



state to state making sure everyone 
had an opportunity to add their 
special memories of Grandma 
Sunny. 

She was absolutely tickled pink 
(which was the color of her dress) 
over all the attention, adoration 
and affection of that one special 
day for her. Being able to celebrate 
her 90th birthday in the year 2000 
was unique in itself. 

Over the years, in every card or 
letter Grandma Sunny ever wrote, 
she always inscribed "I love you a 
whole lotsa much." Well, from the 
sounds of it Grandma Sunny, 
there's an awful lot of people out 
there that "love you a whole lotsa 
much" too. 

Happy belated birthday and 
please call me in 2010 with all the 
details from your 100th birthday 
celebration. 

And so goes another "Jingle 
from Pringle." 

Readers with information for 
"Jingle from Pringle" should call 
Lynn Pringle at 395-6364. 



Congregations join for World Day of Prayer 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Staff Reporter 



Seven churches in the Antioch, 
Lake Villa, Lindenhurst and Millburn 
areas are coming together as part of 
the local observance of the World 
Day of Prayer. 

The joint observance is sched- 
uled for 1 p.m. Friday, March 3 in the 
United Methodist Church, 848 Main 
St.. in Antioch. 

Members of the church who are 
organizing the program are Eunice 
Rawson, Betsy Houghton, and Jane 
Petersen. 



The program will be preceded by 
a pot luck luncheon at noon in 
Wesley Hall at the church. Anyone in 
the community may attend the lun- 
cheon if they wish to bring a dish to 
pass. 

The other churches participating 
in putting on the program are St. 
Peters Catholic of Antioch, St. 
Ignatius Episcopal of Antioch, Lake 
Villa Methodist, SL Mark Lutheran of 
Lindenhurst, Millburn 

Congregational and First Church 
Christian Science of Antioch. 

There will not be any child care 
provided. 



The Rev. Rusell Carlson, Interim 
Pastor at Antioch United Methodist, 
will speak during the program. 

The program this year has been 
written by Indonesian women on the 
theme "Talitha Kumi: Young 
Woman, Stand Up!" based on the 
words Jesus spoke when raising 
Jairus' daughter from the dead in 
MarkS: 21-23, 35-42. 

World Day of Prayer is a program 
written each year by women of a dif- 
ferent country, and presented in me 
various communities around the 
world under the sponsorship of 
Church Women United. 




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Formula for fun 

Julie Applegren, 6, and Tara Daniels, 6, marvel at the wonders 
of science at St. Peters School's Science Fair in Antioch Feb. 
3.— Photo by Kirsten N. Hough 

Osmond visits local school to 
help provide health care funds 

In efforts to increase the num- 
ber of children receiving quality 
health care coverage in Illinois, 
State Rep. Timothy Osmond {R- 
Antioch) visited Kenneth Murphy 
Junior High to deliver enrollment 
kits for the KidCare Program. 

"Our children are the best 
investment we can make for the 
future," said Osmond, whose dis- 
trict covers Antioch and Lake Villa 
townships. "Making sure they 
receive a quality education, will only 
go so far if we can not keep them 
healthy." 

Osmond was joined by Jane 
Longo, chief of Bureau of KidCare 
from the Illinois Department of 
Public Aid, and Beach Park 
Community Consolidated School 
District 3 Superintendent Dr. Larry 
Fleming in distributing over 150 
packets to eligible families. 

"In our ongoing quest to pro- 
vide quality services for our chil- 
I dren, we are evaluating the KidCare 
State funded program," said 
Fleming. "We look forward to offer- 
ing this exemplary program for 
Beach Park School District 3." 

KidCare is Illinois' health insur- 
ance program for children 18-year- 
old or younger, which covers every- 
thing from pregnancy needs, to rou- 
tine check-ups, to broken legs. The 
cost of KidCare is based on the 
employment earnings of adults, and 
pre-existing conditions do not 
exclude a child. 



"No child should be excluded 
from receiving good medical atten- 
tion, regardless of their parental 
income or medical coverage. Since 
we want our children to have to 
have healthy bodies and healthy 
minds, I am also strongly support- 
ing the Beach Park School District 3 
Building Referendum, which will be 
on the March 21st voting ballot," 
said Osmond. 

The approval of the referendum 
will determine if the Beach Park 
School District 3 receives a $10.5 
million state grant to assist in build- 
ing a new middle school. 

"If passed this Building 
Referendum will provide needed 
state funds to build a new middle 
school, add classrooms to Newport 
Elementary, renovate libraries and 
upgrade technology in the Learning 
Resource Centers," said Osmond. 

There are 12 portable class- 
rooms in the district, which house 
300 students daily, and total enroll- 
ment has reached 2,026 students. 
According to state standards there 
are 441 inadequately housed stu- 
dents, and student enrollment con- 
tinues to rise 3 to 5 percent annual- 

According to Fleming, "the 
community has an opportunity to 
seize $10.5 million in state funds, 
providing we are successful with the 
referendum, and breaking that 
down, the state will give our school 
district $1 for every $2 spent locally. 



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THE 
CUPBOARD 



John Phelps 



Hall doors 
roll open 

It's already been a memorable 
start to the millennium where 
sports in Lake County is con- 
cerned. 

And it got even better a couple of 
weeks ago, especially for four long- 
time Lake County bowling legends 
who were inducted into the Lake 
County Bowling Hall of Fame. 

The gala took place at the Grand 
Palace in Gumee, where a nice 
crowd of roughly 150 people enjoyed 
the festivities. 

The first inductee was Robert C. 
Rosengren for Meritorious. Bob's 
loVe affair with the game began in 
1941. His highest average was 184 
back in 1973 when he bowled for the 
Sportsman's League at Grand Bowl. 
Bob competed in many leagues at 
Grand Bowl and Bertrand Lanes. 

Bob was a certified coach and 
instructor for YABA for 20 years at 
Grand Bowl. He is best known for 
teaching the three C's of bowling-co- 
ordination, concentration, and con- 
sistency. 

The second inductee, alsofor 
Meritorious, was Eugene Payne, Sr., 
who has been involved with the 
sport for over 45 years. 'Gene' was 
instrumental in organizing the 
YMCA Mixed league at Sunset Bowl, 
which lasted for more than 20 years. 
Gene held the position of treasurer 
the entire time. 

He has rolled numerous near- 
perfect games to go along with 
countless 700 series. Gene currently 
competes in the National Tourna- 
ment every year. 

The third inductee, for Perfor- 
mance is Ron Axberg. Ron has 
earned numerous tides on several 
levels during his many years while af- 
filiated Willi the sport. Some of his 
accolades include winning the LCBA 
Scratch All Events tide in 1993 fol- 
lowed by the Illinois State North End 
Division Championship the ensuing 
year, 

Ron also was also a member of 
the team that broke the 1996 record 
and set the new mark of 3,591 in the 
Hawthorn Mens Major Division last 
year. He also carried a 220 average at 
Hawthorn Lanes in 1998-99 and has 
five 300 games to go along with an 
823 series that he shot in the Moose 
State Tournament in 1997 at Lake- 
hurst Bowl. 

The final inductee was Pat Cor- 
nell, also for Performance. Pat start- 
ed bowling at the ripe age of 17 and 
since then, has held a200-plus aver- 
age for 28 years to accompany a ca- 
reer high average of 229 to this point. 

Pat was the first person to aver- 
age 200 at Sunset Lanes in 
Waukegan and for a two-year span 
in die mid-1970s was the only sanc- 
tioned Lake County 200 average. 

He also has an astounding 17 
300 games to his credit Pat also won 
the Lake County Industrial Tourna- 
ment in 1972, the Husband and Wife 
Tournament in 1973-74, and the 
Lake County Masters Toumey in 
1975. 

Among his numerous LCBA ti- 
tles are three scratch singles tides, 
two handicap singles UUes,and four 
scratch doubles tides. 

Tliis April, Pat will be compeUng 
In his 30th consecutive ABC Tourna- 
ment. Pat has bowled in many 
leagues in Chicago and Lake County 
throughout die years and is known 
as a fierce competitor. 

Sounds like all of the aforemen- 
tioned inductees could be classified 
in that category. 

Jim Zimmerman, an ABC Juris- 
dictional Associate, was the emcee 
for the annual gala. 

John Phelps can be reached at (847) 
223-8161, ext. 132; fax (847) 223- 
8810; ore-mail atedit@lndxom. 




February 25, 2000 



Lakeland Newspapers /A9 



Antioch turns up intensity; knocks off NSC champ Warren 



By STEVE PETERSON 
Staff Reporter 



The three Antioch seniors know 
what to expect from practices before 
a game with Warren. 

"Practices are more intense. The 
coaches yell at you a bit more for 
your mistakes, because Warren will 
take advantage of any weakness," 
Don Lackey, Antioch senior, said. 

Lackey scored 11 points as did 
Eric White as Antioch ended War- 
ren's eight-game win streak with a 
43-38 North Suburban Conference 
upset win. 

Lackey's five field goals included 
a crowd-pleasing slam dunk by the 
6-foot, 5-inch forward. 

"I saw one of their players back 
off me and Ari Brown set a perfect 
screen," said Lackey. 

The win was sweet for the se- 
niors - Lackey, Bmadon Clutts and 
Kyle Christopherson, who'had seen 
their share of big Warren wins in the 
batde of rivals. 

Antioch (13-12, 6-7 NSC) played 
the role of spoiler with a strong fin- 
ish. White calmly sank key free- 
throw shots. The junior was 6-7 at 
the free-throw line in the fourth. 

"We will enjoy this now, but this' 
won't mean anything tomorrow. We 
have to be able to come back and 
play hard Tuesday against Steven- 
son," Antioch coach Jeff Dresser said. 
"The first half, was the same type of 
game we had against them the first 
time at their place, but they domi- 
nated the second half. We wanted to 
play good defense and have more 
switch ups," Dresser said. 



Antioch improved to 6- 
7 in the NSC. Warren had 
led the league by four 
games going in, but suf- 
fered its second league loss, 
11-2. The Blue Devils con- 
cluded NSC play against 
Lake Forest oh Tuesday. 
Warren (17-6) is the top 
seed at the Waukegan sec- 
tional, but that was the far- 
thest thing from coach 
Chuck Ramsey's crew's 
mind on a snowy Friday 
night. 

"We had big break 
downs. We played listless- 
ly. It was a pathetic perfor- 
mance by Warren. We did 
not play Warren basket- 
ball," Ramsey said. 

- Warren's top two scor- 
ers, Aaron Moore and Mark 
Klemm, averaging 10 points 
a game, were non-factors, 
scoring a combined five 
points. Nate Alden tried to 
pickup the slack with some 
perimeter shots and led the 
team with 10 points. Junior 
forward Steve Ckrebo 




Senior forward Don Lackey (No. 44) skies for an attempted block oh War- 
ren's Russ Schaibly in Friday's North Suburban matchup in Antioch. The 
Sequoits prevailed over the NSC champs, 43-38, 

added 9 points. Warren had — Photo by Steve Young. 

its struggles at the free- 
aged a four-point lead. But a basket 



throw line. 

Antioch's Kyle Heinrich and 
Clutts kept the Warren perimeter 
game largely in check. Senior center 
Kyle Christopherson, Lackey and Co. 
dominated the middle, including 
several blocked or altered shots. 

Antioch led 16-15 at halftime. 
Warren tried to get its outside game 
going In the third quarter and man- 



by sophomore Josh Bonner (8 
points) tied the game with 10 sec- 
onds left in the third, 27-27. 

Antioch grabbed a six-point 
lead, on a trey by Kyle Heinrich, ear- 
ly in. the fourth, and maintained a 
three to six point lead until the final 
mninute. White and Brown made a 
combined 7-8 free-throws, the finale 



coming with 8.1 seconds by Brown, 
icing the win. 

Antioch, after the conference fi- 
nale with Stevenson, is at Lake For- 
est in the first round of the 
Waukegan sectional on Wednesday, 
March 1. 

Warren plays the winner ofWau- 
conda-Highland Park at home next 
Tuesday, Feb. 29. 




Let's get ready to rumble! 

Antioch's Ryan Hlinak gets ready to tangle with Danny Alcocer of 
Waubonsie Valley in the fifth-place match at last weekend's IHSA 
State Wrestling finals in Champaign. Hlinak wound up falling 13- 
7 but still received a medal and all-state honors. The senior fin- 
ished the season with a dual record of 33-7. "It always makes a 
coach proud whenever you can have someone qualify for the 
state meet," said head coach Ted Sieckowski — Photo by Steve 
Peterson. 



American Youth Basketball 
tour program available 



The American Youth Basket- 
ball tour is accepting boy's and 
girl's teams interested in compet- 
ing against good competition at 
various sights this spring and 
summer. As a team, you will be 
playing in various District tourna- 
ments and one 
National tour- 
nament. The 
District tourna- 
ments are five 
to six games 
minimum, and 
the National 
Tournament fat 
Indiana Univer- 
sity or Northern 
Iowa Universi- 
ty) will be a minimum of eight 
games. 

"This is a great alternative to 
team camps because it encom- 
passes three weekends and a four 
day tournament at the Nationals. 
You are not done playing as a 
team after only one week Tike at 
most of the team camps you see. 
Different teams are joining "The 
Tour" and seeing some very good 
results and greatlmprovements in 
their play, states Tour Director 
Brian Evans. "It's also a fantastic 



'Its also a fantastic 

developmental organization 

for younger middle school 

and junior high school kids.' 



Brian Evans 
Tour Director 



developmental organization for 
younger middle school and junior 
nigh school kids. The Was are 
guaranteed 26 games (or more if 
you choose) no matter how many 
they win or lose. Unlike many 
tournaments, you do not need to 
keep winning in 
order to keep 

g laying," said 
vans. 

The breakdown 
of the grade 
brackets this 
year are 4/5, 6, 
6/7, 8, 8/9 and 
10/11. The 
grades repre- 
sent the grades' 
the players are in this school year. 
If you would like more informa- 
tion about The Tour, you can ei- 
ther send a self-addressed 
stamped envelope to: 

The Tour, 2003 Hardwood 
Path, Lake Villa, IL 60046. Or you 
can call 223-8031 and leave a mes- 
sage with your name, number, 
and a short message, and you call 
will be returned.. The deadline for 
entering a team is April 1st, so 
don't hesitate any longer if you are 
interested in participating. 



ATHLETE OF 
THE WEEK 



Name: 

Ryan Hlinak 
School: 
Antioch 
Sport* 
Wrestling 
Year: Senior 
Last week's 
stats: The 




Name 



135-pounder finished sixth in the 
IHSA State Wrestling meet last 
weekend, held in Champaign. 



Lake County Baseball readying for 2000 campaign 

Weekend practices, preparations mark 
start of traditional spring campaign 



Spring is already in the air and 
that means Lake County Baseball is 
preparing for the start of the 2000 
season. 

Last weekend marked the begin- 
ning of the baseball season for many 
local ballplayers. With Lake County 
Baseball beginning its weekly indoor 
winter practices on Saturdays and 
Sunday, the official start of baseball 



can't be too far off. Members of Lake 
County Baseball participate in these 
practice sessions in preparation for 
the coming season. They learn the 
skills and fundamentals needed to 
be ready for the opening pitch of the 
season. Each practice session em- 
phasizes a different skill, such as hit- 
ting, bunting, base running, pitch- 
ing, catching and fielding, with 



weekly attenUon given to hitting. 

Practice continues on Saturday 
or Sunday through March and other 
days of die week based on the age of' 
the ballplayers. There is still room for 
10-12 members to Lake County 
Baseball for the year 2000 for 
ballplayers from 9 through 14. Mem- 
bers of Lake County Baseball are also 
given consideration for its traveling 
program, the Lake County Chiefs. 
You don't have to be a Chief to be a 
member of Lake County Baseball. 
For more information contact Lake 
County Baseball at 945-9606. 



; » a p eejtpji 









J *.», ** *-&.»! >>«r* 



A10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



February 25, 2000 



Lake Villa Football and Cheerleading registration slated for March, April 



Lake Villa Township Youth 
Football is a program for the children 
of Lake Villa Township and sur- 
rounding areas to play football and 
cheerlead in an organized league, for 
ages 7-14, beginning Nov. 6. 
Registration dates 

March 15 from 6 to 8 p.m.; 
March 18 from 9 a.m. to noon; April 
19 from 6 to 8 p.m.; and April 22 from 
9 a.m. to noon. 



Registration fee 

Football-$95; Cheerleading-$95 
(include shoes, socks, brief, turtle 
neck, and sweatpants); Pom Squad- 
$95; $10 discount for second family 
member and $10 additional for third 
family member. 
Location 

State Bank of the Lakes Commu- 
nity Room, 2031 Grand Ave., Linden- 
hurst. 




Credit where credit's due 

Antioch soccer star Matt Miclea was honored at halftime of the 
Sequoits varsity home basketball game against Zion-Benton. 
Miclea, who is joined by former head coach Charlie Trout, set a 
school record with 34 goals scored last fall. For his efforts, 
he was named to the All-Midwest and All-State soccer teams. 
— Photo by Steve Young 



Eight levels of 
play for football 

Bantam-Max age 8, weight 72 
pounds. Pee Wee Gold-Max age 10, 
weight up to 82 pounds (Single 
stripers 92 pounds, double stripers 
102 pounds). Pee wee Red-Heavy 
Bantam and other Pee Wee players. 
Featherweight Gold-Max age 12, 
weight up to 96 pounds (Single 
stripers 110 pounds, double stripers 
130 pounds). Featherweight Red- 
Heavy • Pee Wee, Inexperienced 
Featherweight. Lightweight Gold- 
Max age 13, Max weight 116 pounds. 
Lightweight Red-Heavy Feather- 
weight and inexperienced Light- 
weight Heavyweight-Max age 14, No 
weight limit except-Non-stripers- 



140 pounds; Single stripers-154 
pounds; Double stripers-No limit. 
Six Cheerleading programs 

Bantam-7-8 year old. Pee Wee- 
9-10 year old. Featherweight- 10- 11 
year old. Lightweight- 11-12 year old. 
Varsity- 13- 14 year old. Pom-Squad- 
Sixth through eighth grade. 

Home games are played at Lake 
Villa township Park (Caboose Park). 
Games are from Sept. 10 to Nov. 5 
and are played at the following times. 
Saturday 

Bantam-8 a.m.; Pee Wee Red- 
9:30 a.m.; Featherweight Red- 11 
am; Lightweight Red-12:30 p.m. 
Sunday 

Pee Wee Gold-9:30 a.m.; Feath- 
erweight Gold- 1 1 a.m.; Lightweight 



Gold-11 a.m.;DghtweightGold 12:30 
p.m. Varsity 2 p.m. 

Practices are normally Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday starting 
first week of July for Cheerleading 
and Aug. 1 for Football. At time of 
registration you will need to bring 
payment and a copy (to keep on file) 
of your Birth Certificate. 

Measurements for uniforms and 
equipment will also be taken. Partici- 
pants must attend registration. Also 
needed is anyone interested in coach- 
ing football or cheerleading. If inter- 
ested or need more information, con- 
tact Rickjohnsen at 356-3267 or Chip 
Hayward at 265-3427. You can visit 
the Timberwolves on the Internet at 
www.Lakeviila-timberwolves.org. 



NSC all-academic honors 



1999-2000 Fall Sports 
Antioch 

Field Hockey 

Jessica Manzer, Sasha Mika, 
Chelsey Mortenson, Jessica Ortiz, Lau- 
ra Plese, Stephanie Povilaitis, Jennifer 
Rosen, Katherine Suhar 
Girls Golf 

Carrie Cybul, Elizabeth Vanler- 
berghe 
Dunce Team 

Katie Bregenzer, Katie Dalton, 
Sarah Effinger, Megan Engelmann, 
Cory Gardell, Rachel Pashall, Trade 
Zersen 
Boys Golf 

Michael Baba, Thomas Davis, 
Timothy Jankowski, John Logan, 






Lakeland Newspapers 




Karin Kovell 







■-": 



Account Executive, 14 Years of Experience 

Serving Antioch, Lake Villa, Lindenhurst 
& Wisconsin 

PHONE (847) 223-8161, ext. 105 
PAGER (847) 237-0611 



Favorite Part of the Job: 

HELPING BUSINESSES TO SUCCEED WITH 
CREATIVE MARKETING IDEAS. 



Call to Reserve Your Advertising Space Today 



Come Worship With Us 

A Directory Of Antioch Area Churches 



Fallh evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main Si, Phone 
(647) 395-1600. Sunday Worship 8 & 10:30am, Sunday School 
9:25am., Sal. 7pm., H«. Gregory Hcrmanson, Pastor. Christian 
Day School (847) 395-1664. 

Mliilxim Congregational United Church of Christ. Grass Lake 
Rd. al File. 45. Phone (847) 356-5237. Sunday Scrvlco 10am 
Children's Program tOam. Rev. Paul R. Mellwr, Paslor. 

United Methodist Church ol Antioch. 848 Main St. Phone (847) 
335-1259. Worship B.30 & 10am.. Fellowship Time 9:30am; Sunday 
School 10am Rev. Kurt A. Garrtin, Paslor. 



SL Peter's Church. 557 W. Lake St., Anlloch. Phono (847) 395- 
0274. Masses weekdays, 7:30am; Sunday 6:30, 8, 9:30, 1 1:30am 
& Saturday 5:30pm. Rev, Father Ronald H. Anglim, Paslor. 



Graccland Baptist Church. 2GB Ida SI., AnUoch, IL 
Sunday School 11am., Morning Worship Ham . 
Sunday Evening 7pm. Robert Williams, Paslor. 

First Church ol Christ, Scientist & Reading Rm. Rio 173 and 
Harden, Antioch, Phone (847) 355-1 196. Sunday School, Sunday 
Church Service 10.30am, Wednesday, 7:30pm 

Beautiful Savior Evangelical Lutheran Church, 554 Parkway, 
Antioch. Phone (847) 265-2450 Sunday Worship at 9am, Sunday 
School, High School & Adult Bible Classes 10:30am. 

Heritage Lutheran Church. Lindenhurst Civic Center, 1949 OW Elm 
Rd.. Lindenhurst. (847) 356-1766. Sunday service 1000 am, Sunday 
School & Bible Class 9 00 am (summer scheduto - 9 00 am Sunday) 
Rev, Mark W. Anderson, pastor. 

SL Ignatius EpbcopaL 977 Main SI Phone (847) 3950652. Lav Moss 
7:30am, Hgh Mass 930am Sunday School 4 Nusory MOam 

AnUoch Evangelical Free Church. 750 Highvtow Dr. Phone (647) 395- 
4117. Saturday Evening Service 530 pm Sunday School 9:45am, 
Sunday Worship 8:30, 11:00, Children's Church 11am. Nursery both 
services Awana Club. Senior Paslor David M. Groleau. 

SL Stephen Lutheran Church (ELCA). 1 1 55 Hillside Ave. Phone (847) 
395X3359. Sunday Worship, 8 & 9.30am. Rev. Robert Trendel, Interim 
Pastor. 

Christian Die Fellowship Assemblies of God Church. 41625 Deep 
Lake Rd., Antioch. Phone (B47) 395-8572. Sunday School (all ages) 
9am, Sunday Morning Worship 10am, Chidrens Church 10am, 
Sunday Evening Worship 6:30pm, Wednesday Worship & Children's 
Program 7am, Tues. Women* Fellowship & Bibte Study 9- 11 :30am. 
Jeff Brussaly, Pastor. 



Chain ol Lakes Community Bible Church. 23201 W, Grass Lake 
Rd.. Antioch, Phone (847) 83&O103. Sunday Worship 815 and 10.45. 
Sunday School 945. Children's Church 10:45. Ybuth, Women's, Awana 
A Small Group ministries. Pastor, Paul McMinimy. 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod). 25100 W. 
Grand Ave. (Rle. 59 & 132), Lako Villa. (847) 356-5158. Sunday 
Worship 8:15 & 10:45am; Sunday School (3 and up) and Bible 
Study 9:30am. Christian Preschool. Rev. John Zellner, Pastor. 

Lighthouse Church ol Antioch 

554 Parkway Ave., Antioch, IL (847) B38-061B. Saturday Evening 
Service 7:00 p.m. Adventure Club lor Kids, Adult Bible Study 
Saturday Evening 8:00 p.m. Monday Evening Blblo Study 7:00 
p.m. Thursday Evening FTSD Support Group 7:00 p.m Senior 
Pastor Tom Bar Imer. 



Dan Dugenske, Director 
This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 



Strang Funeral Home of Antioch l, 262) 



n l 




Nathan Zeller 
Boys Soccer 

Timothy Clutter, Steven Colletri, 
Lance Liebert, Jason Love, Matthew Mi- 
clea, Nicholas Placko, Zachary Pratt 
Cheerleading 

Shannon Day, Regina Pelz, 
Danielle Stah!, Jennifer Wierzbicki 
Football 

Luke Denoma, Ryan Dussault, 
Harry Gl;inos, William Hazel, Adam 
Niles, David Ostmann, Jeffrey Petersen, 
Michael Pocius, Daniel Schneider, Kris 
Vanderkooy, Eric White 
Girls Tennis 

Kristen Jensen, Silvia Skrip- 
kauskaite, Heather Zeman 
Girls Volleyball 

Kelly Gofron, Jainie Knuth, Megan 
Kotlarz, Emily Niles, Katianne 
Pechauer, Jorudan Phillips, Lauren 
Reynolds 
Boys Cross Country 

Frederick Anhalt, Bradley Groih, 
Ryan Hlinak, Eric Langner, Joseph Lef- 
felman, Sean Pondell 
Girls Cross Country 

Heidi Schramm 



SALE 

JACKETS • PANTS 
SWEATERS . 

SALE 50% "TO 70% OFF 



SKI 
EQUIPMENT 

SNOWBOARDS 

SALE 50% T0 70% OFF 

X-C SKIS 

SNOWSHOES 

BAGS 

GOGGLES 

GLOVES 

UNDERWEAR 

SALE ALL 30% OFF 

-ALL MARKOOWNS 
OFF RE TAIL PRICES- 

ski & 

sports chalet 



5039 6th Ave. 
Harborside, Kenosha 
658-8515 



Class AA boys 

basketball 

pairings 

Waukegan Sectional 

Mon.,Fcb.28 

Game 1 — (17) Wauconda at ( 1 6) 

Highland Park 

Tue., Feb. 29 

Game 2 —Winner Game 1 at (1) 

Warren 

Game 3 — (9) Waukegan at (8) 

Grant 

Game 4 — (13) North Chicago at 

(4) Lake Zurich 

Game 5 — (12) Carmel at (5) 

Grayslake 

Wed., Mar. 1 

Game 6 — (15) Round Lake, at (2) 

Zion-Benton 

Game 7— (10) Mundeleln at (7) 

Stevenson 

Game 8 — (14) Llbertyville at (3) 

Deerfield 

Game 9 — (1 1) Antioch at (6) 

Lake Forest (H.S.) 

Fri.,Mar.3 

Game 10 — Winner Game 2 vs. 

Winner Game 3 

Game 11 — Winner Game 4 vs. 

Winner Game 5 

Game 12 — Winner Game 6 vs. 

Winner Game 7 

Game 13 — Winner Game 8 vs. 

Winner Game 9 

Tue., Mar. 7 

Game 14 — Winner Game 10 vs. 

Winner Game 1 1 

Wed., Mar. 8 

Game 15 — Winner Game 12 vs. 

Winner Game 13 

Fri„ Mar. 10 

Game 16 — Winner Game 14 vs. 

Winner Game 15 

Note: All games 7:30 p.m. 




T1 

Depend on 
your hometown 
professionals 
for all your 
insurance needs ! 

Life • Health 

Home 

Auto • Business 

Osmond Insurance 

Service Ltd. 

976 Hillside 

Antioch, Illinois 

60002 
(847) 395-2500 



vPEKINv 



! 



February 25, 20Q0 



SPORTS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A1 1 



Eckenstahler among three Redbirds named MVC preseason all-conference | 



Illinois State seniors Ryan Dun- 
cheon and Eric Eckenstahler and ju- 
nior Jared Dufault were named to the 
2000 preseason all-conference team 
and the Redbirds were picked to fin- 
ish fifth out of eight teams in the Mis- 
souri Valley Conference coaches' 
preseason poll in a press release. 

Duncheon, a preseason all- 
America selection and two-time All- 
Valley First Team selection, is com- 
ing off a stellar 1999 campaign in 
which he led the Redbirds in batting 
average, homers and runs batted in 
for the second consecutive season. A 
native of Petersburg, Duncheon 
broke the ISU single-season record 
for homers with 23 and also estab- 
lished a new single season mark for 
on-base percentage (.500). Only four 
homers and 21 runs batted in shy of 



the ISU careers records for those re- 
spective categories, Duncheon 
needs 25 homers during the 2000 
campaign to become the Valley's all- 
time home run king. 

A six-foot seven southpaw from 
Lindenhurst, Eckenstahler returned 
to Illinois State for his senior cam- 
paign despite being selected by the 
Detroit Tigers in the 32nd round of 
the 1999 Major League Baseball ama- 
teur Draft Eckenstahler led the Red- 
bird staff in wins and strikeouts while 
also establishing a new ISU career 
mark for compete-games (11) en 
route to AU-Valley First-Team honors. 

A native of Rockford, Dufault 
garnered All-Valley Honorable Men- 
tion honors in 1999 after moving into 
the starting position in right field. An 
excellent all-around athlete, Dufault 



led the Redbirds in triples, ranked 
second on the squad in slugging per- . 
centage and total bases and ranked 
third in on-base percentage, runs 
scored, hits and runs batted in. Du- 
fault's success carried over into the 
summer campaign as he was unani- 
mously selected the MVP of the Clark 
C. Griffith Collegiate Baseball League 
and named a Summer Ail-American 
by Baseball America after setting 
league records for runs batted in (42) 
and hits (61). 

In a unanimous vote, Wichita 
State was selected by Valley coaches 
to win the 2000 regular-season tide. 

Last year, the Shockers, who fin- 
ished with 59-14 record capped by 
the program's 18th NCAA tourna- 
ment appearance, won WSU's 14th 
consecutive Valley crown. 



Besides being the Valley favorite, 
Wichita State holds a preseason 
ranking of 12 in the USA Today Base- 
ball Weekly /ESPN Coaches' Top 25 
Poll. Baseball American picked the 
Shockers as the 13th team in its Col- 
lege Top 25. 

Back in the MVC, Evansville, 
which returns all of its starters from 
a 32-24 campaign in 1999, was 
tabbed as the No. 2 team in the 
league. The Purple Aces received 54 
points, including one first place vote. 

Just four points behind, South- 
west Missouri State fills that third slot 
in the coaches' poll. The Bears, 38-19 
last season, made their fourth NCAA 
tournament berth in five years. 

Another Valley team to partici- 
pate in the 1999 NCAA Tournament, 
Creighton snagged one more point 



than Illinois State in this year's pre- 
season poll. The Jays, who finished 
38-25 last season, one-upped the 
Redbirds and their 35-24 record of a 
yearago. 

The No. 6 team in the preseason 
poll is Southern Illinois with 24 
points followed closely by Bradley 
with 22 points. 

Northern Iowa and Indiana State 
round out the group with 15 and 14 
points, respectively. 

The preseason all-conference 
team features four student-athletes 
from Wichita State and three-stu- 
dent athletes from Illinois State. 

Five of the student-athletes se- 
lected to the preseason all-confer-,, 
ence team earned first-team, all- 
conference recognition last sea- 
son. 



SPORTS DIGEST 



The Lindenhurst Fastpitch 
Softball team is still looking for 
14-and-under players for the up- 
coming season. Note: Players are 
still eligible if their 15th birthday 
falls after January 1. 

Contact directors Steve . 
Haenchen (265-0749) or Mitch Kot- 
larz (356-9547) or manager Jim Ku- 
lakowski (265-0222) for further de- 
tails. 

Team practices are presently 
held every Saturdayfrom 10 a.m.-3 
p.m. at B.J. Hooper School off Sand 
Lake Rd. in Lindenhurst. 

For anyone still interested, hit- 
ting and pitching camps are avail- 
able at The Pro Cut Training 
Center in Lake Villa. 

This camp will cover, strength 
and speed training for hitters, fun- 
damental training, arm and bat 
speed evaluation, much more by 
certified instructors. 

The maximum number of stu- 
dents per session is limited from six 
to eight players and is available for 
all ages. Spots are going fast, so hur- 
ry up and register by calling (630) 
833-4018. The cost of the camp in- 
cludes two packages; hitting or 
pitching only-$50 (includes four 
one-hour workouts); and, hitting 
and pitching-$90 (includes four 
two-hour workouts). 

Camps will continue to run 
each Sunday in February. You can 
register at anytime during the dura- 
tion of the camp. 

The Harmony Snowmobile 
Club and Wllmot Mountain 
would like to extend an invitation 
for you to cover the most unique 
winter sport activity to hit our 
area. On Saturday, March 18th 
and Sunday, March 19th, Harmo- 
ny and Wilmot will be hosting the 
second annual "Grip-It and 
Rip -It SnowClImb," uphill four- 
lane snowmobile drag race. This 
activity is unique to the midwest. 
As a result of last year's populari- 
ty, the event has been extended to 
two days. 

This year in conjunction to the 
event, Harmony will be hosting a 
food drive to support the local 
McHenry FISH Food Pantry. All 
racers and spectators are asked to 



donate a non-perishable food item 
to FISH. 

Now is an opportunity to get in 
an support this event and held feed 
the needy. This is an opportunity 
to participate and show commu- 
nity support. Where else has an 
event of this magnitude been 
done in this area and you have 
the opportunity to support and 
mingle with others. 

Gates will open at 8 a.m. on 
both days. Think of it, mountain 
drag racing. All this hosted by the 
local hometown club, The Harmo- 
ny Snowmobile Club, in Johnsburg. 
Support the club, the FISH Food 
Pantry and the sport this area is 
noted for. 

And, Lake County Baseball 
is looking for teams to form a new 
spring league for the 2000 baseball 
season. The league will be national- 
ly franchised under NBC (National 
Baseball Congress) and playing in 
the league will lead to national 
competition in the NBC World Se- 
ries. 

The league will begin play as 
soon as the weather breaks, contin- 
ue until early June, and be finished 
in time for teams to play tourna- 
ment ball during the summer 
months. Any coach or manager of a 
10,11, 12, 13, 14, 15 or 15 year old 
team that would like more informa- 
tion on this new league should con- 
tact Lake County Baseball at 945- 
9606. 

Great Lakes Adaptive 
Sports Association is offering 
an Adaptive Aerobic Class. This 
class is for the individuals who 
would like to register for a tradi- 
tional aerobics class but may not 
have the balance or ability to par- 
ticipate in such a class due to 
such impairments as arthritis, 
multiple sclerosis, spinal cord in- 
jury, retinitis pigmentosa etc. In- 
structors have been trained at the 
Rehabilitation Institute of Chica- 
go with evening classes conduct- 
ed at the Condell Intergenera- 
tional Gymnasium. Individuals 
need not have a disability to par- 
ticipate. For further information, 
contact the Great Lakes Adaptive 
Sports Association at 249-8685. 



CLC womens hoops holds off Moraine Valley 



LAKE COUNTY 
BOWLING ASSOCIATION 



(Results after first week of 
71st Annual LCBA Tourna- 
ment) 

At- Bertrand Lanes, 
Waukegan 

(96 teams competing) 
Team results 

1. Goza Stars, Bertrand Lanes- 
3,546 

2. Team #14, Lakes Bowl-3,379 

3. Perdect Impressions, Lakes 
Bowl-3,374 

4. Filter Brite, Harbor Lanes- 
3,374 

5. Classic Chevrolet, Bertrand 
Lanes-3,367 



Note: Low score still In the 

inoney-3,250 

Leading scratch team and 
score 

-Car Quest from LlbertyvlUe 
Lanes-3,160 
Individuals 

Dan Krostal from 9 Pin Kelem 
fired a perfect 300 score in his 
third game. There were seven 
700 series' with Gary Clay from 
Berry Tire leading the pack 
with a 738. 

Note: The tournament re- 
sumes this Saturday with two 
squads competing. 



The CLC women's basketball 
team held off a late Moraine Valley 
rally before prevailing 60-57. Corrie 
Svendson poured in a game-high 22 
points, including 17 in the second 
half and Aja Brown chipped in 16, in- 
cluding 10-for-14 from the free- 
throw line for Lake County (9-19, 5-7 
Skyway). 

CLC trailed the hosts by. 15 
points with 10 minutes remaining. 
Krissy Schultze nailed two free- 
throws with 17 seconds left in regu- 
lation to preserve the victory. Svend- 
son also grabbed six rebounds and 
collected three steals and for her ef- 
forts, was named the CLC Athlete of 
The Week. 

Meanwhile, leading scorer Jim 
Nilles pumped in 36 points, includ- 
ing seven trey's, but the Lancers (1- 
29, 0-12) fell to Moraine Valley 108- 
81 in the regular-season finale. CLC 
opened the first-round Region IV 



tournament at Elgin Tuesday. 

And speaking of hard work and 
effort, The College of Lake Coun- 
ty Athletic Department is proud to 
announce that the following athletes 
have earned a 3.00 GPA or higher 
and have thus been named to the 
dean's list at the college for the first 
semester. 

Scoring big with a perfect 4.00 
GPA 

Stacey Haseman and Erin 
Riepe-womens basketball; Gabriele 
Nichols, womens tennis; Kathleen 
Aldridge, cross country; Nathan 
Goodwin, mens tennis. 
Baseball 

Brad Bruntyn, Brian Calhoun, 
Keith Colosi, Reggie Hughes, Mike 
Kaywood, Ryan Liebgott, Barth Mor- 
reale 
M. Basketball 

Jim Nilles, Michael Stem- 
Rouse, BillYundt 



W. Basketball 

Alyceson Kudla, Krissy Schulze 
Golf 

Anthony Jager, Joshua Navarro 
M. Soccer 

Carlos Gomez 
W. Soccer 

Nicole Brochu, Rachel Cash- 
man, Sandi Coutts, Jessica Eder, 
Jaime Pospichal, Susan Woodruff 
Softball 

Alyceson Kudla 
M. Tennis 

Brian Carter, Daniel Clarke, 
David Leckman 
W. Tennis 

Laura Bosserman, Michelle 
Gottschalk, Lisa Jurica, Heather 
Lawrence 
Volleyball 

Amy Emskamp, Jessica Runge, 
Nellie Whitaker 
Wrestling 

Jason Huntley, Scott Ludwig 




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A 12 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



February 25, 2000 



Clemen's time 

Show brings Twain's message to 21st century 



By STEVE PETERSON 
Staff Reporter 



Wearing a white three- 
piece suit, with a dark 
tie, gray hair, mus- 
tache and a guitar on- 
one knee, it would not be too hard 
to mistake Jim Post for a modern- 
day Samuel Clemens, aka Mark 
"Twain, 

Add to that look music and 
storytelling skills that have 
brought Post nationwide acclaim, 
and no wonder some youth at 
Wauconda's Transfiguration 
Church fund-raiser thought Twain 
was in the presence. Perhaps some 
adults, who may not be willing to 
admit it, did too. 

"It was an opportunity for 
many areas of church life to come 
together, from the school board to 
the parents group and the Knights 
of Columbus," said Rev. Thomas 
McGuire, pastor. 

"My 6-year-old still thinks it • 
was Mark Twain. We were very 
pleased with the turnout," said Jill 
Ryan, one of the organizers. 

Approximately 500 people at- 
tended the weekend events. One 
included a dinner. It was served by 
the Knights of Columbus, at 
Transfiguration Church. 

Post's performances were 
across the street at Millcreek Ban- 
quets. CD's were popular, and stu- 
dents in grades second through 
eighth drew pictures of Twain, and 
those will continue to be on sale at 
Transfiguration School. 

Post, who lives in Galena, and 



his wife Janet Smith, have per- 
formed at the Smithsonian Insti- 
tute as well as in Vienna Austria. 
Post has been telling stories such 
as Clemens' life for 53 years in his 
strong, clear tenor voiced. His per- 
formances include much audience 
participation. 

"There are two kinds of men," 
said Post, er Twain. "Men who are 
in jail and those whom I do not 
know why they are not in jail." 

He told the story of one of 
Twain's performances in the 
Northeast. A proud lawyer had his 
hands in his pockets, all straight 
laced and proper— "a rarity for a 
lawyer to have his hands in his 
own pockets," Post said. 

Clemens was born in 1835 in 
Florida, Mo., a year of Halley's 
Comet. Clemens admired his un- 
cle, who never appeared in his 
work, more so than his father. He 
also liked the surroundings of 
Hannibal, Mo., telling how charac- 
ter Huckleberry Finn would have 
adventures on a raft on the Missis- 
sippi. His uncle had slaves, but 
since Clemens would dine with 
them, and learn from a slave 
named Daniel, he did not see 
them as such. 

"When Lincoln freed the black 
men, he also freed the white men," 
Post said. 

Post's show included digs at 
many institutions, which Clemens 
attacked with his literary skill. Re- 
ligion and school were included. 

He told ofthelureofthe 
mighty Mississippi River, which 
influences 33 states. He told of 




Jim Post of Galena portrays Mark Twain in Mark Twain and the Laughing River at Wauconda's Mill 
Creek Banquet Halt as part of a fund-raiser for Transfiguration School. Post's wife, Janet Smith Post, 
looks on. — Photo by Candace H. Johnson 



how raftsmen had a reputation of 
being skilled in cussing. He told of 
how John Hanacks, a free black, 
would celebrate with joy when the 
two steamboats a week came into 
the port of Hannibal. 

"Tom Blackenship was a half- 
blood Indian, whom my mother 



thought was not good company. 
That made him quadruple in im- 
portance to me," Post said. 

"The river put the devil in me, 
but I let him set up housekeep- 
ing," said Post, quoting Clemens. 
Each morning, we would go to 
Holiday Hill, which was 300 feet 



above the river. Across it were the 
forests of Illinois, which were say- 
ing, 'come over here, skip school.' 
Janet Smith Post's background 
includes playing cello in a Col- 
orado Springs community orches- 
tra. She is currently working on a ] 
novel, "Prisoners of Hope. " 




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THEATRE REVIEW 

Shakespeare lives in 'Midsummer 
Night's Dream' 7 B6 



MOVIE REVIEW 

Whole bunch of laughs: 
The Whole Nine Yards7B6 



KIDSKORNER 

Games, puzzles 
and fun / B1 1 



SECTION 



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Section 




Lakeland Newspapers February 25 - March 2, 2000 

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ithffje Winter months keepingyou in and limiting the 
exercise you get those commercials for health clubs ' 
and fitness^pas get more and more under your skin. 

You'literallyjfeel the extra weight you put on oyer the 
Jast'couple ofjjweeks and you start to think that there's 
really 1 no wayjto reverse this trend. 

"The answer is not as hard as people might think," 
Chris Adsit, manager and physical trainer of Gold's 
Gym in Gurnee, said. 

Willi the motivation to work cut dwindling 
amongst most Americans, physical trainers have their 
work cut out as they fight to keep their clients in shape. 

With most people, the problem with staying physi- 
cally fit is finding the time to exercise. Careers, family 
and everyday engagements hamper a person's ability to 
find room in their schedule to work out. 

"I got up in the morning, got dressed, got the kids 

By MICHAEL J. B1Y0NA 
Staff Reporter 

, . dressed.sent them off, to school, and went to work," Ten 
lenke, a Mundelein resident, said. "I never had enough 
time to work out, or at least I thought anyway." 

The first step to a more physically fit world is to ad- 
mit it is important to exercise. 

A person may find that he or she is not capable of 
doing some things they might have done not so long 
ago or they might just be consciously telling them- 
selves, "I'm not feeling as good as I could be. I really 
need to start exercising." 

"When I noticed I was exhausted after making a 
dinner like macaroni and cheese, I thought I should re- 
ally get into shape," Jenke said. 

Once a person finally makes the decision to start 
exercising regularly they have an unlimited amount of 
options to choose from to get them started. 

Although exercising on your own by running, jog- 
ging, lifting weights or joining a pick-up basketball 
game is the easiest way to go, it can also be the easiest 
way to quit. 

"When I worked out on my own I would usually for- 
get or just tell myself I was tired," Jenke said. 

Joining a gym or health club is another way. 

Health clubs offer a wide range of exercise equip- 
ment for every part of your body. 

Machines for your triceps, biceps, abdomen, neck 
and every other muscle are usually available at most 



Gold's Gym Personal Trainer Rob Brown of Gurnee helps Wadsworth resident Patti Becker with her circuit training 
Feb. 21 at the Gold's Gym in Gumee.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



health clubs. 

Clubs can also offer swimming pools, steam rooms, indoor 
tracks and Jacuzzis to relax in after working out. 

Along with all the equipment, health clubs can offer different 
aerobic classes to help people stay in shape. These classes can 
teach people the proper way to exercise and help them stay mo- 
tivated to. continue their exercise schedule. 

One way to stay motivated is to use a physical trainer. 

Personal trainers are certified trainers that are hired to help a 
person get into shape and keep them in shape. The trainers can 
create an exercise piogram, help with those exercises, give ad- 
vice about a person's diet and, most importantly, motivate a per- 
son to continue their fitness schedule. 



"You have to show them the little victories," Lawrence Scire, 
certified athletic trainer, said. "Everyday is a victory, an accom- 
plishment. The little victories add up to the eventual outcome." 

Finding a trainer Is extremely easy. Most gyms and health 
clubs have them on staff and some trainers even advertise in the 
newspaper or on the radio and television. Finding a good trainer 
is another question. 

According to Adsit, there are a lot of trainers but not all of 
them have gained their certification through good accredited 
schools. 

"Becoming a trainer can be very difficult. When we look to 

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B2/ Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



February 25, 2000 



FROM PAGE Bl 



ATTENTION 



tion of the trainers," 
Adsit said. 

According to Ad- 
sit, after a person 
finds where a trainer 
has been certified he 
or she can then use 
the Internet to help 
them make their de- 
cision. 

"You can surf the 
web to check out the 
home pages of the 
schools where the 
trainers were certi- 
fied," Adsit said. 

Although it still 
helps to do your 
homework before us- 
ing a trainer, most big 
name health clubs 
and gyms will have 
highly certified train- 
ers. 

"You're pretty 
much assured that a 
good gym will have 
good trainers," Adsit 
said. "Quality gym, 
quality instruction." 
Rob Brown, a personal trainer at Gold's Gym Another aspect to 
in Gurnee, keeps a watchful eye on his clien- look at when choosing 
t's workout. — Photo by Sandy Bressner a personal trainer is 

how well you get along 
with that particular 
person. 
"I always thought you needed to 
hate your trainer in order for him to 
be good," Jim Gillespie, Gurnee resi- 
dent and YMCA member, explained. 
"A few years ago I ran into a guy that 
said he was a personal trainer. I 
started working out with him and 
we're actually good friends still to- 
day. You can actually find a nice 
trainer." 




hire someone we look at whether or 
not they came from a more nation- 
ally accredited institution," Adsit ex- 
plained. "Some places (schools) are 
way too easy." 

So how does a person know 
whether or not a personal trainer is 
a good one? 

"The public needs to take an ac- 
tive role in finding out the certifica- 



Personalities are very important 
when looking at the relationship be- 
tween a trainer and his or her client, 
according to Adsit. 

"Trainers become so close and 
intimate with these people. If you 
don't connect, there's problems," 
Adsit said. 

According to Gillespie, once you 
start exercising you can't just stop 
after a few days or weeks. 

"It's easy to just decide that 
you're going to go out and exercise," 
Gillespie said. "You have to try and 
keep going, to make it a routine of 
your everyday life." 

Finding the time to create that 
routine during the day can be diffi- 
cult at first, but it seems like sec- 
ond nature after a while, stated 
Jenke. 

"At first I thought that I'd stop 
working out after a few weeks be- 
cause I just didn't have any room 
in my day," Jenke said. "I just 
made it into a routine by accident. 
One day I thought 'Hey, this isn't 
so bad. I could keep doing this.' So 
I did." 

According to Adsit, once a per- 
son looks into what the trainer has 
done the relationship, along with the 
client's health, will take off from 
there. 

"You sit down and ask 'What 
makes you so confident that you can 
help me?' And you see if it works 
out," Adsit explained. 

Exercising and staying physically 
fit is not an easy thing to do or con- 
tinue doing, but with the help of a 
personal trainer the journey can be a 
lot easier. 

"I'd work out on my own from 
time to time but after I got a trainer, 
and a good one too, I was motivated 
lo keep going," Gillespie explained. 
"I felt like I was letting him down if I 
didn't show up. I wasn't even think- 
ing about myself." 



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FILING STATUS 

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Your filing status depends on whether you are married or unmarried on 
December 31st of a tax year. If you live apart from your spouse and meet 
certain tests, you may be considered unmarried for the entire year. If you are 
divorced under a final decree by the last day of the year, you are considered 
unmarried for the entire year. 

• ANNULLED MARRIAGES 

If you obtain an annulment that declares your marriage never existed, you are 
considered unmarried for this and any previous tax year. You must amend your 
tax returns for all the tax years not affected by the statute of limitations for 
filing a return to show this change in marital status. 

• HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD 

Single. or separated taxpayers should check to see if they qualify for head of 
household filing status. This filing status allows a taxpayer to take a higher 
standard deduction, possibly be eligible for a lower tax bracket and perhaps 
qualify for the earned income credit. 



Good luck is a day 
without chain letters 



Dear Reader, 
Let me begin by saying 
that this is not a chain let- 
ter. Chain letters cause me 
to have an intense urge to shred pa- 
per... with my teeth. 

This is better. This is a newspa- 
per column. Newspaper columns 
are GOOD LUCK. 

This is TRUE. If you don't be- 
lieve me, call Dave Barry's accoun- 
tant. 

And not only can a newspa- 
per column bring good luck for 
some columnists, they can bring 
GOOD LUCK FOR YOU, too. For 
instance: 

1. If you put this newspaper 
column on your refrigerator with a 
magnet, you will make a colum- 
nist's mother proud. 

2. If you click your heels to- 
gether while holding it and say, 
"There's no place like home," your 
family will finally begin to pay at- 
tention to you. Close attention. 
Maybe they will even invite others 
to pay attention to you, such as a 
doctor of psychiatry. 

3. If you hold this column up. 
to your ear, you can hear the 
ocean. (For those of you who have 
never heard the ocean, it sounds 
like paper crinkling.) 

Still, you may not consider 
those things REALLY GOOD 
LUCK. Many people spell "REAL- 
LY GOOD LUCK" this way: M-O- 
N-E-Y. Which is why you should 
make copies of this column and 
pass it out to all of your friends 
and tell them to do the same. Be- 
cause then you might have REAL- 
LY GOOD LUCK. Here is just 
some of the REALLY GOOD LUCK 
that could happen to you. You 
could: 

4. Become rich by selling 
shares in your internet company 
that has never made a profit 

5. Spill hot McDonald's coffee 
in your lap, and then discover that 
American courts will pay you mil- 
lions for being a klutz 

6. Look outside your window 
and see a leprechaun burying his 
pot of gold in your backyard 

Of course, you could also get 
run over by the Publisher's Clear- 
inghouse prize patrol vehicle. 
That, by the way, would NOT be 
good luck. 

Oh, and did I mention that 
every lime you recommend this 




LIFE'S 
A BEAR 

Donna Abear 



column to someone, an angel gets 
his wings? 

Also, you may be helping a 
dying columnist if you give this 
column to as many people as pos- : 
sible. Of course, the columnist 
that wrote this is not dying, but it 
could happen. Seen Mike Royko, 
lately? How about Erma Bombeck? 
Okay, then. 

Remember, you do not have to 
do this. But then YOU WILL HAVE 
TO LIVE WITH YOUR DECISION 
FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE. . . 
Someday, when the poor columnist 
is gone, you may wonder if you were 
somehow responsible. All I can say 
about that is. . . let's hope none of 
her relatives are named "VTto Cor- 
leone." 

Of course, maybe none of 
that worries you. Maybe YOUR 
name is "Vito Corleone." In any 
case, feel free to throw this page 
in the garbage when you're 
through with it. I'm sure nothing 
will happen. 

But don't blame me if you sud- 
denly have BAD LUCK, like these 
people: 

Joe H. Adbeef once threw a 
newspaper column away. The next 
day, his cow died. 

Noah Momoney crumpled up 
a newspaper column and attempt- 
ed to score in an office wastebas- 
ket basketball game. He missed 
and beaned his boss, Watson Mi- 
hed. Noah did not get a raise that*"* 
year. 

Personally, if I were you, I 
wouldn't take the chance. Why, just 
last week, I heard that someone read 
this column and then used it to pa- 
per-train their puppy. 
Thanks a lot, MOM! 
Yours not so truly, 
Donna Breaka Dechain 



Questions or comments for 
Donna Abear can be sent to: P.O. Box 
391, Antioch, IL 60002, or by e-mail: 
donna@lifesabear.com. Also, be sure 
to check out her new web site at 
http:llwww. lifesabear.com. 



Speedskating Classic to be held 



The fifth annual WinterBreak 
Speedskating Classic will be held on 
February 27, from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. 
Coordinated by the City of Chicago, 
Amateur Speed Skating Association 
of Illinois, and ComEd the speed 
skating competition is open to 
everyone interested in ice-skating. 

The races will take place at the 
free-admission rink, located at State 
and Randolph. Skaters aged three 
and up are invited to register for the 
event and enjoy races around the 
1 1 1.2 meter track. Participants will 
be categorized according to age and 
experience level. Competitors are 
asked to wear a bicycle, in-line skat- 
ing or hockey helmet, long sleeves 
and gloves while racing. 

Each participant will receive an 



official T-shirt, certificates of partici- 
pation and a goody bag. Medals will 
be awarded to the top three finish- 
ers in each age group for each dis- 
tance. 

Registration forms are available 
at the Mayor's Office of Special 
Events, 312/744-3315, or the ComEd 
Skate on State. The entry fee is $15. 

The public is welcome and view 
the competition during special 
event hours or skate after 3 p.m. 
Regular hours or operation for 
ComEd Skate on State are 9 a.m. - 
7:15 p.m., Thursdays 9 a.m. until 
9:45 p.m. Skate rental is available, 
$3 for adult and $2 for children. 

For more information on the 
ring, call the Mayor's Office of Spe- 
cial Events Hotline at 312/744-1149. 



Grant-writing workshop offered 

IAC and how to secure grant fund- 
ing for them. 

Following the workshop, IAC 
staff members will be available for 
telephone consultations for sched- 
uled appointments at the Council's 
Chicago office. 

For more information or to reg- 
ister for the workshop, pleace call 
432-1808. 



The Suburban Fine Arts Cen- 
ter (SFAC), 1913 Sheridan Rd., 
Highland Park, is presenting a 
grant-writing workshop Saturday, 
February 26, at the SFAC from 10 
a.m. - 12 p.m. This free workshop, 
presented in cooperation with the 
Illinois Arts Council (IAC), will 
provide information about pro- 
grams and services offered by the 



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February 25, 2000 



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FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B3 



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Drake Theatre to present 'Heartbreak House' 



The Drake Theatre at Barat 
College, proudly presents 
George Bernard Shaw's 
classic Heartbreak House. 
Performances of Heartbreak House 
are Saturday, Feb. 26. at 8 p.m. and 
Sunday, Feb. 27 at 3 p.m. Tickets 
are $9 for general admission and $7 
for students/seniors. All seats are 
reserved. 

Heartbreak House is one of 
Shaw's greatest plays. It exam- 
ines a group of cultivated intelli- 
gentsia that has lost control of' - 
their destiny and plays dangerous 
games of love as civilization drifts 
towards self-destruction. The 
heartbreak begins and gets worst 
until the house breaks out 
through the windows and be- 
comes all England, with all Eng- 
land's heartbroken. The produc- 
tion is directed by Karla Koski- 
nen, and features Susie Anderson 
as Ellie, Ben Seibert as Captain 




Pops Sets Stage for High 
School Band Trip to China 



Ben Seibert (Captain Shotover) Susie Anderson (Ellie) are fea- 
tured at the Drake Theatre at Barat College. 



Shotover, and Kara Lynn Szostek 
asHesione. 

The Drake Theatre at Barat Col- 
lege is located at 700 E. Wesdeigh 



Rd., Lake Forest. To order Uckets, 
or for more information, call the 
Drake Theatre Box Office at 604- 
6344. 



Pops of Highwood, 214 Green 
Bay Rd., Highwood, will swing for a 
good cause, March 3rd, as the High- 
land Park High School Jazz Band 
takes to the stage to raise funds for 
its upcoming trip to China. 

All proceeds go direcdy to the 
band, so attendees can write 
' checks direcdy to the group. Tick- 
ets are $25 per person for adults, 
$10 per person for those 18 and un- 
der for performances at 7 p.m. and 
9 p.m. 

Under the direction of interna- 
tionally-known band leader, Dr. 
James Hile, the 20-piece swing en- 
semble will travel overseas to pre- 
sent a program of American Jazz at 
the invitation of the Chinese gov- 
ernment, March 23 to 31. The per- 
formance at Pops will help defray 
traveling expenses for the students, • 



estimated at $2,500 a person. 

"When we heard about the trip, 
we jumped at the chance to play a 
part," says Tom Verhey, owner of 
Pops, "Out philosophy is to encour- 
age young people to become part of 
the live music scene and we're 
proud to showcase this exciting 
group of young people be- 
fore they leave to pre- 
sent American Jazz to 
the Chinese people." 

Food and 
beverage menus 
will be available 
for those who 
wish to pur- 
chase refresh- 
ments. Free park 
ing is available. 
For information, 
call 226-1313., 




CROSSWORD 



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HOROSCOPE 



Aries - March 21/April 20 
Try to be patient when waiting for 
an important decision at work. 
Pushing the higher-ups to make a 
choice only will make you look bad. 
A loved one wants to introduce you 
to someone interesting. While 
you're nervous, say yes. This new 
person could end up being a close 
friend. Virgo plays an important role 
on Friday. 

Taurus - April 21/May 21 
There are a lot of demands on your 
time this wetto, Taurus. While all 
you want to do is stay home, you 
have to help others out. Don't get 
upset. It's not going to be as tedious 
as you think. You'll actually have a 
good time with these people.. A 
loved one offers you romantic ad- 
vice. Take it. 

Gemini - May 22/June 21 
An old friend calls you out of the. 
blue this week, Gemini. White it's 
fun to gossip, try to find out what 
this person really wants. He or she 
needs something from you. Try to 
be helpful. That special someone 
has a surprise for you late In the 
week. Enjoy, because you deserve 
it. 

Cancer - June 22/July 22 
Don't let a difficult situation at work 
get to you. Just deal with it, and 
move on. You shouldn't bring this - 
problem home with you. Your per- 
sonal life Is much more important 
than work. Don't forget that. A close 
friend needs some advice. Be there 
for him or her. Virgo plays a key 
role. 

Leo - July 23/August 23 
Try not to be too outgoing when you 
meet a new co-worker early in the 
week. Your energy could make this 
person nervous. Try to tone it down 
until you know him or her better. A 
loved one needs your help with a 
family matter. Do what you can for 
him or her. 

Virgo - Aug 24/Sept 22 
A lot of people are depending on 
you this week. So, don't get distract- 
ed from the task at hand. Stay fo- ■ 
cused, and work diligently. That's 
the only way to get things done. 
Don't, worry — things will calm down 
by the week's end. Sagittarius plays 
an important role on Tuesday. 

Libra- Sept 23/Oct 23 
While you like to be in charge, Li- 
bra, that's not how It's going to be 
when it comes to a business situa- . 
tion this week. Let the person who 
knows exactly what's going on take 
control. Do what he or she says, 
and try to learn something. This will 
be an eye-opening experience for 
you. Scorpio plays a key role. 

Scorpio - Oct 24/Nov 22 
Don't wear your heart on your 



sleeve when you meet someone , 
interesting early in the week. - 
Showing your feelings so soon will 
scare this person off. Just try to 
stay calm, and be yourself. That's 
the way to win his or her affections. 
Capricorn plays an important role 
on Saturday. 

Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 
Don't let a minor financial prob- 
lem upset you, Sagittarius. It's 
nothing serious, and you should- 
n't worry about such an insignifi- 
cant setback. A close friend 
needs your help with a personal 
problem. Try to do what you can 
for him or her. Your efforts will be 
appreciated. 

Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 
Don't be too harsh with a close 
friend who gets into trouble. He or 
she is scared and needs your help 
— not your criticism. Do your best 
to rectify the situation. Your efforts 



will be rewarded. That special 
someone asks you an important 
question. Answer him or her hon- 
estly. 

Aquarius -Jan 21/Feb 18 
Don't just go along with your co- 
workers when you think that they're 
making a mistake. Tell them how 
you feel, and try to make them un- 
derstand the situation. They will lis- 
ten to what you have to say. A 
loved one gets you involved in a 
family project. While you don't want 
to help, you must. Try to make the 
best of it. 

Pisces - Feb 19/March 20 
You're In the spotlight at work early 
In the week, Pisces. Don't be ner- 
vous. You certainly deserve the at- 
tention and praise. You should be 
proud of your accomplishments; * 
those closest to you.are. A loved 
one needs a shoulder to cry on. Be 
there for him or her. 



H V A T T 



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B4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



February 25, 2000 



SPECIAL EVENTS 

Celebrate a S-PIG-tacular 
holiday at Brookfield Zoo 

Pig lover of all ages can go hob wild at Brookfield Zoo's annual 
National Pig Day celebration March 1. This swine-derfiil 
event will feature activities from 10:30 a.m. - 3 p.m. in recog- 
nition of the pig, one of die smartest farmyard animals. 

Root for Brookfield Zoo's resident porcine pals, Squiggy and Tan- 
go Yucatan miniature pigs, as they take center stage in the Children's 
Zoo at 10:30 a.m. During their presentations, the two piggies will 
demonstrate some of their natural behaviors, including distinguish- 
ing scents and even colors from one another and rooting by using 
their snots to play soccer and basketball. Afterwards, join keepers in 
a rousing rendition of "Happy Pig Day to You" while the guest of 
honor each receive a special treat of carrot bouquets. 

Hoof on over to Discovery Center near the zoo's north entrance 
and wallow in fun in the Pig Pen. Children of all ages can create their 
own National Pig Day cards, 
bookmarks, fingerpring 
pig art, and paper hand 
puppets. Be sure to 
also pick up your 
copy of a recipe for 
pig biscuits to try at 
home. In addition, 
pig enthusiasts of all 
ages can play a game of "Pin 
the Tail on the Pig" (a pig 
cutout, of course). Remember 
your s-pig-tacular visit to 
Brookfield Zoo and bring your 
camera for a photo opportunity with the pig costumed character. 

In the Discovery Center main theater, enjoy the fine pork-forma- 
ce of "Pigopolis." This 12-minute animated video is about a city of 
pigs who learn to become conservation conscious. "Pigopolis" will 
run continuously from 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

You'll squeal with delight at lire array of pig-related merchandise 
available for purchase in the Discovery Center lobby. Items include 
battery operated plush pigs, plastic pig figurines, pig masks, pig cos- 
tume jewelry, pig mini beanbags, and pig key chains. 

For further information about National Pig Day at Brook- 
field Zoo, call 708/485-0263, ext. 879. 




4th Annual 



Business Expo 
Trade Show 

Antioch Community High School 

March 25 & 26 

Exhibitor Registration 
Space Is Limited 

Sell your product! 

Demonstrate your 

product! 

Free Trip to 

Las Vegas 
given away each day! 



For more information, 
please call the 

Antioch Chamber of Commerce 
at (847) 395-2233. 

Register Today! 

Sponsored by Antioch Chamber 
Co-sponsored by Lakeland Newspapers 



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Newspapers 
"Your leader In Community News' 



ART 



Children's art classes 
offered by Anderson 
Arts Center 

A'Tabric Drawing" Class for chil- 
dren will be offered by the Anderson 
Arts Center's Kid's Space - 124 66th 
Street, Kenosha, WI on Saturday, March 
11 th, from Noon - 1 :30 p.m. 

An informational flyer, listing all 
classes, their descriptions, class fees, 
registration deadlines and other general 
information is available by calling the 
Anderson Arts Center at 262/653-0481 . 



SINGLES 



Solo Singles Group 
at Gale Street Inn 

Solo Singles Group (40+) meets 
every Friday evening at 8 p.m. at the 
Gale Street Inn on Diamond Lake Hd. in 
Mundelein for dancing and socializing. 
For more information please call the hot 
line at 746-6818. 



WANTED 



Bill Porters Orchesra 
searches for talent 

Bill Porter is looking for vocalists 
with a background in swing, jazz and 
popular standards to work with his 
band. 

For more information, please send 
photo, resume and tape to: Bill Porter 
P.O. Box 1032, Morton Grove, IL 60053. 

Original Scripts sought 

Bowen Park Theatre is currently 
seeking original scripts for it's theatre for 
Young Audiences series. 

Scripts should be non-musical, 
original scripts targeted for young audi- 
ences (K-4) using an adult cast no larger 
than 6. Running time of script should at 
50-words-per-minute. 

Send all material to Bowen Park 
Theatre, Jack Benny Center for the Arts, 
TYA Script Search, 39 Jack Benny Dr., 
Waukegan 60087. Please include a self- 
addressed stamped envelope if you 
would like the material back. 

For more information, please con- 
tact Rick Covalinski, Performance Su- 
pervisor at 360-474 1 . 

The Directors Showcase 

Village Theatre of Palatine is 
pleased to announce the 2000-2001 sea- 
son will feature "The Directors Show- 
case". Directors are asked to submit a 
resume, concept and script for a play . 
they would like to direct. Concepts must 
be received by Village Theatre by April 
1 st for consideration. These will be re- 
viewed by the Village Theatre Board of 
Directors, The season and directors will 
be chosen from the concepts submitted. 

Please mail submissions to: Sally 
Moomey, C/O Village Theatre, P.O. Box 
2025, Palatine, 60078. Questions regard- 
ing the Director Showcase can be an- 
swered by calling Pat Flynn at 38 1 -8443. 



CLASSES 



Smocking Class at GCC 

Monica Larson will teach a class in 
the art of smocking at Gorton Commu- 
nity Center, 400 East Illinois Road, Lake 
Forest. 

"Introduction to Smocking" will be 
held on Tuesday, February 29 from 9:30 
a.m. - 1 2:30 p.m. The fee is $30. Stu- 
dents will learn to "make waves" — as 
well as cables and trellises, and embell- 



ishments such as rosettes and bullions. 
Pleated fabric, floss, and a needle will be 
provided; bring embroidery scissors.' 

Interested participants should reg- 
ister and pay in advance. For futher in- 
formation, or to receive a program 
brochure, contact or stop by the Gorton 
office at 234-6060 between 9 a.m. and 
4:30 p.m., weekdays. 

Seminar on Investing 

Roch Tranel, CFP, of the Tranel Fi- 
nancial Group dirough Money Concepts 
Financial Planning Centre in Libertyville 
is presenting a seminar on "Investing 
For All Economic Climates." This semi- 
nar will be held at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, 
Feb. 29, at Bellini's Italian Restaurant in 
Libertyville. 

At this educational seminar, atten- 
dees will gain valuable information on 
allocating assets to promote growth and 
limit market risk. 

The seminar is free of charge and 
there will be absolutely no selling. For 
more information or to reserve a seat, 
please call The Tranel Financial Group 
at 680-9050. 

Bridge class at G.C.C. 

Long-time bridge instructor, Gin- 
ny Schuett, will teach "Conventions 
II" on Monday at Gorton Community 
Center, 400 East Illinois Road, Lake 
Forest. 

The class will be held on February 
28 from 1 -3 p.m. The fee is $40, with a 
minimum of 12 students. This mini- 
course will include 1 No Trump Forc- 
ing, New Minor Forcing, and Fourth 
Suit Forcing. All of these bids will help 
players arrive at the correct contract 
without having to guess. Individual 
handouts will be given at each lesson. 

Interested participants should 
register and pay in advance. For 
futher information, or to receive a 
program brochure, contact or stop by 
the Gorton office at 234-6060 between 
9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., weekdays. 

FAmYFUN 

Harlem Globetrotters 
at Rosemont Horizon 

Tickets arc now on sale for the 
Chicago area's only 
appearance of the 
Harlem Globetrot- 
ters' 2000 North 
American Tour, 
"Positively Magi- 
cal." The most pop- 
ular and recognized 
basketball team in 
die world, the 
Harlem Globetrot- 
ters are suiting up 
for all-star perfor- 
mances at the Allstate Arena (formerly 
Rosemont Horizon), Fri.-Sat., Feb. 25- 
26. 

Tip-off is set for 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat. 
Tickets can be purchased at the Allstate 
Area, 6920 North Mannheim Road, 
Rosemont, and all Ticketmaster loca- 
tions. To order tickets by phone, call 
Ticketmaster at 3 12/ 559-1212. For 
group discounts, call 67 1 -9800. For gen- 
eral show information, call die Allstate 
Arena at 635-6601 or visit the official 
web site of die Harlem Globetrotters at 
www.harlemglobetrotters.com. 

Family fun for 
the price of one 

Chase away winter doldrums in a 
workshop designed with the family in 
mind at die Suburban Fine Arts Center, 
1913 Sheridan Road in downtown High- 
land Park. 

Make a Polymer Clay Box on Sun- 




day, Feb. 27th with your child aged 7-9 
for only $15 and an afternoon of fun. Or 
try your hands in ceramic clay in Family 
Fun on die Potters Wheel on Saturday, 
March 4th (only $20 for hours of enter- 
tainment and education). 

Maybe Papier Mache Creatures will 
entice you for an afternoon for ages 5 
and up on Sunday, March 12th. 

And what could be more fun than 
making a kite in March? Sign up for Kite 
Kreations, Sat., March 18. Remember, 
parent and child come for the price of 
one. 

The Suburban Fine Arts Center is a 
not for profit art school and gallery lo- 
cated in downtown Highland Park. 
Gallery hours are 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Mon- 
day through Saturday. For more infor- 
mation call 432-1888. 



REUNION 



Class Reunion for 
Foreman High School 

Foreman High School will be hav- 
ing a fiftieth class reunion on September 
10th, A search for uninformed class- 
mates continues and any information of 
the whereabouts of die graduates could 
be updated for a mailing list. 

Any information can be forward to 
Mrs. George Cleary (Joan Fritz) 21-37 
Marina court, Lake Carroll, 61046-2982, 
phone 566-5954, or web address 
http://members.xoom.com/- 
XOOM/Forcmanhigh/index.html. 



DANCE 



In Like A Lion dance 

Buoys and Belles Square Dance 
Club in Waukegan, is hosting "In Like A 
Lion Dance" with caller Jody Serllck on 
Friday, March 3. Times are Plus work- 
shop at 8-8:30 p.m.; Main Stream 8:30- 
10:30; Plus tip at 10:30 and die cost is 
$3.50 per person to be held at die First 
United Methodist Church, 1 28 N. Utica 
Street, Waukegan. 

Use west parking lot rear door, 
downstairs to Fellowship Hall. All mod- 
ern western square dancers in the area 
are invited. Light refreshments will be 
served. For lessons call 746-1461 or Jody 
Serlick at 362-0130 or log-on to web site 
HTTP://MEMBERS.USS.NEr / JSER- 
LICK. 

Fermilab Arts Series 
Presents Dance Festival 

Just in time for Saint Patrick's Day, 
die Fermilab Arts Series presents an 
evening of traditional Irish music and 
World Champion step dancing with 
some of die top traditional Irish perform- 
ers in die country when Mick Moloney's 
Irish Music and Dance Fcsdval makes it's 
way to Fermilab's Famsey Auditorium on 
Saturday, March 1 1 at 8 p.m. 

Tickets for die Mick Moloney's Irish 
Music & Dance Festival are just $18. For 
further information or telephone reser- 
vations, call 630/040-ARTS weekday 
from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. At other times an an- 
swering machine will give you informa- 
tion and a means of placing ticket or- 
ders. For more information check out 
our web site at vvww.fnal.gov/culturc. 

Auditions at TJ & Co. 
Dance Theatre 

TG & Company Dance Theatre an- 
nounces open auditions for their Ir, 
Company and Apprentice dancers. Au- 
ditions will be held on Sunday, March 5 
at 1 p.m. for dancers 13 and older, 3 p.m. 
for dancers 1 2 and younger , at the Lake 
Forest Dance Academy, 400 Hastings 
Rd,, Lake Forest. 

Continued on next page 



Chicagoland Power Boat Show, March 17 



The Pre-owned Boat Pavil- 
ion and Nautical Flea Mar- 
ket are two exciting fea- 
tures boat lovers can an- 
ticipate when the 2000 Chicagoland 
All-Power Boat Show jumpstarts 
the boating season March 17-19 at 
Rosemont Convention Center. 

The Chicagoland Boat Show 
will showcase more than 500 new 
ski boats, Fishing boats, cruisers, 
personal watercraft, jet boats and 
high performance boats as well as a 
wide variety of accessories and ser- 
vices all reduced for great savings 
during the three-day show. Sizes 
range from 10 feet to 35 feet. 

Chicago's first ever Pre-owned 
Boat Pavilion is a show within a 
show, featuring over 50 late models 
up to 26 feet. Claims show manager 
Norm Schultz, it is the largest pre- 
owned section ever assembled at a 




- Chicagoland " 

BoatShow 



major U.S. indoor boat show. 

Making its Chicago debut this 
year, The Nautical Flea Market will 
give show visitors a chance to pick 
up some great deals on marine ac- 
cessories. "You name it — we've 
got it," Schultz exclaimed. "Boaters 
will find new and used parts and 
supplies— all at super flea market 
prices." 



Show goers won't want to miss 
the exclusive James Bond Display 
featuring the "Q" boat from the lat- 
est 007 adventure film "The World 
is Not Enough. The "Neptune Sub- 
marine" from the 1981 film "For 
Your Eyes Only" and the Wet-Bike, 
the first aquatic motorbike, which 
debuted in the 1977 Bond movie 
"The Spy Who Loved Me, will also 
be part of the exhibit. 

"This early spring show is a 
great opportunity to preview the 
hottest new products for the 2000 
boating season at reduced prices 
and also reel in some great deals on 
pre-owned boats," says Schultz. 

Show hours are Friday, March 
17th, Noon -9:30 p.m.; Saturday, 
March 18th, 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m.; and 
Sunday, March 19th, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. 
Admission is $6.50 for adults and $2 
for children 12 & under. 



: 



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■ 



February 25, 2000 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B5 



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Continued from preceding page 

Rehearsals will begin o n April 2 
with performances opportunities 
throughout the summer. Major perfor- 
mance opportunities include "Dance 
Explosion 2000" in August and "The 
Cracked Nut" in December. Dancers 
will be performing with professional 
dancers and choreographers. For more 
information, please call Terri Gamer at 
491-3147. 

TG & Company Dance Theatre is a 
non -for-profit 501 (c)(3) corporation in 
the state of Illinois. 



THEATRE 




Voices 2000' at PM&L 

A very interesting and challenging 
Reader's Theatre presentation VOICES 
2000 by Peter Dee will be 
given at the PM&LThe- 
atre,877MainSt.,Anti- 
och, on Sunday, Feb. 27 
at 230 p.m. directed by 
Barbara Conkrite from 
Fox Lake. The perfor- 
mance is free. No reserva- 
tions are necessary. 

VOICES 2000 will be performed by 
4 talented teens since the subject matter 
is teen issues as they are entering the 
21st Century. It will be of special interest 
to teens, parents and grandparents. The 
language is spirited and sometimes 
strong as the teens perform a series of 
skits dealing with various subjects of 
drug abuse, teen pregnancy, and other 
contemporary teen problems. The ac- 
tors are Jessica Smouse, Bridget Heffer- 
nan, Joie Guffrey, and Mike Anderson 
from Antioch. 

For any further information call 
587-7204. 

The Good Doctor 
at Village Theatre 

Village Theatre of Palatine Inc. is 
pleased to announce the second pro- 
duction of its 50th season, "The Good 
Doctor" directed by Larry Boiler and 
produced by Jim and Kate Williams. . 

All performances are at Cutting 
Hall, 150 E. Wood St., Palatine. Perfor- 
mance dates are February 25-26, March 
3-5, 10-12. Friday and Saturday perfor- 
mances areat 8 p.m. Sunday perfor- 
mances are matinees at 2:30 p.m. Re- 
served seating is available by calling the 
Village Theatre boxoffice at358-2506; 
Tickets are $12.. 

"The Good Doctor" was written by 
Neil Simon and Is composed of several 
one acts all tied together by the narra- 
tion of the "writer." 



MUSIC 



Waukegan Concert 
Chorus season 

After the celebrated Messiah con- 



cert, the Waukegan Concert Corns re- 
turns to bring audiences another spec- 
tacular concert. Under the direction of 
Thomas Tobln, the Chorus will perform 
favorites such as Brahms' Nanie, Brit- 
ten's Jubilate Deo and Mathias' Let the 
People Sing. This dynamic group will 
perform on Sun., March 5 at 4 p.m. in 
the Orlin D. Trapp Auditorium , 
Waukegan High School. 

The Orlin D. Trapp Auditorium is 
located in the Waukegan High School, 
2325 Brookside Ave.. Tickets are $12 for 
adults and $10 for students, seniors and 
military. Children under 12 are free 
when accompanied by an adult Group 
discounts are available. Tickets can be 
purchased by calling 360-4740, at the 
door or on the Web at 
www.ticketweb.com. 

Waukegan Symphony 
Orchestra Concert 

The Waukegan Symphony Orches- 
tra is starting off 2000 with a concert to 
be performed on Feb. 27 in the Orlin D. 
Trapp Auditorium, Waukegan High 
School at 4 p.m. The program features 
Rossini's Overture to the Barber of 
Seville, Hummel's Trumpet Concerto in 
E-Flat wi th guest trumpeter David 
Gauger and Mendelssohn's Symphony 
No. 3 in a minor, the "Scotch". This 
promises to be an exceptional perfor- 
mance. 

Fresh faces and the same, quality 
sound ensures that the Y2 K for the 
Waukegan Symphony Orchestra will be 
outstanding. Guest directed by Stephen 
Blackweldcr, the WSO will present their 
concert on Feb. 27 in the Orlin D. Trapp 
Auditorium, Waukegan High School at 4 
p.m. Tickets are $12 for adults and $10 
for seniors, students and military. Chil- 
dren under 12 are free when accompa- 
nied by an adult Call 360-4742 at the 
Jack Benny Carter for the Arts for tickets 
or information. 

Benefit for 
Margaret Ann's Place 

' April 16 spend the day with the 
Chenille Sisters. Back by popular de- 
mand, the Chenille's will be performing 
a two-concert series to benefit Margare- 
tAnn's Place, a center for grieving chil- 
dren, teens and families. 

Tickets for the 1 p.m. children's 
concert are $10. The adult concert is 
scheduled for 7 p.m. Tickets for this 
concert are $15. All tickets are for gener- 
al seating. The concerts will be per- 
formed atTremper High School, 
Kenosha, WI. 

For further information please call 
262-656-9656, 



FESTIVAL 



Summer Arts and 
Crafts Festival 

Artists and craftpepple who want to 



sell their work at the University of Wis- 
consin Parkside's Summer Arts and 
Crafts Festival should contact the Uni- 
versity immediately. Applications for . 
booth space are now available on a first- 
come, first-served basis for the June 
24 th event. 

Although the majority of exhibitors 
will be from Wisconsin and Illinois, Fes- 
tival organizers say the program attracts 
artists from Minnesota, Indiana, Iowa, 
and as far away as Arizona. Past Festi- 
vals have featured ceramic pottery, 
stained glass, woodworking, paintings, 
jewelry, photography, quilting, weaving, 
many other craft and fine art objects. 

The UW-Parkside Summer Arts and 
Crafts Festival is held, rain or shine, 
from 10 a,m. - 4 p.m. Booth space is 
limited and a sizable number of applica- 
tions have already been received. All 
proceeds from the Festival help the Uni- 
versity of Wiscpnsin-Parkside's Music 
Scholarship Fund. 

For an application, call 262-595- 
2457. 

WORKSHOP 

Publishing your 
short fiction 

The Ragdale Foundation in Lake 
Forest offers aWriting Workshop: Pub- 
lishing your Short Fiction on Monday, 
March 6 - Monday, April 24, at 7 - 9 p.m. 
and is $200 per person. Limited to 14 
people. To register call 234-1063 or send 
your check for $200 to the Regdale 
Foundation, 1260 North Green Bay 
Road, Lake Forest, IL 60045, marked 
Short Fiction Workshop. 

This workshop will focus on getting 
your short stories published. You'll 
learn how to research literary markets 
for your work and how to find an agent 
when you are ready. There will be week- 
ly exercises in class to help you with 
your craft. 

KIDS STUFF = 

Children's Discovery 
Days 

Discover thehlstoryoftoys 
throughout the 20 th Century during the 
program Knick-Knacks and Hacky Sacks 
at the Wheaton History Center's Chil- 
dren's Discovery Days on Saturday, . 
March 4, from 10-11:30 a.m. This pro- 
gram for children ages 5 and up, will in- 
volve unearthing the tricks of turning 
knick-knacks into entertainment 

The Wheaton History Center is lo- 
cated at 606 N. Main St at Lincoln Av- 
enue, and is open Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday, and Saturday from 10 a.m. - 
4 p.m., and Sunday from 1-4 p.m. Mu- 
seum admission is $1 for students and 
seniors, $2 for adults, and $5 for fami- 
lies. For more information, please call 
Laura Dooley, Educator at 630/682- 
9472. 



4 



Chicago' at Rosemont Theatre 




Broadways hit revival sizzles in Rosemont 

Tickets are on sale now for the razzle-dazzle and all that jazz 
of the Broadway phenomenon, Chicago, coming to the 
Rosemount Theatre, March 14 - 19. Heating up the stage 
will be Alan Thicke as "Billy Flynn" and Vicki Lewis, of the 
television series NewsRadio, as "Velma Kelly" along with the sexy 
sophistication of Ann Reinking's Bob Fosse-like choreography. 
"A story of murder, greed, corruption, violence, exploitation, 
adultery, and treachery," Chicago began as a 1926 play, by 
Chicago Tribune criminal courts reporter Maurine Dallas 
Watkins, that shocked audiences with its taboo story of Rox- 
ie Hart, a nightclub dancer who kills her lover and hires 
Chicago's shrewdest layer to clear her name while making 
her a media darling. Today, in a revival of Bob Fosse's 
steamy 1975 musical, it seems ripped from contempo- 
rary headlines, evoking comparisions to recent celebrity 
trials and America's fascination with them. 

Chicago, starring Alan Thicke and Vicki Lewis, will 
appear at the Rosemont Theatre at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, 
March 14; Wednesday, March 15; and Thursday, 
March 16; 8 p.m., Friday, March 17; 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., 
Saturday, March 18; and 1 p.m. and 7 p.m., Sunday, 
March 19. 
Tickets are priced from $29.50 - $59.50, with $5 off on 
weeknights, and are available at the Rosemont Theatre Box Office, 
5600 N. River Road in Rosemont, at all Ticketmaster outlet, or by 
calling 312-559-1212. 

The Chicago website at www.chicagothemusical.com features triv- 
ia, history, cast recording excerpts and a link to Ticketmaster. 



Vicki Lewis, best known as "Beth" on TV's News Radio, 
stars as "Velma Kelly" in the six time Tony-award win- 
ning production of "Chicago." 




Barnum's Kaleidoscape to 
pitch its tent in Chicago 

Tickets are 
now on 
sale for 
Ringling 
Bros, and Bamum 
& Bailey's tri- 
umphant return to 
the big top — Bar- 
num's Kalei- 
doscape. This all- 
new entertainment 
experience — three 
hours of up-close, 
intimate and un- 
abashed fun — will 
make its Chicago 
debut March 29 
through April 30, 
adjacent to Soldier 
Field. 

Barnum's 
Kaleidoscape, fea- 
turing Clown of Clowns David Larible, 1999 winner of the Interna- 
tional Circus Festival of Monte Carlo Golden 
Clown Award, unfolds in a carpeted complex of 
three tents with 1,850 plush crimson velvet 
"ringside seats," including exclusive sofa 
seating for the ultimate viewing experience. 
With every seat within 50 feet of the circus 
ring, the show's "up close and personal" at- 
mosphere will have audience members actively 
engaged with the performers from the moment they enter the red- 
and-white reception tent. 

Chicago performances of Barnum's Kaleidoscape are scheduled 
for 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday and 7 p.m. on Sunday, with 2 p.m. 
matinees on Saturday and Sunday, except on Easter Sunday, April 23, 
when the matinee will be at 3 p.m. The special pre-show reception 
with the performers begins one hour prior to each performance. 
Tickets, priced at $47, $27.75 and $17.75, are available at all Ticket- 
master locations. Reduced-price tickets are available for a March 28 
preview performance. 

For additional information or to purchase tickets by phone call 
559-1212 or toll free 1-877-9BARNUM. To learn more about Bar- 
mun's Kaleidoscape, log on to www.bamumkaleidoscape.com. 



Clown David Larible is joined by European 
Harlequin Pipo in the first Ringling Bros, 
and Bamum & Bailey production to be pre- 
sented under a tent in the U.S. since 
1956. 





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February. 25, 2000 



February 25, 2000 



HOT SPOTS 



ADVERTISEMENT 



SPOTLIGHT: 





Location: 

Across from the Lake County Fairgrounds, in the Schoolhouse 

Plaza, at 1 1 1 S. Highway 45, in Grayslake. 

Telephone: 
(847) 548-8882 

Hours: 

Seven days a week; Monday through Thursday from 1 1 :30 a.m. to 9 
p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 1 1:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday 
from 2:30 to 9 p.m. 

Menu: 

Wide variety of Chinese cuisine including the most popular 

Cantonese, Mandarin, Szechwan and Hunan dishes. 



Tang's offers freshness, 
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In the four years that Tang's Restaurant has been 
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been to serve the best Chinese food in the area in a 
casual Oriental setting, focusing on quality, fresh- 
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without compromises. 

Tang's Restaurant is easily accessible, located at 
111 S. Highway 45, in the Schoolhouse Plaza, 
across from the Lake County Fairgrounds, in 
Grayslake. There's plenty of free parking in front of 
the restaurant. 

Tang's is known for serving the widest variety of 
Chinese food, including the most popular 
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es, at the most reasonable prices. 

Tang's chefs brings its customers almost 45 years 
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while fast and efficient service, by the knowledge- 
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Tang's large dining room is available for private 
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early for the special event so that you and your party 
can experience the adventure of dining on Tang's 
delicious Chinese cuisine together. Dine-in, carry 
out and delivery available. 

Tang's is open seven days a week, Monday 
through Thursday, 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday and 
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from 2:30 to 9 p.m. 

At Tang's, "Our customers are our critics. Visit us 
once and we guarantee you will be- back for more/' 
Call (847) 548-8882 for more information. 



Lakeland Newspapers I W7 



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FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



February 25, 2000 



Go 'The Whole Nine Yards' for big laughs 






Bruce Willis, fresh off his 
Academy Award-nominat- 
ed $280 million block- 
buster The Sixth Sense, 
plays former Chicago mob hitman 
turned snitch Jimmy "The Tulip" 
Tudeski in Tfw Wliole Nine Yards. 
The movie begins with Willis mov- 
ing to Montreal, next door to den- 
tist Nicholas "Oz" Oseransky 
(Matthew Perry). 

Tudeski, hiding out in Cana- 
da from the Hungarian mob he 
raited out back in Chicago and the 
lofty price the mob put on his 
head, is immediately recognized 
by Oz and that, as they say, is 
where the plot thickens. 

Oz, in all his nervous, Barney 
Fife-ish charm conveys Tudeski's 
identity to his French-Canadian 
wife Sophie {Rosanna Arquette) 
who says she will grant Oz a di- 
vorce if he rats out Tudeski and 
collects a "finder's fee" to pay off 
her father's debts. 

What Oz doesn't know is that 
Sophie not only tells Tudeski what 
Oz is doing but has hired numer- 
ous hitmen to kill him because 
he's worth more dead than alive. 

Upon Oz's arrival in Chicago, 



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movie review 




The Whole Nine Yards 

Rating 

R 
Director 

Jonathan Lynn 
Starring 

Bruce Willis 

Amanda Peet 

Matthew Perry 

Natasha Henstridge 

Michael Clarke Duncan 

Kevin Pollack 

Rosanna Arquette 



. 



he is "greeted" by another hitman 
Frankie Figs, played well by Chica- 
go native Michael Clarke Duncan, 
who shows his comedic skills after 
his Academy Award-nominated 
performance as oft-silent savior 
John Coffey in 77ie Green Mile. 

Figs proceeds to beat 
Tudeski's location out of Oz and 
brings him to his boss Yanni 
Gogolack (Kevin Pollak), son of 
the aforementioned incarcerated 
Hungarian mob boss who plays 
out a useless stereotypical comic 
relief with a funny accent. 

When Oz is brought to Gogo- 
lack's, he lays eyes on Tudeski's 
estranged wife Cynthia (Natasha 
Henstridge of Species fame) and 
experiences love at first sight. 



Somewhat unbelievable is the 
fact that she instantly comes on to 
him proclaiming that she hasn't 
had sex in five years to which Oz 
responds, "Neither have L.I've 
been married." 

Oz then swears to protect her 
after he hears of Tudeski's desire 
to kill her for a $10 million inheri- 
tance. 

The movie then revolves 
around numerous plot twists, 
double and triple-crosses and Per- 
ry's usual Chandler Ring (TVs 
Friends) sarcasm as Oz, which he 
lays on pretty thick. 

I'll be the first to admit that 
the whole "nerd meets mobster" 
genre has been done to death e.g. 
Analyze TJiis, Mickey Blue Eyes, 
but this movie actually made me 
laugh throughout its entirety. 




Matthew Perry, Bruce Willis and Amanda Peet in Warner 
Brothers' The Whole Nine Yards. 



With the exception of Hen- 
stridge's somber Cynthia and Pol- 
lak's stereotypical Yanni Gogo- 
lack, this movie has some hilari- 
ous characters. 

The banter between Tudeski 
and Oz is hilarious as is the physi- 
cal humor from Oz and the hulk- 
ing Frankie Figs. 

I also liked Arquette's depic- 
tion of Sophie as a cold, vicious, 
life-sucking beast from hell. 

One hilarious character I 
haven't even mentioned yet is 
Oz's dental assistant and aspiring 
hitwoman Jill (Amanda Peet from 
TVs Jack and Jilt} who was actual- 
ly hired by Oz's wife to kill him but 
eventually grows to like him. 



Jill then hooks up with Tudes- 
ki and Figs, joins their "team" and 
begins to learn how to be a hit- 
woman. 

I usually don't see very many 
comedies, but I haven't laughed at 
one this much in a long time. 

Some people might say that 
Perry is just reprising his Chandler 
Bing role and while that may be 
true, I happen to find that charac- 
ter hilarious. 

Since most of the movies out 
there right now are dramas, Tlie 
Wliole Nine Yards is a welcome 
change. 

I gave Jonathan Lynn's 77ie 
Wliole Nine Yards four out of five 
popcorn boxes. 



CRITIC'S CHOICE 



Shakespeare Chicago rises to Mdsummer Night's Dreairi 



Forget the wintry wind and 
snowy drifts. At Navy Pier the sea- 
son is turned topsy-turvy with the 
arrival of Chicago Shakespeare The- 
atre's first-ever production of the 
bard's "A Midsummer Night's 
Dream." 

And what a hot, lush produc- 
tion it is. Under the direction of Joe 
Dovvling (credits include the Abbey 
Theatre in Ireland), the romantic 
comedy was never more witty nor 
more sensual they got it right. 

For young lover — and an ama- 
teur theater group - the forest turns 
out to be an enchanted place. 

While Dowling's inclusion of 



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THRU THURSDAY, MAR. 2 

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Fri 5:00 7:45 10:15 

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WHERC MOVIE GOING IS FUN AND AFFdflDALUE 



rock, bee-bop and blues during the 
interludes is bound to offend some 
purists, so be it. Shakespeare's fan- 
tasy is for the ages, and contempo- 
rary adaptations only make the dra- 
ma that much more accessible. 

Brace yourself, however, for 
more than a few interspersed musi- 
cal selections. Highflying Puck, the 
mischief-making fairy, sports body 
piercings and tattoos. Sassy Dany- 
on Davis, in the role, definitely 
makes a statement. 

Thrown off-course by the pow- 
er of a magic potion, two sets of 
lovers engage in some spirited rival- 
ry before their relationships are 
sorted out. When we first meet 
Lysander (Darrell Stokes) and 
Demetrius (Robert Kahn) they are 
in military attire and Hermia (Eliza- 
beth Ledo) and Helena are in for- 
mal modern dress. But during their 
adventure in the woods, they ap- 
pear in skivvies - yet their frolic is as 



EGAL 



that of young innocents. 
McKinley Carter is espe- 
cially witty and charm- 
ing as the Helena, the 
odd woman out in the 
foursome. 

The fairy king 
Oberon, played by Tim- 
othy Gregory, has sport 
with his queen Titania 
(Ellen Karas), who is 
blinded by magic po- 
tion and falls in love 
with jackass (Richard 
Iglewski, as the riotous 
Bottom, who is trans- 
formed into a beast). 

The other mechani- 
cals, a rag-tag band of 
amateur actors, also get 
their share of belly-laughs as they 
fuss with rehearsals of their hapless 
but thoroughly amusing play-with- 
in-a-play. 

This is Chicago Shakespeare's 




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February 25, 2000 



SPRING HOME & GARDEN 



Lakeland Newspapers /B9 




Discovering the joy of trees as Arbor Day nears 



TVees come in all shapes and sizes-so 
many that it can be almost impossible to tell 
them apart. How do you know if you're ad- 
miring a red maple or an amur maple, a Col- 
orado blue or an Engelmann spruce? 

"Helping people enjoy and appreciate 
trees is very important," says The National Ar- 
bor Day Foundation President John Rosenow. 
"Being able to identify trees is important to 
knowing how to care for them and how to 
plant the right tree in the right place." 

The Foundation was founded in 1972 as a 
nonprofit education organization dedicated 
to tree planting and environmental steward- 
ship. The Foundation is committed to ad- 
vancing tree planting through the celebration 
of Arbor Day. National Arbor Day is the last ' 
Friday in April, falling this year on April 28, al- 
though some states celebrate the tree planti- 
ng holiday on dates best suited to their own 
climate. 

As we prepare to celebrate the first Arbor 
Day of the new millennium, The National Ar- 
bor Day Foundation suggests these simple 
guidelines for planting your trees; 
Planting a Containerized Dree 

If a tree is planted correctly, it will grow 
twice as fast and live at least twice as long as 
one that is planted incorrectly. Ideally, dig or 
rototill an area one foot deep and approxi- 
mately five times the diameter of the root ball. 
The prepared soil will encourage root growth 



beyond the root ball and results in a healthier 
tree. 

In transplanting, be sure to keep soil 
around the roots. Always handle your tree by 
the ball, not by the trunk or branches. Don't 
let the root ball dry out. Help prevent root 
girdling by vertically cutting any roots that 
show tendencies to circle the foot ball. After 
placing the tree, pack soil firmly but not tight- 
ly around the root ball. Water the soil and 
place a protective 3-foot circle of mulch 
around the tree. 
Planting a Bare-rootTree 

It is best to plant bare-root trees immedi- 
ately, in order to keep the fragile roots from 
drying out. If you can't plant because of 
weather or soil conditions, store the trees in a 
cool place and keep the roots moist 

Unpack tree and soak In water 6-12 hours. 
Do not plant with packing materials attached 
to roots, and do not allow roots to dry out. Dig 
a hole, wider than seems necessary, so the 
roots can spread without crowding. Remove 
any grass within a 3-foot circular area. To aid 
root growth, turn soil in an area up to three 
feet in diameter. 

Plant the tree at the same depth it stood 
in the nursery, without crowding the roots. 
Partially 011 the hole, firming the soil around 
the lower roots. Do not add extra soil ameni- 
ties. 

Shovel in the remaining soil. It should be 



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(262) 843-1864 
(262) 843-2317 




Planting trees can mean a better tomorrow — for trees and people. 



firmly, but not tightly, packed with your heel. 
Construct a water-holding basin around the 
tree. Give the tree plenty of water. After the 
wafer has soaked in, place a 2- inch deep pro- 
tective mulch area three feet in diameter 
around the base of the tree (but not touching 
the trunk). Water the tree generously every 
week or 10 days during the first year. 
The Value of Mulch 

Mulcji is a tree's best friend. It insulates 
soil, retains moisture, keeps out weeds, pre- 
vents soil compaction, reduces lawnmower 
damage, and adds an aesthetic touch to a 
yard or street Remove any grass within the. 
mulch area, an area from 3-10 feet in diame- 
ter, depending on tree size. Pour wood chips 
or bark pieces 2-4 inches within the circle, but 
not touching the trunk. 

To help in choosing the trees that are right 
for your region, The National Arbor Day 
Foundation has put together "What Tree Is 
That," a popular tree identification guide that 
is fun and easy to use. This handy booklet 
comes in two .editions, one for trees com- 
monly found in the Eastern and Central Unit- 
ed States, and the other for Western states, or 
those from the Rocky Mountains to the West 
Coast. Each is available for $3.00 post-paid. 
These comprehensive, pocket-size guides 
help you identify trees based on their leaves, 
flowers, fruit, and twig characteristics, among 



other things. Information is cross-referenced 
and clearly illustrated to make it even handi- 
er, and the booklet also contains information 
on hardiness zones across the United States 
and a glossary of common tree terms. Tree- 
loving travelers often buy both Eastern and 
Western editions. 

These are also great for parents driving 
across country with school age children. Have 
the kids identify and report on all of the new 
trees they see. It's a fun and educational way to 
make traveling more enjoyable. Reward them 
for the most new trees identified, the most un- 
usual, etc. You'll keep peace in the back seat 
and maybe learn something yourself. 

To order, send your check or money order 
to The National Arbor Day Foundation, 100 
Arbor Avenue, Nebraska City, NE 68410, and 
be sure to specify which edition you're re- 
questing. You can also join the Foundation 
and receive 10 free trees as part of your mem- 
bership benefits by sending a $10 contribu- 
tion to Ten Free Trees, c/oThe National Arbor 
Day Foundation, 100 Arbor Avenue, Nebraska 
City, NE 68410. These little trees, each 6-12 
inches long, are selected for your region and 
are guaranteed to grow, or they'll be replaced 
free of charge. 

You can learn more about The National 
Arbor Day Foundation by visiting its Web site, 
www.arborday.org. 



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B 1 /Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKEL1FE 



February 25, 2000 



1 



J 




Computer Country Expo 

Saturday, February 26 

First 1,000 people to enter the expo receive Creating GeoCities Websites, by 
Ben Sawyer and Dave Greely. 

Save up to 70% on "Everything Computer." Eighty vendors from across the 
Midwest with computer clubs, live midi-enhanced entertainment, wild ani- 
mals, workshops, demos, hourly raffle. Come network! 
Free magazines! 

* 

9:30 am to 3 p.m. in the Lake County Fairgrounds Exhibit 
Hall. Route 120 (Belvidere Rd.) and Route 45, Grayslake, 
Illinois. FREE Parking! Admission $6. 



COUPONS 



You Save 

$1.00 

On Admission 




Your Family/Friend 

Saves 
$1.00 On Admission 




February 25, 2000 




CLUES ACROSS 

I. Intense fire 

4. Type of memory 
6. Primary color 

8. Test 

9. Country in North 
America, abbr. . 

II. Wanderer 



CLUES DOWN 

2. Easter flowers 

3. Hospital ward, abbr. 
5. Capital of Canada 

7. Day before a holiday 

10. Indefinite article 

Answers: 



UMOQ 
pBUION 

'IT , VS'n , 6 urexa'8 ania-g WOH'fr azcifl-l 

ssoioy 



TIMELINE 



iiifti 



• A GLASS PYRAMID ENTRANCE TO THE LOUVRE 
MUSEUM, WHICH WAS DESIGNED BY I.M. PEI, WAS 
COMPLETED IN PARIS, FRANCE. 

• ON OCT. 13, THE DOW JONES INDEX FELL 190 
POINTS, WALL STREET'S SECOND -LARGEST ONE- 
DAY FALL TO THAT DATE. 

• IN NOVEMBER, REEBOK LAUNCHED THE REEBOK 
PUMP, THE FIRST INFLATABLE TRAINING SHOE. 



Lakeland Newspapers/S'ii 





A shelf above 
a fireplace 



FEBRUARY 



2000 



■■■■'■'. '-"'- npj '; ■ y^ ... .■ <& •■■'■' ■■:;■;■ 



T W T F S 

- - 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 - - - - 



HOW 'CAN ^YOU FIGURE OUT IF A PARTICULAR YEAR IS 'A LEAP YEAR? 



HOCUS -FOCUS 



BY 
HENRY BOLTIHOFF 



Find at least six differences between the two panels. 




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Get The 
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Answer: 




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English: 

Spanish: 

Italian: 

French: 

German: 

Latin: 



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LAKELIFE 



February 25, 2000 



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COUNTY DIGEST 



CLC College night 
March 16 

More than 150 representatives 
from four-year colleges, universities 
and the military will participate in 
the 22nd annual Lake County Area 
College Night from 6 to 8:30 p.m. 
March 16 at the College of Lake 
County's Physical Education Center, 
building 7, on the Grayslake Campus. 

College Night is an opportunity 
for high school students to discover 
the many educational choices avail- 
able at CLC and other institutions. 
Representatives will answer ques- 
tions about choosing a college and 
provide information about admis- 
sion requirements, tuition and fi- 
nancial aid. 

The evening also will include 
free workshops on financial aid and 
emerging careers at 6:30 and 7:30 
p.m. For information, call Nan- 
cy McGuire, student recruitment li- 
aison at CLC, 543-2285. 

Contraceptive 
options discussed 

Elizabeth Cesare-Utes, a regis-' 
tered nurse in the family life educa- 
tion division of the Lake County 
Health Department, will present a 
lecture on the different contracep- 
tive options available for women of 
childbearing age. The session will be 
held from 8:30 to 10 a.m. in Room 
C003 at the College of Lake County's 
Grayslake Campus. The program is 
sponsored by the CLC health center 
in cooperation with Pharmacia and 
Upjohn.The lecture is free and open 
.to the public. For information, call 
.543,-2064.: 



Porter endorses former chi 



By SANDY HARTOGH 
Staff Reporter 



Despite retiring U.S. Congress- 
man John Porter's (R-Wilmette) 
initial decision not to endorse a 
10th Congressional District Re- 
publican candidate, fears that "a 
candidate, who would be unelec- 
table in the fall, could win the pri- 
mary with a very small percentage 
of the vote" spurred him to change 



his mind. Last Friday, Porter offi- t 
daily announced his decision to 
endorse his former chief of staff, 
Mark Kirk. 

"When I announced my inten- 
tion to retire from Congress at the 
end of this term, I indicated my re- 
luctance to.endorse in the Republi- 
can primary unless I felt it was likely 
a candidate might be nominated 
who, in my judgment, could not win 
in November," stated Porter in a 




press conference held at the Liber- 
tyville Civic Center. "More than any 
other candidate, Mark Kirk is pre- 
pared for this high office, I endorse 
him enthusiastically." 

Kirk, a native of Kenilworth, grew 
up in the district and served on 
Porter's Washington staff for six 
years. However, his Washington-ori- 
ented career and endorsements 
from several! township Republican 
organizations, including Libertyville, 



have not been enough to put Kirk at 
the top of the polls. 

Kirk's opponents believe that is 
the main reason Porter changed his 
mind. 

"Kirk, Porter's hand-picked heir, 
is in trouble" said Matt Ryan, cam- 
paign manager for candidate An- 
drew Hochberg. "Every poll we've 
seen shows Andy Hochberg ahead 

Please see KIRK IC2 



Coroner may toughen 
screening of potential 
county employees 



By SANDY HARTOGH 
Staff Reporter 



According to Mark Danaj, direc- 
tor of the Lake County Human Re- 
source Department, Coroner Bar- 
bara Richardson in looking into "en- 
hanced" screening procedures, in- 
cluding fingerprinting, for potential 
employees of the county's Coroner 
Office. 

This follows recent revelations 
that former Deputy Coroner Ezekiel 
(a.k. a. Lionel) Locke falsified his per- 



sonal background on his job applica- 
tion, including his social security 
number, education, and service 
records. 

Further investigations revealed 
that Locke had outstanding criminal 
warrants in Bellwood, III. for domes- 
tic violence charges, and is wanted by 
Georgia authorities in relation to a 
felony conviction of which the details 
are unknown at this time. 

The history of Locke, who was 

Please see CORONER IC2 




Hanging it up 

Long time Grant Community High School head varsity basketball 
coach Tom Maple huddles with his team during the last home 
game of his career against Mundelein — Photo by Candace H. 
Johnson 





KNOCKS IN 
THE HEAD 

New Cubs skipper 
has dubious record 

SEE PAGE C5 



BIG GOVERNMENT 

CDW awarded monster 
computer contract 

SEE PAGE C6 



committee 
endorses candidates 



By SANDY HARTOGH 
Staff Reporter 



The Illinois Citizen Action Politi- 
cal Committee (ICAPC), an environ- 
mentally conscious organization, re- 
cently announced its endorsements 
for sue candidates pursuing nomina- 
tion for the Lake County Board. 

According to Earl Johnson, exec- 
utive director of the ICAPC, the en- 
dorsed candidates were chosen be- 
cause of their support for preserva- 
tion of the environment — the main 
mission of the group. 

Two county board incumbents, 
Suzi Schmidt (R-Lake Villa) and Bon- 
nie Thomson Carter (R-Ingleside) 
have received ICAPC endorsements. 



Schmidt is up against Richard Russell 
of Lindenhurst for the District 3 pri- 
mary. Carter's opponent in the Dis- 
trict 5 primary will be James Pappas 
oflngleside. 

The group has given its support 
to a Republican and a Democrat for 
the District 4 seat being vacated by 
Jim LaBelle (R-Zion/Benton), county 
board chairman. Ronald Molinaro 
III of Winthrop Harbor will be run- 
ning unopposed on the Democratic 
ticket, while Brent Paxton of Zion will 
contend with Glenn Stewart of Zion 
and Ronald Collangelo of Winthrop 
Harbor for the Republican ticket. 

District 13 Incumbent, John 

Please see PORTER IC2 






y 



history month in March 



The College of Lake County will 
celebrate Women's History Month in 
March with a variety of activities 
from March 2 to 23. sponsored by the 
CLC chapter of the American Associ- 
ation for Women in Community Col- 
leges, this year's celebration is dedi- 
cated in memory of Betty Robertson, 
former director of student services at 
the Lakeshore Campus and a 19-year 
CLC employee, who died in 1999. 

The following activities will be 
presented on the Grayslake Carnpus: 

March 2: Communication 
among Women in a Diverse Society, 
a workshop from noon to 1 p.m. in 
C003, will examine the similarities 
and differences in communication 
between black and white women. 

March 5: Cherish the Ladies. 



March 7: Financial Planning for 
the New Millennium— A Woman's 
Perspective. 

March 8: Gender and Film in the 
Year 2000. 

March 13: Do the Things You 
Think You Cannot Do. 

March 16: Rating Women Lead- 
ers. 

March 20: Women in the Church: 
Liberation, Oppression or Both?. 

March 22: Women in Defense of 
Their Couijtry. 

March 23: Gender Issues in the 
Middle East. 

The program is open to the gen- 
eral public. For complete informa- 
tion about CLC's Women's History 
Month activities, call Julie Shroka at 
543-2847. 



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C2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



February 25, 2000 



Carmel High School announces honor students for first semester 



The students of Carmel High 
School have achieved academic 
honors for the first semester. They 
are: 

Seniors 
Superiors Honors (All A's) 

Grace Anderson, (Catherine Blank, 
Shannon Boyle, John Dam, Jacqueline 
Greco, Kelly Groen, Jennifer Hanna, Ash- 
ley Hodge, Christopher Horist, Kevin Kail- 
towski, Paul Niziolck, John Plescla, Jen- 
nifer Rohalla, Christine Ryndak, Julie 
Weiler, Jessica Welntritt 
High Honors (3.50+ GPA) 

Caroline Anderson, Jonathan An- 
derson, Timothy Arvidson, Janine Bern- 
hardt, Katherine Boniquit, Lisa Casarru- 
bias, Chris Chapman, Richard Charts, 
David Chilicki, Allison Clark, Jennifer 
Dille, Nicholas Ellsseou, Chris Fairfield, 
Benjamin Fitzharris, Christine Fusz, 
MaryAnn Gerlach, Patrick Glazik, Molly 
Halvey, Amy Hanson, Nirvana Harris, 
Moira Hopman, Kara Jakaitis. 

James Jankowski, Peter Jones, Kristi- 
na Kasper, Megan Kasper, Stephan Krae- 
mer, Elaine Kratohwil, Amle Kristan, Jen- 
nifer Krizman, Nathan Kucera, Michael 
Kwiatt, Molly Larson, Philip Latter, An- 
drew LeBoeuf, Kevin LemanskJ, Erin 
LoBue, Brian Lynch, Jill Lynch, Lowell 
Mangiibat, Katherine Markham, Jessica 
Mullen, Amber Mulvey, Karen Nakon, 
Ansel Narikkattu. 

Alexander Newton, Peter Nustra, 
Elizabeth O'Brien, Kelin O'Donnell, Sarah 
Oplawski, Mary Pietryga, Tiffany 
Pundzus, Michael Rems, Kyla Richtman, 
Melissa Ron, Margaret Rupprecht, Lind- 
say Ryg, Patrick Salvi, Megan Savickis, Je- 
remy Schmidt, Denisc Schroeder, Karen 
Schulien, Jennifer Scifo, Laura Sheehan, 
Sophia Stergiou, Steven Tschanz, Melin- 
da Urban, David VanSpankeren, Michael 
Waldeck, Marissa Wasseluk, Ryan 
Williams, Kiri Wolf-Lewis, Jacqueiline 
Woodward, Keith Zomchek 
Honors (3.0-f GPA) 

Kathryn Bieda, Anne Borling, 
Joseph Bruttomcsso, Dcnise Donatich, 
Rebecca Eccles, Carolina Fabian, David 
Flynn, Perla Frescas, Sara Graham, Na- 
dia Hummer, Jennifer Keller, Andrew 
Konicek, Erin Kristan, Kelly Krombach, 
Jeffrey Lancioni, Byrne McAuliffe, Maria 
Mctropulos, Jcnilynn Rcdila, Anne 
Rosenthal, Kimberly Stroz, Kevin 
Tekampe 
lunlors 
Superior Honors (All A's) 

Blair Daus, Brian Dolan, Evangeline 



Kadera, Karrie Koch, Gerald Maddalozzo, 
Matthew Muto, Samantha Rinella, 
Michael Ryan, Kristen Satala, Jessica 
Schmitz, Dannielle Sita, Kateri Swiss, 
Jacqueline Wilson 
High Honors (3.50+ GPA) 

Avery Amores, Frederick Ang, Kelly 
Bacehowski, Paul Baiilargeon, Nicole 
Bakota, Jennifer Ballard, Michael Bau- 
mann, Lisa Berrones, Jennifer Boarini, 
Nicole Binlquit, Brittany Brown, Matthew 
Buckingham, Eric Buckman, Stephanie 
Bunnell, Nicholas Canning, Michelle 
Caraballo, Mark Castillo, Rebecca Claw- 
son, Ashley Culbertson. 

Victoria Davis, Allison Dowe, 
Christopher Fagnant, Theresa Federer, 
Daryll Fletcher, Carta Freeman, Laura 
Gage, Kristin Graff, Alex Heffernan, Jan- 
ice Henderson, Marilyn Holguln, Andrew 
Idrizovic, Daphne Kakaiya, Kevin Keegan, 
Kelly Kendziorskj, Jonathan Kolb, Patrick 
Laud, Robert Magee, Sarah Martersteck, 
Douglas Matiasck, Kelly McWhorter, An- 
thony Mistretta. 

Mary Beth Moroney, Bonnie Mu- 
ran, Patrick Murray, Teresa Napoli, 
Meghan Oelerich, Edward Ogunro, David 
Pazely, Elizabeth Planas, Peter Plescla, 
Kristin Redfearn, Katherine Rhedin, 
Rachel Sanders, Larua Sbcrtoll, Angela 
Achirbcr, Carl Schmidt, Stephanie Shel- 
ley, Brian Sherman, Brian Smith, Bryan 
Smith, Brandan Strickland. 

Annette Sutfin, Karen Swiat, 
Stephen Swieton, Sabrina Talarovich, 
Bemadctte Terrado, Rebecca Torres, 
Claire Trimarco, Tara Turner, Jamie We- 
gener, Lauren Waudzunas, John Walter, 
Daniel Weintritt, Sara Weisbrod, Kevin 
Williams, Mia Wilson, Kathryn Zegar 
Honors (3.0+ GPA) 

Matthew Andrukaltis, Dustin 
Barnes, Nicholas Barnes, Kenneth 
Blaszak, Joseph Budy, Scott DcHaan, 
Kevin Gas, Elizabeth Keevan, Sheila 
Kennedy, Elizabeth Koelper, Kimberly 
Lauritzcn, Jason McCord, Jonathan 
Mikrut, Christopher Noonan, Brent 
Nowak, Patrick Parsons, Katharine 
Quado, Thomas Quille, Christina Sapien- 
za, Jonathan Turlington 
Sophomores 
Superior Honors (All A's) 

Tara Anders, Matthew Assad, Sara 
Bert, Teresa Boarini, Carolyn Cain, Collin 
Glancy, Joanna Harchur, Janelle Klio, 
Paul Kizior, Robin Lizzo, Amanda Majcs- 
ki, Ashley McDoncll, Bradley Michalsen, 
Kelly O'Neill, Stephanie Riley, Maura 
Schoen, Emikly Sylwestrak, Anne Tayler, 
Michael VandenBoom 



High Honors (3.50+ GPA) 

Kathryn Alfaers, Jennifer Amato, 
Elizabeth Arvidson, Christopher Balzer, 
Michael Basche, Laura Bassett, Tricia 
Blomgren, Scott Brody, Shane Campion, 
Jessica Cesar, Thomas Chapman, John 
Coll, Michael Cook, Kevin Cornell, Joshua 
Cummins, Margaret Dolan, Julie Dren- 
nan, Michael Duffy, Jennifer Durrant, 
Rachel Fagnant, Jonathan Fromm, David 
Gabrel, Beaulivea Greene. 

Morgan Grimes, Andrew Hasdal, 
Ann Heady, Joshua Kanuch, Elliott Khay- 
at, Eric Knight, Nicole Kopier, Lindsay 
Kulla, Sarah Kwasigroch, Anne Kwiatt, 
Johnathan Landers, John Lavelle, Lauren 
Linsner, Sarah Madison, Siiri Marquardt, 
Christine Martinson, Erin McGinn, Diana 
Metropulos, Nicole Mierzeiewski, 
Stephanie Miller, Samir Mirza, Thomas 
Morrow, Chelsea Mulvey. 

David Nannini, Nicole Obie, Bran- 
don Paluch, Crystal Pauley, Andrew 
Petkus, Billy Pettit, Helena Phan, Maria 
Rito, Andrea Sapienza, Sarah Scalzitti, 
James Scherman, Jessica Schuda, Heidi 
Schuster, Clare Sheehan, Melissa Slezak, 
Steven Sniegowski, Nicole Snyder, Ryan 
Spude, Julie Steplyk, Elizabeth Strus, 
Heather Titus, Alexandria Trubatisky, 
Brett Uhler, Matthew VanSpankeren, 
William Walton, Brett Wells, Joseph Wil- 
son, Daniel Wisniewski, Ryan Woodward, 
Valerie Yellln, Elizabeth Zimmcr. 



Honors (3.0+ GPA) 

Jamie Cyrzan, Tiffany Davis, Chnsti- 
na Dczelan, Catherine Happ, Katherine 
Hoefllch, Christopher llling, John Jansta, 
Christine Kirchner, Monique Maestas, 
Katherine Michalak, Rebecca Mon- 
terastelll, Peter Olakowski, Michael Pad- 
dock, Anthony Parisi, John Poletto, 
Joseph Pultorak, Rebecca Saclolo, Mar- 
garet Scheitz, Melissa Schullz, Bridget 
Stone, Brooke Taff, Tania Topete, John 
Weiler 

Freshmen 

Superior Honors (All A's) 

Danlce Brown, Quinttn Cappellc, 
Marisa Cochrane, Keri Coleman, Molly 
Day, John Flessner, Amy Heatherman, 
Katie Heffernan, Lauren Hensley, Ryan 
Knigge, Sarah LoBue, Kelll Maguirc, 
Katherine Meyer, Annmarie Noonan, 
Katlierine O'Donnell, Kathleen Przywara, 
Joseph Quille, AnnMarie Tschanz, 
Meredith Walton 
High Honors (3.50+ GPA) 

Justin Alvarez, Amanda August, 
Eileen Badcr, Jordan Brown, scan Cap;is- 
trant, Brian Clifton, Elizabeth Coffey, 
Joseph Coll. Sarah Collins, James Caluga, 
Ray David, Mary Devine, Senneca Di- 
Tusa, Sarah Fairfield, Alexandra Fisher, 
Melissa Fisher, Ryan Foust, Michael 
Gabricle, Jennifer Hamlet, Laura Ham- 
man, Joseph Hammer, William Hen- 



dricks, Nellie Herchenbach, Chris Hlron- 
Imus, Michele Hojnacki, Kevin Jackson, 
Brian Kime, Kathryn Klein. 

Blake Kurinsky, Kyran Lambert, Erin 
Latham, Justyna Lenik, Elizabeth lev- 
asseur, Lauren Lucas; Bryan Luczkiw, 
Stephen Macrowski, Marianne Marshall, 
Jessica Masnik, Ashley Mullen, Joseph 
Muran, Ryan Myers, Diana Ogurek, 
Amanda Plrlh, Mariko Plescla, Peter 
Pontarelll. 

Joshua Robinson, Kyle Robinson, 
JJto Santos, Robert Schaser, Kristen Ser- 
na, Dana Smith, Emllie .Smith, Sarah 
Sponseller, Ryan Tackett, Michael Tokarz, 
Ryan Tritschler, Ashley Turkington, Lasz- 
lo Varju, Alissa Vcrriey, Andrea Verney, 
Matthew Wagner, Glenn Zomchek, 
Matthew Zwols Id 
Honors (3.0+ GPA) 

Megan Anderson, Anthony An- 
drcasik, Christy Belanger, Ryan Bench, 
Vincent Boarini, Kimberly Bowden, 
Patrick Bowler, Rebecca Culbertson, Jef- 
frey Dax, Frank Fiore, Jessica Fitzharris, 
Franccsca Gagliano, Brian Goldsbcrry, 
Ashley Goudreau, Katherine Hertel, An- 
drewjones, Calccn Kennedy, Scott Lltvin, 
John Markham, Meghan McCall, 
Matthew Meyers, Tracy Navar, Shaun 
Nunag, Christopher Olson, Matthew 
Potcmpa, David Rogowskl, Brian Ron- 
ayne, Meghan Ryan, Krystal Sanchez, 
Rachel Schweitzer, Matthew Wilkinson. 



FROM PAGE Al 



CORONER 



deputy coroner for three years, un- 
raveled after Richardson initiated a 
private investigation into his back- 
ground. Richardson said some "odd" 
things that Locke was doing gave her 
cause to begin the investigation. She 
would not elaborate on the nature of 
his actions. 

According to Danaj, the Human 
Resource Dept. acts as a centralized 
job-posting function. He pointed out 
that the department is responsible for 
the screening of minimal application 




requirements by a potential county 
employee, but it is up to the individ- 
ual county offices to do a more in- 
tense check. 

"This was a very extraordinary 
case," stated Danaj. "The issue 
wouldn't have come to notice unless 
the position warranted a more de- 
tailed search." 

Danaj went on to say that the 
county is "very cognizant" of higher 
levels of screening for potential law 
enforcement employees and depart- 
ment heads. 

Danaj noted that Locke did 
provide, what appeared to be, a 
valid state issued driver's license at 
the time of his application for the 
deputy coroner position. He also 
said his department never received 
a report of error from the Social Se- 
curity Administration (SSA) in re- 



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and gaining momentum, and Mr. 
Kirk is far behind." 

According to Jeff Hartley, cam- 
paign manager for Shawn Donnelley, 
the only female Republican candi- 
date, Porter's endorsement came as 
no surprise. 

"Porter's endorsement was the 
worst kept secret in the 10 th district," 
stated Hartley. "We expected it later 
in the race, but given Kirk's inability 
to raise enough money to compete, it 
stands to reason that Porter would 
endorse him now." 




■~r. ■.■^ix.,"^i.i 'i* .;;'*---«--.■ --': • ^ ^.v^:-.. \ L_. -i-. 





PUBLIC NOTICE 
NOTICE OF LIEN SALE 
Request a Notice of Lien Sale be 
Published on the following listed Units. 
Household & Misc. Items Unit No. 4 
Billle Jo Deem 
Antioch, I L 60002 

Household & Misc. Items Unit No. 27 
Scott Stephenson 
Salem, Wl 53168 

Household & Misc. Items Unit No. 48 
Nick Baldassano 
Fox Lake, IL 60020 
Salon Equip. Unit No. 63 
Autumn Garcia, Antioch. IL 60002 
Household & Misc. Items Unit No. 68 
Kristen Bowsher, Spring Grove, IL 
60081 

Household & Misc. Items Unit No. 70 
Trudy Blakely, Salem, Wl 53168 
Household & Misc, Items Unit No. 120 
Michael Buzzell, Trevor, Wl 53179 
Household & Misc. Items Unit No. 144 
Verna Kolar, Cicero, IL 60650 
Household & Misc. Items Unit No. 160 
Shannon Sweet, Woodstock, IL 60098 
Household & Misc. Items Unit No. 193 
Ben|amln Watkins, Gumee, IL 60031 
Household & Misc. Items Unit No. 212 
Melissa Stobaugh, Antioch, IL 60002 
Household & Misc. Items Unit No. 217 
Charles Sinclair, Long Grove, IL 60047 
LIEN SALE WILL BE HELD: 
Date: 3/3/00 Time: 10 a.m. 
Location: Antioch Self Storage 
Sincerely, 
Elaine Wertz 
Pres 

0200D-3183-AN 

February 25, 2000 

March 3, 2000 



gard to Locke's wages reports and 
social security number, which was 
later discovered to belong to his 
deceased father. 

Subsequent reports were made 
to the SSA, Internal Revenue Service 
and the Illinois Municipal Revenue 
Service concerning Locke's.fraudu- 
lent use of the social security num- 
ber, said Danaj. 

"There is always going to be a 
certain amount of fraud, but it's usu- 
ally less than 1 percent," said Nancy 
O'Hara, assistant manager of the SSA 
office in Waukegan. 

O'Hara said that "suspense files" 
are about as technical as the SSA can 
get in regard to mismatched social 
security numbers. If reported earn- 
ings on employer wage reports do 
not match up to the right individual, 
then those earnings are placed in a 
"suspense file" untilthe SSA can 
identify the correct owner. Howev- 
er, she also pointed out that there is 
a lapse of about one to two years 
when it comes to SSA reports, thus 
delays may occur in notifying em- 
ployers of potential errors with em- 
ployee-provided social security 
numbers. 



PORTER 



Schulien (R-Libertyville) lost the 
ICAPC's endorsement to George Bell 
Jr. of Libertyville. 

District 19 incumbent, Robert 
Grever (R-Kildeer) also missed the 
boat. The ICAPC is endorsing chal- 
lenger Michael Talbett of Lake 
Zurich. 

The ICAPC, based In Lake Coun- 
ty but consisting of 400 members 
from Lake, Cook and DuPage coun- 
ties, issued all prospective candidates 
a list of 10 questions pertaining to en- 
vironmental concerns within Lake 
County. 






PUBLIC NOTICE 
Notice Is hereby given that on Feb- 
ruary 26, 2000 at 9 a.m. a sale will be 
held at 10705 Main Street, Richmond, 
IL 60071 lo sell the following articles to 
enforce a Hen existing under the laws 
of the State of Illinois against such ar- 
ticles for labor, service, skill or materi- 
al extended upon a storage furnished 
(or such articles at the request of the 
following designated parsons, unless 
such articles are redeemed within thir- 
ty days of the publication of this notice. 
Owner - Tracy Hager 
Vehicle - 1991 Saturn Coupe 
y\nff - 1G8ZH147XM21 12779 
Amount owed - $1982.07 
Owner - Kenneth Miller and Con- 
sumer Portfolio Services Inc. 
Vehicle -1989 Ford F-1 50 
Vin0 - 1FTEF14N8KLB38841 
Amount owed - $1 ,984.09 

0200B-3155-FL 
February 1 1,2000 
February 18, 2000 
February 25, 2000 



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iil^liV^*^"**^-* • J%«-*'.S-» » *"--— -~~— ~^ — — 



February 25,2000 



COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers / C3 






■ 



if 



i 



i 



i 



AT A GLANCE 



A DIGEST OF STORIES MAKING HEADLINES THROUGHOUTOUR REGION 



n 



Village officials divided on peaker issue 

LibertyvlIIe— Officials are still divided as the Libertyville 
Township prepares for their advisory referendum concerning 
the peaker plant 

The referendum vote on the March 21 ballot is to call the 
attention of township and village officials over whether a $100 
million peaker power plant should be built in the Mallory In- 
dustrial Park, located at Rte. 137 and Harris Rd. near the Lib- 
ertyville-Grayslake border. 

Opponents of the plant collected over 2,000 signatures 
from residents concerned with possible air and noise pollu- 
tion, water consumption and a need for power. 

The possible building of the plant is now being covered at 
public hearings being held by the libertyville Planning Com- 
mission. The next meeting will take on place March 1. 

Pleviak receives bomb threat 

Lake Villa— At approximately 5 p.m. on Feb. 16 an 
anonymous caller made a bomb threat to a teacher's voice ( 
mail at Pleviak School. The building was searched by Lake Vil- 
la police, who characterized the search results as "negative,", 
meaning nothing was found. Police retrieved the phone num- 
ber, and located the suspect, a 14 year old, who is neither a 
student in District 41, nor a resident of Lake Villa. The suspect 
admitted to making the call. No motive for the call has been 
determined. Charges of felony disorderly conduct have been 
filed. A court date is pending. 

Teens arrested for string of burglaries 

Mundeleln — Two Gurnee residents were arrested for a 
string of burglaries in Mundelein, Libertyville arid Waukegan. 

Mundelein Police arrested Alan Robinson, 18, and a 16- 
year-old juvenile at 4 a.m. on Feb. 17 after they allegedly bur- 
glarized Dollar General, 350 Townline Rd,, and A & G Meats, 
368TownlineRd. 

During a routine check of the businesses, police noticed 
that the front door of the Dollar General had been broken. 
Upon further investigation, they found that A & G had been 
broken into as well. Investigators said that a vehicle, with the 
keys in the ignition, belonging to Robinson was found in the 
parking lot in front of the businesses. 

After being taken into custody, Robinson and the juvenile 
made statements about their involvement in the two burglar- 
ies, as well as other burglaries in Mundelein, Libertyville and 
Waukegan. 

The juvenile was charged with three counts of burglary for 
the Mundelein incidents. He was remanded to the Huolse De- 
tention' Center. '' 

Robinson faces four counts of burglary. He was remanded 
to the Lake County Jail. 

Two arrested after police chase 

Round lake Beach— Two men were arrested on Feb. 19 
after stealing $450 worth of baby formula from Super Kmart in 
Round Lake Beach. 

Kendall A King, Sr., 34, of Waukegan, and Robert B. Evans, 
Jr., 37, of Zion, were both charged with retail theft. King was 
also charged with reckless driving, driving while license sus- 
pended, and fleeing and eluding police. 

According to police reports, King asked Evans if he wanted 
to make some money through stealing baby formula for resale 
at a store in Cook County. 

Evans distracted the store greeter as King pushed his cart 
through a closed register and out to their vehicle. 

The men led police on a chase, driving through several red 
lights at accelerated speeds of over 85 mph. 

During the pursuit, the offenders' vehicle struck a white 
Jeep on Rte. 45 and another vehicle in Lake County's jurisdic- 
tion, said reports. 

Board rejects subdivision plan 

Grayslake— Plans for the Helen's Crossing housing de- 
velopment have once again stalled. After much deliberation, 
the Grayslake Village Board rejected a 130 home sketch plan 
presented by Hoffman Homes president Norm Hassinger. 




Thats a wrap 

Lieutenant Bob Klelnheinz of the Libertyville Fire De- 
partment talks with Matt Earl Beesley, assistant di- 
rector of the John Hughes-produced movie "New Port 
South," during filming at Libertyville High School's 
Brainerd Building Feb. 19.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



Despite a decrease from the 180 home plan presented in 
September, board members requested that Hassinger once 
again lower the number of housing units. 

Trustees John MacAulay, Stacy Braverman and Cheryl 
Doros refused to support a plan that included more than 1 10 
housing units. The board members stated that a drastic in- 
crease in residents would burden schools, roads and local Ore 
and police departments. 

"I promised people (residents) that I would do the best I 
could to control growth and to keep it at a minimum level," 
MacAulay stated. 

On the contrary, Trustee Timothy Perry said village mem- 
bers would have access to the open space around the subdivi- 
sion. 

"Local residents could gain access to about 70 acres of open 
space at no cost, which would be a donation from the develop- 
ers to the public," Perry said. 

Board honors cul-de-sac request 

Gurnee— Gurnee Village trustees listened to the voice of 
the people, agreeing to instruct Cambridge Homes, Inc. to cul- 
de-sac Cascade Way as part of an annexation agreement for the 
proposed Timberwoods II subdivision. 

Despite a favorable reccomendation by the village plan 
commission to extend Cascade Way to Almond Rd., residents 



opposed the street extension because of the potential for cut- 
through traffic from Washington St. 

Schools may merge 

Spring Grove— Spring Grove Elementary District 11 and 
Richmond Elementary District 13 may be a combined school 
district by the end of the year. 

Voters in both districts will have an opportunity to ap- 
. prove a unit district on the March 21 ballot. A new school 
board would be created for the kindergarten to eighth grade 
district. Nine school board candidates are competing for sev- 
en slots. 

Current Richmond District administrators Diane Bushing, 
James A. Hasken, Lynn Hunter and Thomas Wisinski will be 
vying for spots on the combined board. Michael E. Guillifor," 
Nadine Kattner, Scott A. Mackey Daniel Vetter are running for 
the Spring Grove District Jovita Kems of Richmond is also 
running. 

Antioch unveils new police station 

Antioch— The new Antioch Police Station will make its 
public debut on Sunday, Feb. 27. A open house for the new 
facility is planned from 1-4 p.m. The official ribbon cutting is 
scheduled for 2 p.m. Coffee and cake will be served. 

The new building will include administrative offices, pa- 
trol functions and holding facilities. Seperate entrances for 
suspects and witnesses on two different levels offer additional 
privacy. 

The station is located at 433 Orchard St. just west of the ex- 
isting main Are station. Police staff are scheduled to begin 
moving into the facility on Feb. 28. 

Man wins record-breaking show prize 

Iindenhurst— Lt.. David Legler (USN), Lindenhurst resi- 
dent who works at the Great Lakes Naval Training Center in 
North Chicago, won a total of $1,765,000 in a three-day run 
on the quiz show "Twenty-One." His final appearance aired 
on NBC on Feb. 16. The prize was the largest ever won by 
anyone on a television game show. Lt Legler had already 
planned to leave the Navy in Nov. to pursue his MBA at the 
University of Chicago. The cash will be sent to him in a lump 
sum, less taxes, in about 3 months. Legler and his wife Amy 
intend to remain indefinitely in their one-year old house in 
Lindenhurst. 

Scout wins national art contest 

Round Lake— Eight-year-old Ryan Ornstein , of Round 
Lake Cub Scout Pack 175, should have no trouble selling pop- 
corn for their fall 2000 fund-raiser. 

Ornstein won third place in a national art contest spon- 
sored by Trail's End popcorn. In October, his face and art- 
work, along with the first and second place winners, will ap- 
pear on the canister. 

The talented third-grader, who attends William L Thomp- 
son School in Lake Villa, used watercolors and crayons to cre- 
ate a fall scene for the contest. 
. The canisters will also bear the winners' hometowns. 

"It will be an honor to Round Lake Beach, and the State of 
Illinois," said his father, Steve Ornstein. 

Stiff competition at regional spelling bee 

Round Lake— The tension was thick in the Round Lake 
High School theater on Feb. 22 for section III of the 2000 Lake 
County Spelling Bee hosted by Magee Middle School. 

Forty-three contestants soon became two: Kyle Menary of 
Washington Grade School in Mundelein versus Kate Guama 
of Fremont School in Mundelein. 

Menary misspelled "terraqueous," but was still in the 
game, For Guarna to take it all, she had to spell two words 
correctly— apparition and solder. 

Guama, a sixth-grader, succeeded and walked away with 
two trophies, one for herself and one for Fremont School, 
presented by Ed Gonwa, Lake County Superintendent of 
Schools. * 




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C4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OPINIONS 



February 25, 2000 



Lakeland Newspapers 



William H. Schroeder 

Publisher 



Neal Tucker 

Executive Editor/ 
Operations Manager 



Robert Warde 

Managing Editor 



30 South Whitney St., Grayslake, Illinois 60030 
Tel: (047) 223-8161. E-mail: edlt@lnd.com 



EDITORIALS 



Forefronts winners 
enhance our lives 

Lakeland's Top 10. 
Who are these people, the recipients of the annual Lakeland 
Newspapers Forefronts awards? 
First of all, they are citizens who are distinguished not for 
who they are, but how they contribute to bettering our community 
and neighboring communities in Lake County. Selected from all walks 
of life, Forefronts Award recipients represent the highest standard of 
selfless, individual contribution without thought of recognition, re- 
ward or personal agrandizement. Their effort enriches family living 
and community life. 

The Forefronts Award was initiated by this newspaper and associ- 
ated Lakeland papers six years ago to focus the spotlight on exemplary 
citizenship. The idea was to not only recognize achievement, but also 
provide a beacon for others to follow. In the end, we all are better for 
the good deeds of our neighbors. 

We invite you to get acquainted with the Year 2000 Forefronts win- 
ners in a special section included in this week's edition of your home- 
town Lakeland newspaper. At the same time, join with us in extending 
congratulations to a distinguished, worthy group of men and women. 



Teen Court idea 
keeps growing 

Teen Court is expanding again, this time to the Antioch/Lin- 
denhurst area and North Chicago. June 1 is the target start- 
up. 
An innovative peer focused adjunct to the traditional crim- 
inal justice system, Teen Court is designed to instill pride and charac- 
ter in young people who serve as jurors and attorneys, as well as the 
youthful offenders who come before them. 

Teen Court has been operating successfully in the Round Lake 
area, Lake Forest/Lake Bluff, Warren Township, Wauconda Township 
and Waukegan. The program is administered by Northern Illinois 
Council on Alcoholism & Substance Abuse (NICASA). Police depart- 
ments in the participating communities have applications for youth 
aged 14 to 18 interested in serving as jurors and attorneys. 

Peer pressure has long been looked upon as a source of misdirec- 
tion in our young people. Teen Court utilizes the same peer pressure 
in a positive way. Besides providing an avenue for early intervention, 
Teen Court compliments community-policing efforts. 
A date in Teen Court is one event both wayward youth and their par- 
ents can look upon as a helpful step on the often difficult path to 
adulthood. 



Clinton legacy: 
crushing scandal 

As he winds down his last year in office, President Clinton is 
said to be devoting uncommon energy these days to identi- 
fying his place in history. The legacy thing. One school of 
thought is that he sees himself as guiding the nation through 
a golden age of economic progress. That's the economy thing. 

Even uncompromising Republicans have to admit that President 
Clinton has had his hands on the throttle during the remarkable eco- 
nomic boom of the 1990s. His doing?That can be the subject of end- 
less debate. 

Yes, indeed, America, is enjoying historic prosperity. President 
Clinton played a role, to what degree debatable to be sure, in reduc- 
tion of the nation's draining deficit. We feel strongly, though, that Lake 
County's two representatives in Congress helped identify President 
Clinton's legacy with their support of impeachment in connection 
with the Lewinsky Oval Office sex scandals. We wholeheartedly sup- 
port Congressmen Phil Crane and John Porter, long-serving and high- 
ly respected, for their votes to impeach the flawed President, and thus 
did their part in establishing a President's legacy. - 

Clinton supporters in our midst, at least in part, are following the 
fine old American custom of voting their pocketbooks. Times couldn't 
be better. In our mind, the best description of the retiring President is 
unfulfilled promise. How shameful. How wasteful. 







VIEWPOINT 



2 books to enjoy: 
baseball, building 



What's me latest in 
bookstores normally 
isn't part of the news 
beat of this column. 
But when fresh, original writing on 
interesting subjects is made avail- 
able to the public, and it has a 
strong Lake County flavor, I want to 
share the discovery with you. 

Two new books fitting that cate- 
gory cover favorite subjects of your 
columnist; baseball and new home 
construction/remodeling. The only 
relationship between the titles is 
that the authors have strong ties to 
Lake County. Let's take a look. 

"Luxury Homes and lifestyles" is 
a coffee table book featuring exquis- 
ite photography written by Orren 
Pickell, me Bannockbum based de- 
signer and builder whose reputation 
has spread throughout the nation. 
Six years in the writing, "Base- 
ball Play America" is a carefully 
thought out, meticulously re- 
searched road map for restoring me 
national pastime to prominence 
from the sandlots to die major 
leagues. With a compelling message 
and an easy-to-read style, the plan 
for baseball was written by Don 
Weiskopf, who grew up in Uie Liber- 
tyville-Mundelein area. Weiskopf is a 
retired college professor whose ca- 
reer includes teaching, coaching, 
and recreation and park administra- 
tion. Most of all, Weiskopf provides 
an antidote to a beloved sport spi- 
raling out of control due to greed. 

Anyone who dreams about meir 
dream house will enjoy Pickell 's 
beautifully printed book featuring 
the design /build concept where the 
owner and builder immerse mem- 
selves in every step of the home 
construction process. Pickell de- 
votes considerable space to creativi- 
ty and design, explaining how the 
scope, style and character of a cus- 
tom-built home springs to life from 
concept drawings and blueprints. As 
an avid greenthumber, I especially 
enjoyed attention to landscaping 
and a wide array of photographs of 
home exteriors. Almost all of me 
photos were shot in Lake County. 

If Weiskopf leaves anything left 
unsaid about how baseball can be 
improved at all levels, it's not appar- 
ent with input from 2,000 coaches, 
administrators, media people, 
columnists and broadcasters. 
Weiskopf isn't afraid to "take on" de- 
ficiencies of a game he loves and 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 







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W& 



Weiskopf: Wants to 
restore baseball 




Pickell: Book is 

excellent "coffee table" 
material 

says is worth saving because base- 
ball is ingrained in our culture and 
our language. 

At the major league level, 
Weiskopf deplores the juiced up 
ball, artificial turf and a rampant 
drug problem. Some how, owners 
must find a way to make attendance 
affordable for middle and low in- 
come families. To keep minor 
leagues viable, Wieskopf sees the 
need for women's leagues, increased 
parent club financial support and 
maintaining small town involve- - 
ment. Lake County fans will love his 
"blue print" for acquiring an inde- 
pendent league franchise. 



The former Libertyville High 
athlete is no blue nose purist regard- 
ing college baseball. Weiskopf wants 
to stress revenue enhancement, 
much like football and basketball, to 
fast-track player development and ,, , 
prepare collegians for pro careers. , • 

Weiskopf encourages stimula- 
tion of local rivalries, Sunday after- . 
noon games and family support to 
support development of non-pro, 
semi-pro and adult leagues. At the 
youth level, Weiskopf calls for more 
"fun" games and less tournaments.- 
Take note parents: author Weiskopf 
says less parental pressure and cool- 
headed coaches will make baseball 
more enticing to boys and girls. His 
attention to fine points is illustrated 
by recommending a ban on curve 
ball pitching for boys 12 and under. 

In short, after 150 years, the 
game of baseball, a true American 
phenomenon, desperately needs a 
renaissance, in Weiskopf 's opinion. 

Weiskopf and Pickell have a lot . 
to say to lovers of custom architec- 
ture and lovers of America's national 
pastime. Make space on your book- 
shelf for both books. 

Chief Hot Dog 

Now that University of Illinois 
officials once again have decided to 
reopen debate on whether the dig- 
nified and beloved Chief Illiniwek is 
an appropriate mascot in our politi- 
cally correct society, it might be wise 
to start thinking about an alterna- 
tive. How about a life-size frank- 
furter with gangly arms and legs, 
and a smiley face? Instead of the 
Fighting Illini, the Orange and Blue 
could become known as the Fight- 
ing Weenies. Might work. At least a 
bouncing, friendly hot dog might 
satisfy snooty professors and fuzzy- 
brained liberals who see Chief Illini- 
wek as outdated and racist. 

New stalking curb 

Cyberstalking is going to be il- 
legal in Illinois if legislation now 
under consideration is adopted. A 
bill introduced by State Rep. Lau- 
ren Beth Gash (D-Highland Park) 
broadens the definition of stalking 
already on the books. Taboo will be 
placing a person under surveil- 
lance through electronic means 
with intent to do harm to a person, 
including family members. Two 
separate instances will open the 
door to prosecution. 






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February 25, 2000 



OPTIONS 



Lakeland Newspapers/, C5 ' 



r 



< 



PARTY LINES 



PARTY. LINES, THE LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS' COLUMN OF POLITICAL OPINION, 

IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS. 





likes newcomer Talbett 



Members of the Lake 
County Conservation 
Alliance, a pro-environ- 
ment, pro-open space 
action; group, were gushing in their 
support of first term Lake Zurich Vil- 
lage Trustee Michael Talbett who 
is attempting to wrest a Republican 
nomination from veteran Lake 
County Board Rep. Robert Grever 
(R-Kiideer). 

Talbett is loaded with academic 
credentials, including a law degree, 
and has extensive experience in en- 
vironmental law. He also serves as 
Lake Zurich's representative to the 
Stormwater Management Commis- 
sion. 

Longtime ElaTownship supervi- 
sor, Grever has been rocked by well 
publicized divorce proceedings and 
an unsuccessful challenge of his resi- 
dential requirements, Grever still is 
rated a solid favorite for reelection. 

The conservation group also is 
endorsing longtime Republican in- 
dependents for reelection, Suzi 
Schmidt of Lake Villa/Lindenhurst 
and Larry Leafblad of the 
Grayslake-Round Lake area. The 
group also will back newcomer 
George Bell in Libertyvllle and in- 
cumbent Democrat Carol Spiel- 
man of Highland Park. 

The alliance skipped endorse- 
ments in three contested districts 
now served by Republicans — Dis- 
trict 4, Jim LaBelle; District 5/- 
Boiuiie Thomson Carter and Dis- 
trict 17, Stevenson Mountsler. 
Carter and Mountsier are running 
for second terms. LaBelle is retiring 
from public office. The shun was not 
explained, 




Peterson: Seperated 
at birth from Steve 
Forbes? 




Davis: Still a 
political target 

Second time 

lack O'Malley, once the high- 
flying Republican state's attorney of 
Cook County, is gunning for a sec- 
ond chance in public office after a 
Wisconsin sojourn in the private 
sector. Now a resident of Richmond, 
O'Malley is one of two candidates 
running for an Appellate Court 
judgeship in the northern Illinois 



district running to the Mississippi 
River. His opponent for a GOP nom- 
ination is Jim Rice, an attorney in 
DuPage County home of Republican 
aspirants for the bench. 

Peterson alone 

Now that Steve Forbes has ,. 
dropped out of the presidential race, 
State Senator Bill Peterson (R-Buf- 
falo Grove) has the soft-spoken de- 
meanor, and professorial appear- 
ance punctuated by rimless glasses 
to himself. Peterson and Forbes are 
look-alikes. 

Wants to be Mayor 

Village politicking won't begin 
until this fall for the 2001 municipal 
elections, but veteran Round Lake 
Beach Trustee Rich Hill reportedly 
is lining up support to challenge 
embattled Mayor Ralph Davis. 

Mike Jr. calling 

County Board Rep. Larry Leaf- 
blad (R-Highland Lake), chairman 
of Lake County Building, Planning 
and Zoning committee, says he 
thinks ever swirling growth prob- 
lems might be getting to him. "The 
other day I called Supervisor Mike 
Graham of Libertyville Township 
and said, "This is Mike Jr. calling." 
Graham is the father of the county's 
no growth movement After finding 
that there are plans for 8,000 new ■ 
homes in the Ahtloch area, leafblad 
tabulated building proposals in 
Avon Township (Grayslake and the 
Round Lake area) and came up with 
a figure of 6,000. "Enough is 
enough," Leafblad winced. 



Talkin' baseball, 




The Chicago Cubs' new man- 
ager, Don Baylor, has his 
own niche in baseball's all- 
time record book. 

His is a dubious achievement: In 
19 years in the major leagues he was 
hit by pitched balls a record 267 
times. 

"It's not exactly the kind of 
record I was hoping to be remem- 
bered for," says Baylor. 

From 1970 through 1988 he 
bounced around as an outfielder 
and pretty good hitter for six differ- 
ent teams. 

The Cubs haven't been to the 
World Series since 1945 and they 
had another disastrous season last 
year. But with a tough new manager 
and several new veteran players, 
hope springs eternal for "the noble 
knickered knights of Cubdom" and 
their legion of diehard fans. 

Speaking of baseball, I had a 
nice chat last fall with a Pfarr-family 
friend, Ray Berres, the former catch- 
er and great pitching coach for the 
Chicago White Sox. 

He's 92 now. I came across him 
at a local golf course. He still lives in 
Twin Lakes, Wis. He and my father 
were friends in their hometown of 
Kenosha, Wis. and Ray always took 
his car to be serviced at the gas sta- 
tion my dad and four brothers 
owned. 

When I was a tyke, my dad 
would take me to Wrigley Field 
when Ray was in Chicago catching 
for the Pittsburgh Pirates or the old 
Boston Bees. That's how I became a 
spoon-fed Cubs fan. 

Ray Berres was in the big 
leagues for 31 years, 11 as a player 
and 20 as a coach, mostly with the 
ChicagoWhlteSQX.TheSox.won . 
the American League pennant in 
1959, and at that team's 20-year re- 
union, players said the reason was 
Ray. 

"He was the best pitching coach 
I ever saw," said Bob Shaw. 




THE 

PFARR 

CORNER 

Jerry Pfarr 



"He was the greatest pitching 
coach of all," said Billy Pierce. 

He could watch a pitcher throw 
and immediately spot a mechanical 
flaw. He saved and prolonged the 
careers of numerous hurlers. Bob 
Keegan said every time he cashes his 
pension check he says, "Thankyou, 
Ray Berres." 

When Berres announced he 
would be retiring from the White Sox 
he received telegrams and phone 
calls from nine other teams, saying 
they would fire their pitching coach 
if he agreed to join their club. 

All, baseball. To get us in the 
mood here are a fewhall-of-fame 
quotes: 

Tommy Lasorda; the Los Ange- 
les Dodgers manager, when his wife 
complained that he loved baseball 
more than he loved hen "Well, 
maybe, but I love you more than 
football and basketball." 

Bob Uecker, the funny-man 
catcher "The highlight of my career 
came in Philadelphia when I saw a 
fan fall out of the upper deck. When 
he got up and walked away, the 
crowd booed." 

Pete Rose: Trh no different from 
anybody else with two arms, two 
legs, and 4,256 hits." 

Although many women are be- 
coming baseball fans, humorist 
Dave Bairy points out it's still a 
man's game: "If a woman has to 
choose be tween catching a fly ball 
and saving an infant's life, she will 
choose to save the infant's life with- 
out even considering if there are 
men on base." 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Is Jesse White as pure as snow? 



i, 



Is Jesse White immune from bad 
headlines? When it was re- 
vealed that the Tumblers wrote 
big checks to his campaign, we 
had to read about it deep inside an 
article about something else. His op- 
ponent in the last race wouldn't go 
negative, so Jesse White's false and 
embarrassing attack in a debate 
("My opponent is Lake County's 
biggest DUI defense lawyer") went 
unnoticed. 

The media ignores other huge 
gaffes, as well— White said he would 
fight fee increases, but didn't even 
attend George Ryan's State of the 
State address when license fee in- 
creases were unveiled. Why? He did- 
n't want to do anything to hurt the 
fee increases' chances. He bungled 
the Bourbonnais train aftermath. 
And, when Jesse White's employees 
were indicted this fall for crimes 
committed while White was Secre- 
tary of State, you had to read the ar- 
ticles with a magnifying glass to real- 
ize the most recent round of crimes 
were committed under his watch. 

His office has done nothing 
(other than to acquiesce to the feds) 
in dealing with the firestorm all 
around Ml White. The lines in the li- 
cense facilities are longer than ever, 
and fees are higher than ever. 

Now we hear from the Tribune 
(page 15, and, of course not in a 
headline— we wouldn't want to ap- 
pear to criticize Mr. White) that 
White increased the rent the state 
paid to Jerome Purze in Joliet to well 
over 100 percent of the real estate's 



value per year. And, what do you 
know, Purze contributed $25,000 to 
Jesse White's old pal, Mart Zwick. 
Oh, and what a coincidence— White 
is Swick"s campaign chairman. 
Though this was the largest contri- 
bution received by the campaign 
Jesse White chairs, White says, "I was 
not involved." Right. 

We made a mistake electing the 
Ryan-White team in '98, and the 
media needs to start treating Jesse 
White the same as they treat other 
politicians. 

Jill Me llendcr 
Lake Villa 

Need western hospital 

Less than sue months ago, my 
daughter became ill early one morn- 
ing while she was home alone. She is 
old enough to drive herself to get 
medical help, and fortunately, she 
did so. At 8 am. she left the house in 
search of medical attention. Two 
doctors refused to treat her, and a 
visit to the acute care center only re- 
sulted in the performing of routine 
tests. Her adventurous quest for 
help ended at 6 p.m. that night in 
the emergency room of Highland 
Park Hospital, where it was discov- 
ered she had an inflamed gallblad- 
der. I shudder to think what would 
have happened if this had been life- 
threatening. This is just another ex- 
ample of why we need a hospital in 
northwestern Lake County. 

The hospitals that exist in Lake 
County were built decades ago, 
when the population was mostly 



east of Milwaukee Ave. The eastern 
portions of the county had far more 
people than the west. Thus, our cur- 
rent hospitals were built at locations 
where the population could conve- 
niently access. Those in search of 
prompt medical needs could visit 
one of these hospitals in no time, for 
they were just a brief drive away. 
However, Lake County has seen 
many demographical changes since 
these hospitals were built 

The population has exploded in 
the western and northwestern parts 
of the county, and the future will 
bring more people. Avon township is 
on its way to building out, and Grant 
Township will most likely be next. 
Furthermore, Lake Villa and Antioch 
townships have huge potential for 
much more growth. Imagine how 
long it would take for a sick patient 
from any of these areas of the coun- 
ty to get to a hospital for immediate 
medical attention. The length of 
travel time to get from west to east 
makes a perfect argument for a hos- 
pital in the northwest part of the 
county. 

I understand that this is a huge 
undertaking, but I believe that the 
people that live in the northern and 
western parts of the county deserve 
the same medical service and avail- 
ability of emergency care as the resi- 
dents in the eastern part of our 
county. Many elderly people and 
families with young children have 
moved to this area, and they would 
be greatly serviced by the existence 
of a hospital located near them. 



Moreover many areas of McHenry 
County could also benefit from such 
a facility. 

Bob Powers 

Avon Township Republican 

Chairman Candidate, Lake 

County Board, Districts 

VA is needed 

I am writing to you on behalf of 
the important issue of North Chica- 
go Hospital being closed to in-pa- 
tient patients. If this Is allowed to 
happen the following scenario 
might happen to your or one of your 
loved ones someday. 

On Nov. 8, my husband, Robert 
Valek, was put through a long and 
detrimental day being in the current 
health he is in. Robert is a patient of 
North Chicago Hospital, but with 
the changes in the in-patient proce- 
dures of North Chicago, he was 
transferred to Westside VA Medical 
Center for pre-op for carotid 
surgery. Robert was too fragile for 
surgery. He currently suffers from 
heart failure, kidney failure, Parkin- 
son disease and Dementia Demen- 
tia is a serious condition where 
someone can wander off and not 
know where they are, who they are 
or what is going on around them. 

The reason and importance for 
you to hear this story is for you to 
realize how patients can get lost in 
the system or transport. The fear of 
having this happen to one of your 
family members has to make you 
aware of the importance of allow- 
ing North Chicagc to be open to 



in-patients so transfers/transports 
like this are not necessary. If North 
Chicago is closed to in-patients 
you too might have to face the fear 
of a loved one or yourself getting 
"lost in the system." The situation 
intensifies now since I have con- 
tacted Westside to find out what 
exactly happened. Of course, as 
expected, the Case Manager has 
changed the story. They are trying 
to cover up for their errors. Instead 
of people covering up for their 
mistakes and errors they should be 
trying to avoid problems and situ- 
ations like the one that happened 
on Nov. 8 to my husband. 

It is not about errors, to error is 
human. It is about quality of care of 
patients. To be treated in a hospital 
is "scary" nowadays and patients 
should not have to be afraid to get 
help. My husband could have wan- 
dered off into the hospital or in 
North Chicago somewhere and no 
one would have known about it be- 
cause no one knew why he was 
there. You should be able to go to 
your "home" hospital and be treated 
there. Not be shuffled around like a 
"sack of potatoes" and forgotten 
about. So I beg you to take this for , 
what it is worth and reconsider clos- 
ing North Chicago Hospital to in-pa- 
tients. 

Helen Valek 

Concerned citizen 
Round Lake Heights 



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MINDING 
?iYOUR OWN 
BUSINESS 

Don Taylor 

That isn't what 
I really wanted 

Most small-business 
owners know it's easy 
to get what you don't 
really want. So here's 
a little advice for all who make their 
living by serving others. Know what 
your customers want, and what 
they don't want. 

If you are in a service business, 
it is critical to serve exactly what is 
ordered. That is giving the customer 
what they want, the way they want 
it 

Here are some words of wis- 
dom I've gleaned from unhappy 
customers. While you may not be 
guilty of any of these specifically, I'll 
bet that you have some customers 
who aren't getting exactly what they 
want from you. Wise readers that 
you are, I know you'll wear the shoe 
if it fits. 

What I don't want... 
I don't want you to ignore my 
instructions. I am willing to listen to 
better ideas but since I am paying 
the bill, I want it my way. 

I don't want to pay for your 
mistakes. When your people screw 
up, I expect you to eat the cost and 
correct the problem quickly. If you 
pass the cost on to me, I'll find 
someone who makes fewer mis- 
takes. 

Don't tell me about the awards 
you've won. I want to grow my 
business not win awards. I don't 
care about the plaques and trophies 
you've got hanging on your walls. 
I'm paying for and expecting re- 
sults. 

I don't want excuses. If I'm not 
getting what I want, giving me 100 
valid reasons doesn't solve the 
problem. I expect you to make 
things happen not make excuses. 
I don't want to train your em- 
ployees. I don't want a bunch of 
kids to service my account. If I 
wanted kids to do my work I'd hire 
them and pay them less than I'm 
payingyou. I'll pay for what you 
know, not what you're learning. 

I don't want you to make 
promises you can't keep. If you 
can't do my work until Friday I can 
live with that. But if you promise 
Monday and don't start until 
Wednesday, I'll find another source. 

I don't want you to say you're 
sorry. I expect results not apolo- 
gizes. I'm not saying it's wrong to 
apologize, but if it happens very of- 
ten I'll look for someone who isn't 
as sorry as you are. 

I don't want you to change my 
company contact without letting 
me know, I value my business rela- 
tionships, and ours is based on 
trust. I don't like surprises, I have 
found new suppliers because of this 
very reason in the past. 

I don't want you to waste my 
time. I don't want to answer the 
same question over and over. I 
don't want to visit for 20 minutes 
about the ballgame. I don't care 
what you saw on TV last night. I was 
too busy to watch and I have more 
work to do now. 

1 don't want to be your most 
important customer. But I would 
like to be treated as if my business is 
important to you. 

I don't want you to run my 
company. I'll be happy if you run 
yours really well and serve me effec- 
tively. 

Don't try to buy or keep my 
business with freebies. You can buy 
my lunch if there's a good business 
reason for a discussion, but don't 
insult me with meaningless matter. 
Send die fruitcake to your great 
Aunt Edith. 

Some of you readers may feel 

Please see TAYLOR/ C7 




BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



February 25, 2000 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C6 



Company wins Great Lakes contract 



Versar's Lombard office to serve Naval 
training base, 15-states in the region 



Versar Inc. has announced the 
award of a technical support contract 
for regional environmental compli- 
ance and remediation consulting ser- 
vices for the U.S. Navy, Navy Public 
Works Center and Engineering Field 
Activity Midwest, Great Lakes. 

The contract will support a 15- 
state region across a wide variety of 
technical service areas. The Navy 
Training Center, Great Lakes is the 
U.S. Navy's only Recruit Training 



Command. The largest military in- 
stallation in Illinois and the largest 
Training Center in the Navy, the base 
includes 1,153 buildings on 1,628 
acres. 

Under this five-year, multiple or- 
der contract, Versar will provide a 
full range of environmental support 
services for air, water, solid/haz- 
ardous waste programs, Emergency 
Planning and Right to Know Act, 
Natural Resources, environmental 



impact studies and remediation sup - 
port for Navy, Marine Corps, and 
other government installations in 
the 15-state region, which includes 
Illinois, North Dakota, South Dako- 
ta, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, 
Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, 
Wisconsin, Kentucky, Ohio, Michi- 
gan, and Indiana. Versar will manage 
the contract from its Midwest re- 
gional office, located in Lombard, IL 
Dr. Ted Prociv, President of Ver- 
sar, said, "Versar is proud to contin- 
ue our long relationship with the 
U.S. Navy through this contract. 
Navy Training Center, Great Lakes is 
expected to expand as the major U.S. 



Navy training center, and Versar will 
support facility expansions, pollu- 
tion prevention, and environmental 
stewardship. We are pleased to ex- 
pand our role as a prime contractor 
for Navy environmental compliance 
and remediation services." 

Versar Inc., headquartered in 
Springfield, Virginia, is a publicly 
held resources management and in- 
frastructure services Firm. Versar 
provides its customers consulting, 
engineering, design and construc- 
tion, operations and maintenance, 
and environmental and energy ser- 
vices focused on enhancing cus- 
tomers' operating performance. 



Learn 
small 
business 
from CLC 



Individuals about to start a busi- 
ness can learn the skills necessary to 
make more than 40 business start- 
up decisions by attending "The Road 
to Business Success," an entrepre- 
neurial training program offered by 
the College of Lake County's Small 
Business Development Center. 

The 12-week program includes 
five workshops covering a step-by- 
step business planning process. A 
free bonus session providing tips on 
coordinating and using the plan is 
also included. The sessions will be of- 
fered from 6:30 to 10 p.m. on Thurs- 
days beginning March 2 in Room 
C003. Students may attend the whole 
program or specific workshops. 

The workshops will be offered at 
the Grayslake Campus as follows: 

March 2& 9 - Getting Started: Are 
you ready for entrepreneurship? ($60) 

March 16 &23 - Business Plan- 
ning: Your roadmap to success ($60) 

March 30 - Steps to Small Busi- 
ness Start-up ($30) 

April 6, 13, 20 & 27 - Market 
Planning and Implementation 
($120) 

May 4 & 1 1 - Basic Record-keep- 
ing and Accounting for Small Busi- 
ness ($60) 

May 18 - Putting it all Together, 
a bonus session for those who enroll 
for 10 or 12 weeks. 

Students may attend all 12 ses- 
sions for $280 or 10 sessions for $255. 
To register call 543-2033 of fax 223- 
9371. Master Card, Visa, Discover 
and American Express are accepted. 



Windows 2000 
preview set 

To help small and mid-sized 
manufactures get up to speed, the 
Chicago Manufacturing Center 
(CMC) is presenting a half-day con- 
ference, Technology Forum for Man- 
ufacturers, on March 1, from 9 a.m. 
to noon at Microsoft's office in 
Downers Grove, at 3025 Highland 
Parkway, Suite 300. 

Attendees will get an early look at 
Microsoft 2000 and participate in 
sessions on how technology can 
meet the changing needs of their 
businesses. For information or to 
register, contact Mike Cloud at (630) 
832-0075 x214 or Reagan Centeno at 
(773) 265-2025. 




Giving credit 

Great Lakes Credit Union employee Terry Clampit donates blood with the help of phlebotomlst Tra- 
cy Long during a blood drive in North Chicago.— Photo by Kirsten N, Hough 

CDW-G awarded Treasury deal 

Purchase agreement provides 
for Hewlett-Packard purchases 



CDW-Government Inc. (CDW- 
G) announced that the Department 
of Treasury has awarded the compa- 
ny a blanket purchase agreement for 
the purchase of Hewlett-Packard 
products. 

Under the terms of the BPA, all 
Treasury bureaus will be able to pur- 
chase HP products such as note- 
books, desktops, servers, printers, 
external storage devices and acces- 
sories. The BPA, which was awarded 
in January after a two-week bid 
process, is a one-year contract with 
renewal options through January 
2004. 

According to Daniel McLaugh- 
lin, contracting officer, chief de- 
partmental systems branch, IRS 
procurement, the Department of 
Treasury was looking for an alter- 
native to the limited focus of most 
resellers. 



"CDW-G's strong Internet-pres- 
ence combined with their excellent 
reputation in customer service are 
the factors that contributed to the 
Department of Treasury BPA win in 
such a highly competitive environ- 
ment," said McLaughlin. 

"The Department of Treasury 
has been a valued customer," stated 
Larry Kirsch, senior vice president, 
CDW-G. "This BPA strengthens our 
relationship and gives CDW-G the 
opportunity to further service all of 
the Treasury bureaus with technolo- 
gy solutions." 

As a part of the BPA, all Depart- 
ment of Treasury bureaus will have 
access to a variety of services of- 
fered by CDW-G, including person- 
al account managers and the com- 
pany's signature customized ex- 
tranet program, CDWG@work. The 
Department of Treasury's 



CDWG@work site will provide the 
agency and its all bureaus with a se- 
cure, e-commerce site that allows 
personnel to track both telephone 
and online purchases, verify ship- 
ping status, and access order histo- 
ry. In addition, custom reporting is 
available at varying levels. 

"Our goal is to help the Depart- 
ment of Treasury streamline the pur- 
chasing functions, offer savings in 
both time and money, and provide 
up-to-the-minute product and ac- 
count information," said. Kirsch. 
"Using this BPA, all of the bureaus 
will have access to custom config- 
ured solutions and lifetime, toll-free 
technical support." 

A wholly-owned subsidiary of 
CDW Computer Centers Inc., CDW- 
G was formed in September 1998 to 
address the unique needs of cus- 
tomers in the government and edu- 
cation markets. CDW-G combines 
advanced technology and personal- 
ized service to provide government 
and education customers with direct 
computing solutions. 



Computer Country Expo set for fairgrounds 



Lake County's largest com- 
puter show will be held on Feb. 
26 from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the 
Lake County Fairgrounds Exhib- 
it Hall, Rtes. 45 and 120, 
Grayslake. 

Open to the public, admission 



is $6 (kids under 12, free) with free 
parking. 

A virtual carnival for comput- 
er users with live enhanced enter- 
tainment, wild animals, and an 
hourly raffle. Free magazines. 
There will be 80 vendors from 



across the Midwest, with A-plus 
certified technicians on site to an- 
swer questions and help you with 
installations and problems. 
For further information call 662- 
0811 or visit the website at 
www.ccxpo.com 



; 



> 






C7 /Lakeland Newspapers 




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BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



February 25, 2000 



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BUSINESS DIGEST 

Realty office moves 

Podolsky Northstar Reality Partners, LLC. has announced its new loca- 
tion in Saunders Woods Corporate Center, 302 Saunders Rd., Suite 300, River- 
woods. 

Gift shop opens 

R & S Enterprises is a new business selling gifts for all occasions. We have 
jewelry, kitchen and garden decor, perfume, cologne, collectable plates, 
porcelain and glass items, clocks and much more. We have a new website at 
http://www.giftsbyrs.com. We also offer mail order. Call 269-4133 for a free 
catalog or wite to R & S Enterprises, 18152 W. Elm St., Wildwood, IL 60030. 

Roofer designated Master Contractor 

Firestone Building Products, Carmel, Ind., has named Metal/Roofmaster of 
McHenry, a recipient of the 2000 Master Contractor Award in recognition of the 
company's commitment to providing consistent, quality commercial roofing 
system installations, Metalmaster/Roofmaster was one of only 256 Firestone- 
licensed roofing contractors to be honored as a 2000 Master Contractor. 

Crane' has most affected by marriage penalty 

Congressman Phillip M. Crane, Vice-Chairmen of the Ways & Means 
Committee, said that a new study ranks the 8th Congressional District as the 
district with the most married couples affected by the federal marriage tax 
penalty in Illinois. The study, by The Heritage Foundation, shows that 70,832 
married couples in the 8th Congressional District suffer a marriage penalty 
tax, where each couple is expected to pay $1,400 more in federal taxes than 
unmarried people. 70,832 married couples are in the 8th Congressional (Con- 
gressman Philip Crane) and a total of 65,845 couples in the 10th Congressional 
District (Congressman John Edward Porter). 

Accidental Auto earns ValueStar certification 

Accidental Auto Body of Waukegan has attained the highly coveted Val- 
ueStar Certificatioin, reflecting an exceptionally high level of customer satis- 
faction. The firm was put through an extensive, 25 hour long satisfaction au- 
dit by the Public Research Institue of San Francisco State Universtiy. A ran- 
dom list of the firm's customers were asked to measure performance within 
the last 12 months. In addition, records were examined for complaints, prop- 
er licensing and adequate insurance. Accidental passed each phase of the cus- 
tomer service audit with exceptional performance. 

Country Companies receive award 

Country Companies received the National Association of Agricultural Ed- 
ucators (NAAE) Outstanding Cooperation Award for their work in agricultur- 
al safety education. 

The Country Companies insurance group advocates farm safety by de- 
veloping and presenting agricultural safety programs and demonstrations. 

Throughout the year, Country Companies safety education specialists 
conduct discussions on topics such as grain drowning, electrical safety, fire 
safety, and other related subjects. 



ON THE MOVE 

Chad W. Gruzalski of 
Antioch and Gregg K. 
Nagl of Algonquin have 
been named agents for the 
Country Companies insur- 
ance group. Gruzalski and 
Nagl share an office at 70 S. 
Route 45, Suite 210, Gruzalski 

Grayslake. Duane Jones 
and Scott J. StanJch have been 
named associate managers of the 
Country Companies Lake Agency 
in Grayslake. 

Five new members joined the 
Lake Cook Chapter of Women in 
Management, bringing the total 
membership to 28. Lake Cook 
WIM, which was launched in April, 
added new members Debbie Bell 
of NRBS/KZS Insurance in Rolling 
Meadows; Sue Bennett of Hen- 
dricksen the Care of Trees in 
Wheeling; Susan Glatt, senior 
sales director for Mary Kay Cos- 
metics in Buffalo Grove; Carol 
Marshall of the village of Lin- 
colnshire; and Betty Nlssen, vice 
president at Andrews Employment 
in Waukegan. 

To become a member of the 
Lake Cook Chapter of WIM, call 
855-4768. 




Dr. Patrick Morris, of Wright 
Chiropractic in Gurnee, has been 
appointed to the Lake County 
Workforce Development Board. 
The Board is being organized to 
help design a community-wide 
workforce system, assist in reform- 
ing workforce services for employ- 
ers and job seekers, and aid in 
making an efficient and customer 
focused system. 

Five accountants with the ac- 
counting firm of Friedman, Gold- 
berg, Mintz & Kallergis have re- 
ceived promotions as follows; 
Denlse Benesch was promoted 



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from Manager to Partner, as 
was Michael Donato . 
David Imler was promoted 
from Supervisor to Manager, 
as were Michael Obrochta 
and Scott Riser; Anna Nails 
has been promoted from ac- 
counting staff member to su- 
pervisor. 



Jones 



Stanich 




Dr. George Sweeting 

has retired as Chancellor. of 
Moody Bible Institute He now 
serves in the distinguished posi- 
tion of Chancellor Emeritus. 
Sweeting is the only alumnus to 
serve as president and chancellor 
in Moody's 114 year history. He 
served as president for 16 years 
(1971-1987) followed by 12 years as 
Chancellor. Sweeting resides in 
Antioch with his wife Margaret 
Hildegard Sweeting. 

Kathryn McFarland has 

been named divisional vice presi- 
dent, research and development in 
the chemical and agricultural 
products division of Abbott Labo- 
ratories. 

John M. Lerch of Vernon Hills 
has been appointed a full-time 
agent for American Family Insur- 
ance in the Vemon Hills area. 
Lerch opened an office at Metro 
Square One, 10 Phillip Rd. 

Outboard Marine Corporation 
has named Jim Pekarek Vice 
President and Controller. Jim Fer- 
rero has been appointed Director 
of Strategic Accounts for the North. 
American Engine Operations '. 

Rusty Tweedy has been 
named Director of Operations for 
OMCs parts and accessories divi- 
sion. OMC also announced that 
Bernhard Hadeler has been ap- 
pointed Vice President of Supply 
Chain Management for the North 
American Engine Operations. 

Libertyville resident Mark W. 
Schmidt has been appointed 
President and Chief Operating Of- 
ficer, CoreSource, atTrustmark In- 



Sweeting 



McFarland 



surance Company. 



As Waukegan Savings and 
Loan SB continues to grow, so has 
its management team and staff. 
Theodore J. (Ted) Stanulls, 
President of the Waukegan thrift, 
announced two promotions and 
the addition of three new employ- 
ees . Steven Gust was promoted 
to Controller while Therese 
Hotze took over the internal au- 
diting responsibilities at the bank. 

There are also three new mem- 
bers of Waukegan Savings and 
Loan's family. These include 
tellers Jennifer Gornlk and Raul 
Ochoa of Waukegan and the 
bank's new receptionist, Kenosha 
resident Lisa Amendola. 



David B. Rltter, of River- 
woods, a partner and chairman of 
the labor and employment prac- 
tice group at the Chicago law firm 
of Altheimer & Gray, is the author 
of an article in the January issue of 
the Illinois Bar Journal, the 
monthly magazine of the Illinois 
State Bar Association. 

Also iff the January issue, 
Mark D. DeBofsky, of Highland 
Park, an attorney at the Chicago 
law firm of DeBofsky & DeBofsky, 
is the author of two articles, 
"Bringing an ERISA Claim: A Step- 
by-Step Guide" and "Hot ERISA 
Topics." 

Kevin J. Therlault, Albany 
District vice president of opera- 
tions for Deerfield-basedAlliant 
Foodservice Inc., has been pro- 
moted to market president. 



Lincolnshire firm 
wins national award 



101 Corporate Woods Parkway, 
built by Van Vlissingen and Compa- 
ny, Lincolnshire, has won a 2000 
Award of Excellence in the Building 
Willi Trees Recognition program. 

The program, created in 1998 by 
The National Arbor Day Foundation 
in cooperation with the National As- 
sociation of Home Builders, recog 1 
jnizes builders and developers who 
save trees during construction and 
land development. 

101 Corporate Woods Parkway 
earned its recognition in the cate- 
gory of nonresidential commercial 
developments. Robert L. Peron 
spearheaded the project, and 
Chuck Stewart of Urban Forest 
Management, Fox River Grove, 



served as tree expert. 

Tree's were preserved or trans- 
planted whenever possible in the 
construction of this two-story, 60,000 
square foot office building and its ac- 
companying 40,000 square foot 
warehouse. Parking for 175 cars was 
also provided on this 11 -acre site, 
which is wooded with many hard- 
wood trees. 

More information on the Build- 
ing With Trees Recognition Program 
is available from The National Arbor 
Day Foundation, 100 Arbor Avenue, 
Nebraska City, NE 68410, tel. 402- 
474-5655. The Arbor Day Foundation 
is a nonprofit education organization 
dedicated to tree planting and envi- 
ronmental stewardship. 



FROM PAGE C6 



TAYLOR 



that these reactions are too harsh. 
Please remember, these aren't my 
ideas, they are the thoughts of 
good, viable customers. You'd be 
wise to find out how your cus- 
tomers feel and give them what 



they really want. 

Don Taylor is the co-author of 
Up Against the Wal-Marts. You may 
write to him in care of Minding 
Your Own Business, PO Box 67, 
Amarillo.TX 78105 



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C8/ Lakeland Newspapers 



BUSINESS 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS:' Get It 

Togelherl 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Organizing 
Services (or Home & Office 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1356 
Somerset Ave., Deerfield, IL 60015, 
(847)236-0811. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE AODRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Cynlhia S. Johnson, 1356 Somerset 
Ave., Deerfield, IL 60015, (847) 236- 
0811. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real lull 
name(s) of Ihe person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
tsi Cynthia S. Johnson, January 31 , 
2000 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by Ihe per- 
son(s) intending to conduct Ihe busi- 
ness this 31st day of January, 2000. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
Is/ Ivette M. Diaz 
Notary Public 
Received: January 31 , 2000 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake Counly Clerk 
0200B-3149-LB 
February 11,2000 
February 18, 2000 
February 25, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Metal Magic 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Automotive 
Detail & Spot Repair 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 36485 
Westmoor, Lake Villa, IL 60046 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Michael W. Arnos, 36461 N. 
Hawthorne, Ingleside, IL 60041 , (847) 
587-7166. 

James C. Henriksen, 36485 
Westmoor, Lake Villa, IL 60046, (847) 



546-2253. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 

COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
inlend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
narne(s) of Ihe person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Is! Michael W. Arnos, February 1, 
2000 

/s/ James C. Henriksen, February 1, 
2000 

The foregoing Inslrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 1st day of February, 2000. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
Is/ Barbara Erskin 
Notary Public 
Received: February 1, 2000 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake Counly Clerk 
0200B-3145-LV 
February 1 1 , 2000 
February 1 8, 2000 
February 25, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Laser 

AssthGtics 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Minor cosmetic 
surgery performed with laser on injec- 
tions 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 185 
Milwaukee, Suite 220, Lincolnshire 
60069, (847) 821-9400. (physical) 
Eric Meyer, 4 Leeds Ct., Lake Forest, 
IL 60045 (847) 821-9400. (mailing) 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Eric T. Meyer, 4 Leeds CI., 
Lincolnshire, IL 60045 (847) 234- 
7896. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) lo conduct Ihe above 
named business from the localion(s) 
indicated and that Ihe true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Eric T. Meyer, February, 8, 2000 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) intending lo conduct the busi- 



ness this 8th day of February, 2000. 

Received: February 9, 2000 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0200C-3163-LB 

February 18, 2000 

February 25, 2000 

March 3, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
THAT ON MARCH 13TH OF 2000. A 
SALE WILL BE HELD AT MIKE'S 
TOWING, INC. 908 N. RAND RD, 
WAUCONDA, IL 60084, TO SELL 
THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE(S) TO 
ENFORCE A LIEN EXISTING 
UNDER THE LAWS OF THE STATE 
OF ILLINOIS AGAINST SUCH ARTI- 
CLE^) FOR LABOR, SERVICES, 
SKILL OR MATERIAL EXPENDED 
UPON STORAGE FURNISHED FOR 
SUCH ARTICLE(s) AT THE 
REQUEST OF THE FOLLOWING 
DESIGNATED PERSON(S), UNLESS 
SUCH ARTICLE(S) ARE REDEEMED 
WITHIN THIRTY (30) DAYS OF THE 
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. 
JASON BENJAMIN/GARDEN 
CORNER 

1988 FORD F350 SUPER DUTY 
STAKEBED VIN#2FDLF47M4JCA32 
063 IL. L06293F 
THE AMOUNT OF LIEN IS $2739.76 
AS OF MARCH 13, 2000 
AS PUBLISHED IN THE LAKELAND 
NEWSPAPER. 

0200B-3151-WL 
February 11,2000 
February 18, 2000 
February 25, 2000 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: r-Camations 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Computer 
Sales, Repair, Networking, Computer 
Animations & Web Design 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 33423 Mill 
Rd, Witdwood, IL 60030, (847) 548- 
7366. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Jim R. Schrader, 33423 Mill Rd., 
Wildwood, IL 60030, (847) 548-7366. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certily that the undersigned 



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Since: 1969; A: %\2 H.; Loans: $924 mil. 706-449-8700 



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Colour rale (no 0(847-956-1 800 lor ntter-ftour quotes. 
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GMAC MORTGAGE CORP. 



Since 1940; A $100 bil.; Loans: $94 bil. 

LOAN DH390NS N MNLTTES . . . From a tontta vou can tust 
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Since: 1972; A: $215 mfl. 600-287-1709 

30/1HDA 8300 B.35B 0/0 $350 5% 

30/lix 8 375 8,450 0/0 $300 5% 

3/1/arm 7.750 8.718 LVO $300 5% 

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HARRIS BANK- 



Since: 1882; A: $20 9 W.: Loons: $4 ,5 bl. BBS-HUBERT-I 
7/23/tix 7.625 8.400 2/0 $300 10% 

7/23/lix 7.B75 8.430 1/0 $300 10% 

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Since, 1959; A: $200 mil. 

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Since. 1970; A $75 M.; Loans: $40 bB. 647-519-3633 

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Since: 1 970; A $ 1 5.6 bil.; Loans: $92.9 bil. 8 OO-i 1 0-2869 
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SmtStf Oo*n ptymanli miy nquin pmila rmrlgtat Iniuiinoa, «tich ml pin APR 




February 25, 2000 



inlend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from (he locatlonfs) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Jim R. Schrader, January 31, 2000 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) Intending lo conduct the busi- 
ness this 31st day of January, 2000. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
Is! Barbara Erskin 
Notary Public 
Received: January 31, 2000 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0200B-3147-GL 
February 11,2000 
February 18,2000 
February 25, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Curiosity Shop 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Resale 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1431 Goll 
Rd, Waukegan, IL 60087, (847) 625- 
8870. 

1338 Hickory, Waukegan, IL 60085, 
(847) 623-8624. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Robert J. Loper, 1338 Hickory, 
Waukegan, IL, 623-8624. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certily that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct Ihe above named 
business from Ihe location(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real lull 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Robert J. Loper 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness Ihls 26th day of January, 2000. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/si Barbara Erskin, Notary Public 
Received: January 26, 2000 
Willard R, Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0200B-3146-GP 
February 11,2000 
February 18,2000 
February 25, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Thumbs Up 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Cleaning 

Service 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 57 
Washinglon Blvd., 1 10, Mundeleln, IL 
60060, (847) 989-8985 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: . 
Tllna Murro, 57 Washington Blvd., 
110, Mundelein IL 60060, (847) 989- , 
8985. 

Kulli Lavrentjeva, 57. Washington 
Blvd., 110, Mundelein, IL 60060. (847) 
302-6051 . 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is' to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locatlon(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true and legal full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Is/ Tiina Murro 
/s/ Kulli Lavrentjenva 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 17th day of February, 2000. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/ Barbara Erskin 
Notary Public 
ReceivediFebruary 17, 2000 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0200D-3180-GL 
February 25, 2000 
March 3, 2000 
March 10, 2000 



Please Send Community 
Calendar Information To: 

LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 

c/o CALENDARS 

30 S. WHITNEY ST. 

GRAYSLAKE, IL 60030 

Phone 245-7500 

or e-mail: 

calendar@lpnews.com 



MEYERS 

ON MORTGAGES 

by Gary S. Meyers 



MORE ON FIRST TIME 
HOMEBUYERS 




TIiis Meyers Report continues its 
interview with Adriana Camaclx), 
branch manager of Commonwealih 
United Mortgage's Little Village 
branch in Chicago. Many of 
Camaclio's customers are Hispanic 
and she is experienced in dealing 
with home buyers for whom 
English is not tlrcir first language. 

Q, How do first lime home 
owners know how much they 
can afford? 

A. There are many ways. We 
ask them to bring in the last 
two years W2 forms, as well as 
their last few pay stubs. If they 
are self employed or commis- 
sioned, we need to see their tax 
returns for the last couple of 
years. Then, we ask for permis- 
sion to pull a credit report. In 
our community, many do not 
have a credit history, but there 
may be other problems. If there 
is any confusion or problems, 
the loan officer can help the 
borrower clear them up before 
taking the loan application. 

Q. How does the borrower 
know how much money is needed 
for the down payment, closing 
and other costs? 

A. The lender is required to 
supply a complete list of all 
costs involved. Down pay- 
ments vary. Usually the home 
buyer needs at least money for 



closing costs, title insurance, 
and appraisers fees. I also rec- 
ommend that the buyer have a 
home inspection done, which 
runs about $300, but it is well 
worth the money. 

Q. What is the difference 
between the appraiser who looks 
at the house for the lender and 
the house inspector? 

A. All the appraiser tells us 
is if the house is worth the 
money. If there is an obvious 
problem, then the appraiser will 
note that. A home inspector will 
take a closer look at everything. 
People commonly default on 
their loans, because something 
major goes wrong after they 
move into the house. The fami- 
ly is hit with all these bills. 

Q, In wlidt other ways can a 
lender help a new homeowner, 
especially one for whom English 
is not a first language? 

A. I try lo establish a contin- 
uing relationship with my cus- 
tomers. Most have experience 
as tenants, but they don't know 
what are their responsibilities 
as home owners. We offer 
some material, including some 
disclosures, printed in Spanish. 
I think lack of communication 
causes the most problems, so it 
is important that both sides 
understand each other. 



Reader questions may appear in this coliutm wfm c-nui'ded to Gary Meyers at: 
mrcport@aol.com or snail mailed to 450 Skokie Blvd, Suite 400, Nortlibtvok, IL6006Z 









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LAKE .-EO REST, 
HOSPITAL 

Diabetes Alert Day 
Screenings 

Early detection is critical for 

Ereventing or limiting serious 
ealth complications of this dis- 
ease. Take a few minutes to find 
out if you are at risk. Compli- 
mentary written diabetes risk 
test will be available in the lob- 
by with an optional blood test 
offered for $5. Held HFI. Open 
to members and non-members. 
Date: Wednesday, March 22. 
Time: 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

CPR: Save A Life 

Learn infant, child and adult 
CPR through the American 
Heart Association Pediatric and 
Heartsaver course. Participants 
receive first aid instruction for 
choking, as well as information 
about heart disease, causes and 
prevention of injury, and car- 
diopulmonary arrest in chil- 
dren. One-day class fee is $20. 
Call 535-6112. Date: Saturday, 
March 11. Time: 9 a.m." to 2 ' 
p.m. 

VICTORY 
MEMORIAL 
HOSPITAL 

Free blood pressure 
screenings 

From 8 a.m.-noon on Mon- 
day, February 28, "Free blood 
pressure screenings" will be giv- 
en at Victory Lakes Continuing 
Care Center, 1055 East Grand 
Avenue, Lindenhurst. No ap- 
pointment is necessary. Call 
356-5900 for more information. 

Dual Disorders Anonymous 

At 7 p.m. on Monday, Febru- 
ary 28, Dual Disorders Anony- 
mous" meets at Victory Memor- 
ial Hospital, 1324 North Sheri- 
dan Road, Waukegan. This free 
support jjroup offers help to 
people diagnosed with both 
mental health and chemical de- 
pendency problems. For infor- 
mation, call 360-4073. 

Issues of Aging: How to 
have a successful doctor's 
visit" 

At 7 p.m., Monday, February 
28, "Issues of Aging: How to 
have a successful doctor's visit!" 
will be presented by the Victory 
Community,ElderCARE Pro- 
gram. "Issues of Aging" will be 
held at the Gurnee Community 
Church, 4555 Grand Avenue, 
Gurnee. To register call 360- 
4004. 



PROVENA SAINT 
THERESE MEDICAL 
CENTER 

Prepared childbirth class 
for teens 

Pregnant teens and support 
persons learn about giving birth 
in an environment with other 
pregnant teens. Cost is $10 (par- 
ticipants must be in school). 
Five-day session, Thursdays: 
March 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30 from 7 
to 9 p.m. For information and 
registration, call Lenora Bonn, 
RN, certified childbirth and lac- 
tation educator, at 360-2281. 

Welcome baby home: 
Daddy basics 

March 28 from 7 to 9 p.m. at 
Provena Saint Therese Medical 
Center. Helps dads become 
more familiar with their role, 
from the last stages of pregnan- 
cy up to 4-month-old infant 
care. Cost is $10. For informa- 
tion and registration, call Leno- 
ra Bonn, RN, certified childbirth 
and lactation educator, at 360- 
2281. 

CONDELL MEDICAL 
CENTER 

Aero Dance 

On Monday, Feb. 28-8:30 a.m. 
Winter Into Spring, the next ses- 
sion of Aero Dance, the eight- 
week dance-Fitness class con- 
ducted by Condell Medical Cen- 
ter's Centre Club, will begin. 
Centre Club, 200 W. Golf Rd. ( 
Libertyville. 362-2905, ext. 5742. 




■ - 



February 25, 2000 



Lakeland Newspapers / C9 




gym convenience secret to staying 




It's easy to be committed to 
losing weight and getting in shape 
while you're looking at swimsuits 
for a tropical vacation. But it's an- 
other' matter entirely when you 
have to make the time for a health 
club. Getting fit maybe easier when 
you plan to do it at home. 

Although Americans continue 
to be interested in fitness, longer 
workdays and stressful lifestyles are 
making it harder for most people to' 
make a commitment to a health 
club or fitness facility. 

Even with advances in time 
management technology, Ameri- 
cans continue to make excuses for 
not getting exercise. People are 
committing their time to work and 
other obligations, rather than exer- 
cising — all of which leads to a fat- 
ter America. 

The American Heart Associa- 
tion reports that 104 million Ameri- 
cans are overweight and 42.5 mil- 
lion Americans are obese. And it's 
getting worse. The World Health . 
Organization and the International 
Obesity Task Force have declared 
obesity a global epidemic. 

But for over a decade, Bowflex, 
a leading manufacturer of home fit- 
ness equipment, has attempted to 
turn the tide against obesity with its 
home gym, the Bowflex Power Pro. 
This home gym is a solution be- 
cause it combines a number of fea- 
tures to counter all those excuses 
that are easy to make. 

"It's one of the most exciting 
machines in today's market," says 
Randy Potter, vice president of mar-- 
, keting. "Nowhere else will you be 
able to find a machine that com- 
bines everything you need with the 
adaptability you want at a price you 
can afford." 

Turning to home gyms is smart 
because they give the benefits of ex- 
ercise, including reduced stress and 
overall better health, without the 
complications that go along with a 
health club membership. This is es- 
pecially true witli two-income or 



single-parent families. A home gym 
enables everyone to make and keep 
a plan for getting more exercise. As 
Americans turn to home gyms, 
they're becoming more sophisticat- 
ed, choosing gyms with multiple 
functions and longer usability pro- 
viding a health club-quality work- 
out. In as little as 20 minutes a day 
and as few as three days a week, 
users can see the results. 

Here are the most common 
concerns and solutions from the 
home gym experts at Bowflex: 

1. Finding 20 minutes: To bal- 
ance work, family and personal 
lives, Americans are increasingly 
turning to home gyms to gain the 
benefits of exercise. Research shows 
that 20 minutes of exercise 3 times a 
week can make a difference. Find- 
ing those 20 minutes is the reason 
most fitness programs fail. Finding 
20 minutes at home is easy if you 
know where to look. Some of the 
best places are the: 

•20 minutes waiting for dinner 
to cook. 

•20 minutes waiting for your 
teens to get out of the bathroom. 

• 20 minutes watching the 
morning or evening news. 

• 20 minutes by not having to 
drive to a health club, find a parking 
spot, and waiting for equipment or 
classes to be open, 

• 20 minutes looking for some- 
thing to wear that still fits and is not 
too tight 

2. Variety of exercise. Doing the 
same thing for even a short period 
of time becomes boring and begins 
to eat away at motivaUon. 

Bowflex builds more than 60 ex- 
ercise options into its gymi ranging 
from the bench press to chest fly to 
squats. The Power Pro also inte- 
grates the ability to include aerobic 
exercise into your routine. The 
built-in aerobic rowing feature, a 
hard-to-find feature on most 
strength training machines, adds 
true circuit training functionality 
for anyone who is trying to trim 



Lake County Board of 
Health elects officers 



The Lake County Board of 
Health has elected Timothy Wells, 
the Village Administrator of Antioch, 
as the new president of the Lake 
County Board of Health. The Board 
also elected Lucille DeVaux, R.N., 
N.H.A. of Long Grove as Secretary, 
and Glouscester A. Price, M.D. of 
Waukegan as Member-at-Large for 
2000. John Schulien, D.D.S. of Liber- 
tyville is continuing his two-year 
term as Vice President 

Wells has served on the Board of 
Health for seven years. He has a long 
liistory of public service. Prior to 
serving as Antioch's Village Adminis- 
trator, he served as the village's Pub- 
lic Works Administrator from 1983 to 
19B8 and as Foreman and Chief Op- 
erator for Antioch's water and sani- 
tary sewer treatment plant from 
1976 to 1983. 

"I'm excited about the upcom- 
ing year," he said. "We have a strong 
and diverse Board of Health and the 
most competent staff around, I'm 
looking fonvard to working together 
toward our goal of making human 
services for citizens the best and 
most efficient as we can." 

He replaces outgoing president 
Colin McRae of Ingleside, who 
served on the Board of Health for 
nine years, and as president for four. 
"I've never been more proud of my 
association with a public service or- 
ganization Uian with my association 
witli the Health Department," said 



McRae, who will continue to serve as 
a Board of Health member. 

Dr. Schulein, who has served on 
the Board of Health for seven years, 
also serves on the County Board as a 
Representative from District 13 
(which includes Libertyville and 
Green Oaks) and is one of two Coun- 
ty Board members on the Board of 
Health. He maintains a private den- 
tal practice in North Chicago, and 
has been a resident of Lake County 
since 1972, having moved to Liber- 
tyville after serving three years in the 
United States Army Dental Corps. 
Dr. Schulien is also active with a 
number of civic organizations, in- 
cluding the Easter Seal Society, 
where he is a national director and 
secretary of the national board, and 
the North Chicago and Libertyville 
Rotary Clubs. He served on the 
health advisory committee of the 
Lake County Head Start, is a direc- 
tor of the Lake County Navy 
League, and has served on the Col- 
lege of Lake County's advisory 
committee. 

All members of the 12-member 
Board of Health volunteer their time. 
They are responsible for overseeing 
programs and developing policies 
for the Lake County Health Depart- 
ment and Community Health Cen- 
ter to promote physical and emo- 
tional health, prevent disease, injury 
and disability, and protect the envi- 
ronment. 




Home gyms come in many styles, shapes and sizes. Convenience 
is the plus for all of them. 



down the notorious hard-to-target 
areas or build stamina. 

3. Quick results: Seeing results 
is important to maintain motiva- 
tion. The Bowflex Fast Fat Loss 
Program has given proven results in 

as little as six weeks. Developed by - 

fitness expert, author and re- 
searcher Ellington Darden, this 
body leanness program is easy to 
stay with and gets results fast! Addi-* 
tional Bowflex exercise programs 
can be customized to fit users' spe- 
cific needs. 

4. Versatility; With a standard 
210 pounds of resistance, an ad- 
justable hand grip /ankle cuff 
and an adjustable seat/ bench, 
the basic Bowflex Power Pro is a 
complete gym. Additional equip- 
ment can be added to upgrade 
the model including a leg exten- 
sion/leg curl attachment, lat 



pulldown tower, chest bar, squat 
attachment, foot harness and a 
T-bar for enhanced rowing per- 
formance. Additional resistance 
can be added in 100-pound in-, 
crements, up to as much as 410 

-total pounds. This creates a gym- 
that will grow as its users build 
strength and gain muscle tone. 

5. Easy to store: Bowflex con- 
veniently folds up and rolls any- 
where in your house for storage. 
There's no need to dedicate an 
entire room to fitness anymore 
for those who are space-chal- 
lenged. 

6. Affordable: A Bowflex usually 
costs less than an annual health 
club membership for two. Plus it 
eliminates the hidden expenses of 
childcare, gas and parking — and 
convenient financing plans are 
available. 



Videotape addresses children's 
concerns about stuttering 



Stuttering is a frustrating and 
embarrassing problem for millions 
of people, but it can be especially 
tough on elementary school-age' ' 
stutterers. 

Now some new help is available 
for parents, teachers and speech- 
language paUiologists at the Fre- 
mont Public Library in Mundelein 
in the form of a videotape designed 
specifically to help school-age chil- 
dren who stutter. 

"It's meant to give speech-lan- 
guage pathologists the tools they 
need to deal with stuttering in this 
age group, but it also offers good 
ideas for parents and teachers," 
said Professor Peter Ramig of the 
University of Colorado at Boulder. 
Ramig is one of five nationally rec- 
ognized experts appearing in the 
video produced by the nonprofit 
Stuttering Foundation of America. 

The video features students 
from first through sixth grade, 
some of whom talk about their ex- 
periences with stuttering. They talk 
openly about the teasing they face 
• from classmates and how their stut- 
tering sometimes makes them feel 
about themselves. 

"We focus on demonstrating a 
variety of therapy strategies that are 
appropriate in working with chil- 



dren who stutter," adds Ramig. He 
appears in the video along with 
speech-language pathologists Barry 
Guitar, Ph.D., of the University of 
Vermont, Hugo H. Gregory, Ph.D., 
and June Campbell, MA, of North- 
western University and Patricia Ze- 
browski, Ph.D., of the University of 
Iowa. 

These five experts answer ques- 
tions about stuttering, refute myths 
and misconceptions, and present 
examples of therapy sessions show- 
ing how stuttering can be reduced. 

"More than three million Amer- 
icans stutter, yet stuttering remains 
misunderstood by most people," 
said Jane Fraser, president of the 
Stuttering Foundation. "Myths such 
as believing people who stutter are 
less intelligent or suffer from psy- 
chological problems still persist de- 
spite research refuting these erro- 
neous beliefs." 

The 38-minute video, entitled 
Therapy in Action: The School-age 
Child Who Stutters, is being distrib- 
uted free of charge to public li- 
braries nationwide. For more infor- 
mation about obtaining your own 
copy, contact the Stuttering Foun- 
dation of America, P.O. Box 11749, 
Memphis, TN 3811 1-0749, or call 
toll free at 1-800-992-9392. 









C10/ Lakeland Newspapers 



HEALTHWATCH 



February 25, 2000 



> 

► 

> 

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Behavior problems at epidemic 




Tliis will be part of a several week se- 
ries on what causes bad behavior to 
be in such large proportions. 
Hi Dr. Singer, 

I call today because I am very 
disillusioned. We are trying to find 
a private school for our child. He Is 
in public school now and frankly, 
we are sick and tired of the lack of 
punishment for bad behavior that 
exists. 

Each day, we hear about an- 
other child in the classroom who is 
out of control and taking time 
away from our child's education. 
We are told that the troubled cliild 
is being worked with, but my ob- 
servations of how faculty are work- 
ing with this child as well as other 




PARENT'S 
PLACE 

Dr. Sherri Singer 



kids is really not anything that will 
stop the bad behavior. It makes it 
worse. I refer to talking about the 
behavior instead of punishing It. 
My disillusionment lies in the 
fact that, after observing and 
specking with many private 
schools in the suburban area and 
we are finding that the same level 
of behavior problems seems to ex- 



ist there, too. 

When we were growing up, we 
behaved because we didn't want to 
sec what happened if we didn't be- 
have. Back then we learned and 
worked In school. 

I'd like your opinion on what 
has gone wrong and why people 
are so blinded to what to do to 
change this back. I'd also like to 
know if you know of any private 
schools that might be more old 
fashioned when It comes to pun- 
ishing bad behavior? We thank 
you! 

B.B. 

DearB.B., 

1 know what you are experienc- 



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ing because I see it, hear it and ex- 
perience it on a daily basis. The 
good news is, for the parents who 
wake up and smell the coffee early 
enough, and change the behavior 
the minute it happens, their kids 
will be OK. It's still not fair at all for 
the kids who have to have their ed- 
ucational time used up watching 
the very unsuccessful classroom 
dance of wooing bad behavior. I will 
speak in the next couple columns 
about all the things that I believe 
are going wrong, but I will first say 
.that 1 agree with you that years ago, 
we did not do these things and that 
misbehavior was in no way as wide- 
spread and intense as it is today. 

Regarding your search for 
schools, I wish you luck, but cannot 
endorse any schools simply be- 
cause I am not familiar enough with 
any one place to do that. I do be- 
lieve though, that you should keep 
searching because I know that there 
are others out there who believe as I 
do and can control behavior prob- 
lems. I wish you luck in the search. 
If you don't find anyplace, I would 
suggest you check into home 
schooling your child and supple- 
menting social interaction some- 
where else. 

Here are some reasons why I 
believe we have the problems we 
have today and I will also say that if 
we don't change things soon or 
now, our kids are in big trouble. 
Please understand before you read 
further that when I speak of punish- 



ment, I do not refer to abusive puh : 
ishment. I just mean appropriate 
punishment that means something 
to the child and effects the child. 

Disrespect When a child was 
disrespectful decades ago, there 
would be disdain on the part of the 
adult and usually punishment 
would follow. The child realized 
that he or she was not more impor- 
tant or more in control of things 
than the adult. Today, when a child 
is disrespectful, most adults I have 
seen would first try to calm the 
child and then talk about the child's 
feelings, putting the child on the 
same level with the adult and legit- 
imizing the behavior. They might 
also throw a ball back and forth 
while talking. I believe this is a dis- 
ease outgrowth of the 1960's. Cod : 
dling before respect and responsi- 
bility. Our kids cannot possibly 
learn respect for themselves or their 
fellow man if when they are down- 
right rude or disrespectful, some- 
one coddles and talks to them and 
acts as though the nasty behavior 
never occurred or worse yet, excus- 
es the nasty behavior based on any 
excuse. 

You see, adults and parents put 
up with the garbage that comes out 
of a child's mouth based on wanti- 
ng to build self-esteem. So, adults 
listen and talk and play and soothe 
the behavior away. The problem is 
that the same behavior, because it 

Please see SINGER iCU 



It's best to eat to 
live, not live to eat 



5 

By LUIS I. SALAZAR 

and WILLIAM A. MARTINEZ 

Molicre, the author and play- 
wright once wrote, "One must eat 
to live and not live to eat." Eating 
right. It's everywhere we look. Good 
Housekeeping and Reader's Digest, 
Cosmopolitan and Sports Illustrat- 
ed. The business of eating right and 
what to cat is a multimillion-dollar 
industry in this country. Our nation 
has the luxury of being able to pay 
not to eat. This is evidenced by fad 
diets, and weight loss regimens that 
continue to sell year after year. 

Multiple contributing factors 
such as heredity play a part in obe- 
sity. Social factors like eating when 
lonely or sad or stressed may figure. 
Recreation maybe another cause. 
You and your friends may go out to 
eat or for a drink. We are sometimes 
pressured to have that extra help- 
ing. Sometimes we'll take medica- 
tion that may contribute to our ap- 
petite. Some of us deal with hor- 
monal issues. A sedentary lifestyle is 
a large contributing factor as well. 
Prosperity has gone a long way to 
give us compact cars and laptop 
computers making our own laps 
less compact. 

As a practicing physician, I am 
continually reminded during office 
visits of the number of us who are 
less than happy with our physical 
appearance. It's ironic that we have 
more avenues that advise and di- 
rect us on how to cat right and how 
to eat moderately, but have the 
greatest epidemic of obesity as a 
nation. Estimates of obesity in 
America run as high as 25 percent 
and run higher in minorities. I try to 
find ways to help by offering advice 
and direction for each unique situa- 
tion. Something between the quick- 
fix phen-phen pill and stomach sta- 
pling. I've found as a professional 
that for the vast majority of patients 
addressing the basics remains the 
best advice. Basics aren't usually 
quick and dramatic but are safer, 
more effective, and less expensive. 
They outperform advertising tactics 



in the long run. 

Before the New Year and with 
the approaching holidays we'll be 
tempted and tantalized by all sorts 
of foods to overindulge in. So how 
does one lose weight? How does 
one keep it off? Identifying what.has 
contributed to being overweight in 
the first place and finding new ways 
to deal with those is most useful. 
Finding new ways to deal with your 
stress, new ways to feel less lonely, 
or talking with a counselor about 
how you're feeling is extremely 
helpful. 

If we are stressed, the experts 
still say that we should let ourselves 
experience how we are feeling with- 
out resorting to overeating, Il's not 
the emotions that cause the weight 
gain, but the response to them. 
Once you discover that eating does- 
n't really make you feel better, it be- 
comes easier to not respond to 
stress by eating. 

Meals that are low in fat are key. 
It is also helpful to start meals with 
something light like soup Having a 
vegetable, grain and protein at each 
meal, eating slowly and only until 
you feel satisfied, are all vital mea- 
sures to addressing obesity. Avoid- 
ing high fat foods and stocking your 
desk and home cupboard with low 
fat snacks is effective. Writing down 
your plan and taking notes on your 
progress may help you. 

Finally, making exercise a habit 
can change it from being a chore to 
making it a pleasant task. Choose 
exercises that you enjoy or can do 
with a friend and can continue 
throughout your life. A regular eat- 
ing pattern and exercise program is 
the basis for long-term success. 
Don't wait to prepare for the rest of 
your life! 

Doctors Luis I. Salazar and 
William A. Martinez are bilingual 
practicing family physicians at 
Provida Health Center, Condell 
Medical Building 1170 £ Belvidere 
Rd. Suite 105, Grayslake IL 60030. 
For an appointment or more 
information phone 847-548-2200. 



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February 25, 2000 



HEALTHWATCH 



Lakeland Newspapers /.C1 1 



FROM PAGE Al 



SINGER 



was reinforced by adults, follows 
the child to school etc. and little 
kids do not have any interest in . 
talking or feeling or understanding 
or coddling. When we allow a child 
to be disrespectful to anyone, with- 
out punishment, we are setting him 
up to fail in the outside world be- 
cause no one naturally accepts be- 
ing spoken to or treated that way. 
No one should! 

Denial. Unfortunately, from 
my observations, most human be- 
ings would rather hope something 
bad will go away rather than going 
on the offensive and making it go 
away. Many people live in great de- 
nial of problems until they become 
so huge that they cannot be ignored 
or denied anymore. The unfortu- 
nate thing is that by the time they 
are recognized, they can be in crisis 
proportions. 

The scariest part about denial is 
that people can think they are actu- 
ally doing something about the 
problem, when in reality, their steps 
are not enough, until it becomes a 
"day late a dollar short." I believe 
that this occurs with child behavior 
problems on a daily basis. Most of 
the people I see, have had their kids 



kicked out of something or have 
had their kids get into terrible trou- 
ble that there is no easy way out of. 
Unfortunately, they have waited 
until the problem became much 
bigger than it started to be. Denial 
can cause us to do the wrong thing 
over and over, thus reinforcing the 
bad stuff. I would much prefer to 
see a child's behavior problem get 
handled from the moment the first 
sign of it happens than wait until 
the problem is so entrenched that it 
becomes permanent. Permanence 
of these kinds of behaviors can ruin 
a child chances for success. Some- 
times, there isn't another chance. 

Be sure to read next week's col- 
umn for more information on the 
epidemic of behavior problems. 

Dr. Sherri Singer is a Licensed 
Clinical Psychologist and Childhood 
.Behavior Specialist. She regularly 
works in person with many readers 
of this column. She is the author of, 
"Wliy Kids Misbehave" and "Raising 
Kids Wiw Don't Become Your Worst 
Nightmare." For an appointment or 
to purcliase either of Dr. Singer's 
books, please call (847) 577-8832 or 
(708)962-2549. 



More dentists urge patients 
to quit tobacco smoking 



Roughly six out to 10 dentists 
urge their patients to stop smoking 
or using smokeless tobacco prod- 
ucts, according to the American 
Dental Association's recently re- 
leased 1997 Survey of Current Is- 
sues in Dentistry: Tobacco Use Ces- 
sation. 

Approximately 3,000 ADA 
members as well as non-members 
were asked how often they person- 
ally advise patients who are smok- 
ers or use smokeless tobacco to 
quit. More than 58 percent of den- 
tists urged smokers to quit the 
habit, representing a 10 percent in- 
crease over the comparable 1994 
survey. In addition, more than 60 
percent of the survey respondents 
advised patients to quit using 
smokeless tobacco. 

However, if the dentist is fe- 
male, patients are more likely to be 
advised to quit smoking or to stop 
using smokeless tobacco, according 
to the survey. Nearly 48 percent of 
the female dentists routinely urged 
their patients to quit smoking com- 
pared to approximately 39 percent 
of male dentists. Almost 55 percent 
of female dentists routinely urged 
their patients to stop using smoke- 
less tobacco compared with 45 per- 
cent of male dentists. 

"Smoking cigarettes and cigars 
and chewing tobacco are habits 
that have major implications for the 
oral cavity," says Keith Suchy, DDS, 
a general dentist who practices in 
Westchester, IL "One reason you 
don't see many dentists smoking is 
because we know the implications 
of smoking." He cites the following 
studies. 

•Two recent studies conducted 



at Tufts University, Boston, found 
that smokers are about two times 
more likely to lose their teeth than 
non-smokers. 

•A 1995 study published in a 
1995 issue of The Journal of the 
American Dental Association found 
that major league baseball players 
who use smokeless tobacco do not 
hit, pitch or field the ball any better 
than players who abstain from 
smokeless. 

•A recent study in The Journal 
of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry found 
that exposing a child to tobacco 
smoke can delay the development 
of the child's permanent teeth by 
an average of four months. 

•A 1997 study conducted at 
SUNY-Buffalo found that smokers 
do not heal as well as non-smokers 
or former smokers following peri- 
odontal treatment. 

"Many dentists are becoming 
more aggressive in warning their 
patients about the dangers of smok- 
ing and many are getting involved 
in smoking cessation programs," 
says Dr. Suchy. 

The American Dental Associa- 
tion and its component and con- 
stituent societies developed an anti- 
tobacco stance in 1964 in conjunc- 
tion with the U.S. Surgeon Gener- 
al's report on the health hazards of 
tobacco use. In recent years, the 
ADA repeatedly has spoken against 
the use of tobacco and has asked 
the federal government for regula- 
tions, including calling nicotine an 
addictive drug and supporting leg- 
islation to restrict its use. Most re- 
cently, the ADA worked for the pas- 
sage of the Smokeless Tobacco 
Warning label Act. 



Centre Club to host certification 
program and workshop 



Condcll Medical Center's Cen- 
tre Club will host two Aerobics and 
Fitness Association of America 
(AFAA) events for group exercise in- 
structors on March 1 1 and 12. 

At 9 a.m. on Saturday, March 
1 1 , AFAA will conduct a primary 
certification review, culminating in 
the practical and written exams. 
The review will cover AFAA's Basic 
Exercise Standards and Guidelines, 
anatomy, exercise science, exercise 
evaluation and exam criteria. 

At 8 a.m. on Sunday, March 12, 
AFAA will conduct a workshop on 



how to design a progressive muscle 
conditioning class, add variety to 
basic exercises and focus on inno- 
vation and safety. 

All of Centre Club's group exer- 
cise instructors must be certified 
within a year of their hire. The 
club's staff is dedicated to continu- 
ing education to provide the best 
programs for its members. 

Centre Club is located on Con- 
dell's Libertyville campus at 200 W. 
Golf Rd. For information, call AFAA 
at 1-800-9-TEAM PRO or Centre 
Club at 816-6100, ext. 5742. 



Eight area Routes planned for MS walk April 9 



The Mercedes-Benz 2000 MS 
Walk!" will be held in eight north- 
em Illinois communities on Sun- 
day, April 9. Goals of 12,000 walkers 
and proceeds of $2 million nave 
been set for the pledge-based event 
organized by the Greater Illinois 
Chapter of the National Multiple 
Sclerosis Society. 

The local routes, which will be 
among 700 sites across the country, 
include the 7-mile Chicago Lake- 
front route beginning at Avery Field 
at 10th SL and Columbus Dr.; Fox 
Valley beginning at Pottawatomie 
Park, St. Charles; Joliet/ Lockport at 
Dellwood Park; McHenry County in 
Crystal Lake; Naperville's River- 
walk; North Shore/Highlarid Park at 
Wolters Field; Northwest Suburban 
in Busse Woods Forest Preserve, Elk 
Grove Village/Schaumburg; and 
South Suburban at Oak Forest's 
Yankee Woods Forest Preserve. 

Since its inception, the MS 
WALK has generated more than 
$250 million nationally. The Great 
Illinois Chapter, the participating 



walkers and volunteers distin- 
guished themselves last year by 
raising more than $1.7 million, the 
highest return of any in the Nation- 
al MS Society's 50-state network. 

Walkers will seek pledges from 
sponsors in support of their effort 
as they follow routes varying from 7 
to 9 miles. Participants may walk on 
their own or as part of teams made 
up of families, friends or coworkers. 
Check-in time at each WALK site is 
between 8 and 9:30 a.m. with the 
official kickoff ceremonies at each 
route planned for 9 a.m. 

The walkers will receive snacks 
and beverages at rest stops along 
the route. Prizes will be awarded ac- 
cording to funds raised beginning 
with an official T-shirt at the $169 
level and a WALK sweatshirt at 
$300. From $500 to $7,500, walkers 
will receive graduating values of 
Lettuce Entertain You certificates, 
with many other prizes available. 
The grand prize will be tickets for 
two to anywhere in the continental 
U.S., courtesy of American Airlines. 



Mercedes-Benz is the title, 
sponsor of the 2000 MS WALK Ad- 
ditional major sponsors are: Jewel- . 
Osco, Mercedes-Benz, American 
Airlines, ABC-7 Chicago; 101.9 THE 
MIX; Lifetime Television for 
Women and Pride Healthcare. 

Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, 
often disabling disease of the cen- 
tral nervous system that generally 
strikes people between the ages of 
20 and 40. Symptoms can range 
from numbness in the limbs.to 
paralysis or loss of vision. The 
progress, severity, and specific 
symptoms of MS in any one person 
cannot yet be predicted, but ad- 
vances in research and treatments 
are giving hope to those affected by 
the disease. 

Potential walkers are invited to 
call the MS chapter at 312-423-1179 
for more information on registra- 
tion, route details, how to seek 
sponsors, form teams or take part 
as a volunteer. You may also visit 
the chapter web site at www.msilli- 
- nois.org. 




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OBITUARIES 



012/ Lakeland Newspapers 



February 25, 2000 



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BARBARISE 

Alexander A. Barbarise, age 61 of Vernon 

Hills 

Arr: McMurrough Chapel, Libertyville 

BRZEZINSKI 

Leo Brzezinski, age 81 of Libertyville 
An: Kristan Funeral Home PC, Mundelein 



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Eugene A. Kampert, age 75 of Barrington 
Arr: Davenport Family Funeral Home, 
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Donald F. Brown, age 70 of Wauconda 
Arr: Kisselburg-Wauconda Funeral Home, 
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Ruby H. Busse, age 78 of Mundelein 

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Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Funeral Directory 



CONNOR-MCVAY 
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Crossings Plaza 

300 N. Milwaukee Ave., 

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Mike Connor & Steve McVay, 

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IIISTEN'S ROUND LAKE 
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222 N. Rosedale Court 
(Rosed ale at Cedar Lake Road) 

(847) 546-3300 

Nancy Justen & Mark Justen, 

Directors 

Additional Locations in 

McHenry and Wonder Lake 

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Hamsher Glen, Directors 



RINGA 
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Villa, IL 

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Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 

SPRING GROVE 
FUNERAL CHAPEL 

8103 Wilmot Rd., PO. Box 65, 

Spring Grove, IL 60081 

(815) 675-0550 or Toll Free 

(888) 394-8744 

Kurk P. Paleka, Director 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 

(847) 395-4000 
Dan Dugenske, Director 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL 
AND CREMATORIUM, LTD. 

410 E. Belvidere Grayslake, IL 

(847) 223-8122 

David G. Strang and Richard 

A Gaddis, Director 



Addie f . Mateja 

Born Nov. 18, 1925. Died at St. Anthony's Hospital, 
Rockford on Feb. 20, 2000. 

Survived by one son, John Mateja of Cicero; three 
grandsons, Joseph DeCaro, Michael DeCaro, and John 
Mateja, Jr.; two grand daughters, Donna Lee DeCaro, Leah 
DeCaro and six great grandchildren Joseph, Joseph, Michael, 
Nicole, Samantha, Keith all from Wisconsin. 

In loving memory 

Jesse E. Talkington 

Age 69, passed away on Sunday, Feb. 13, 2000 at 
Highland Park Hospital, Highland Park. He was a resident of 
Florida for 40 years where he was the owner of Pro Line 
Automotive. He was also a member of the Elk's Lodge and the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles in Florida. Most recently he lived in 
Round Lake and attended Quentin Road Bible Baptist 
Church, Lake Zurich. Jesse was a devoted husband, father, 
and grandfather. 

HeleaveshiswifeJoannewhomhewedonOct. 14, 1960; 
daughter, Cathi Ann (Don) Volante; son, Michael Edward 
Talkington; and grand daughter, Victoria Ann Volante. He is 
preceded in death by his mother, Lilly Talkington and broth- 
er, Carl Hutchison. 

A Memorial Service was held at Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium , Grayslake. 

Interment was private. 

Elaine Lois Roeco 

Age 79 of Madison, Wis., formerly of Grayslake passed 
awayTuesday, Feb. 15, 2000 at the University ofWisconsin in 
Madison, Wis. She was born Oct. 10, 1923 in Marshall, Mich., 
the child of Ross (Irene) Kihl. Mrs. Rocco worked many years 
in the Mental Healdi field at Waukegan Developmental facil- 
ity. 

She leaves her children, Bruce (Vicki) Rocco of 
Middleton, Wis. and Dale Rocco of Little Rock, Ark., and four 
grandchildren. She is preceded in death by her husband, 
Clarence E. Rocco. 

Funeral Services were held at Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake with the Pastor Robert 
Mciselwitz of the St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church of 
Round Like Park officiating. 

Interment followed at the Highland Memorial Park 
Cemetery in Libertyville. 

Ida Viktoria Lundstrom 

Age 96, passed away on Saturday, Feb. 12, 2000 at Victory 
Memorial Hospital, Waukegan. 

She leaves her grandsons, Leo (Tammy) Lowy and Scott 
Lowy of Arizona; grand daughter, Lizbcth Lowy ofWisconsin; 
great grand daughter, Samantha Jean Lowy; and niece, 
Marion Sicplinga of Michigan. She is preceded in death by 
her husband, Bror Ivan Lundstrom; daughter, Nancy Louise 
Lundstrom; father, Per Erik Pearsson; mother, Birgetta Sofia 
Pearsson; sisters, Selma, Hannah, Edith, Alma, Ingeborg, 
Hulda and Ellen; brothers, Richard, Gustaf, Victor and Eric. 

A Memorial Service was held at the Strang Funeral 
Chapel and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake with Rev. Lisle J. 
Kauffman of Calvary Presbyterian Church, Round Lake offi- . 
dating. 

Interment was private. 

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Make- 
a-Wish Foundation, 640 N. LaSalle, Suite 280, Chicago, IL 
60610. 

Elizabeth Rogers 

Age 23 days old, of Round Lake Park, died Wednesday, 
Feb. 16, 2000 at Condell Medical Center in Libertyville. She 
was born Jan. 24, 2000 in LibertyvUJe to Jeffrey MatUiew and 
Maria Guadalupe (Ahumada) Rogers. 

Survivors include her parents; a sister, Alicia Marie 
Rogers of Round Lake Park; three aunts, Cristina (Jesse) 
Reyna of Palatine, Minerva Ahumada of Round Lake Park, 
and Vlkki (Robert) Rogers of Mundelein; an uncle, David 
(Cristina) Rogers of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.; paternal grandpar- 
ents, Robert (Barbara) Rogers of Lake Forest, and Linda 
Guenther of Gainesville, Fla.; and maternal grandparents, 
Lucinda (Jesus) Ahumada of Round Lake Park. 

Visitation of family and friends was at Justen's Round 
Lake Funeral Home, 

The Funeral Blessing was held at Highland Memorial 
Chapel with Rev. Francisco Cuevas officiating. 

Interment was at Highland Memorial Park Cemetery, 
Libertyville. 

Janie R. Jorgensen 

Age 38 of Antioch, passed away Friday, Feb. 18, 2000 at 
Victory Memorial Hospital, Waukegan. She was born Oct. 24, 
1961 in Ontario, Canada moving to Antioch in I960. She was 
a member of the Women of the Moose Chapter 735 in 
Antioch. 

Survivors include her parents, Richard and Betty 
Jorgensen of Antioch; her dear friend, Tory Simonsen of 
Antioch; two brothers, Grant and Edward Jorgensen, both of 
Antioch; four sisters, Velma Jorgensen of Antioch, Nancy 
(Steve) Otis of Trevor, Wis., Gail Woodruff of Atwater, Calif, 
and Tammy Muck or Kansas; two step-brothers, Ricky 
(Sandy) Jorgensen in Florida and Randy Miller of Nevada; 
two step-sisters, Leta (John) Wick of Undenhurst and Judy 
(Mike) Patterson of Antioch, and many nieces and nephews. 

Funeral Services were held at the Strang Funeral Home 
of Antioch. 

Interment was private. 

Those desiring may make contributions to the Cystic 
Fibrosis Foundation or the Antioch Rescue Squad in her 



memory. 

Bernice Lyons 

Age 74, passed away Feb. 1 8, 2000 in Midland, Tex., at the 
home of her son. The youngest of 1 1 children, Bernice was 
born June 1 , 1925 and resided in Grayslake for over 40 years 
before moving to Midland, Tex. in 1999. While in Grayslake, 
Bernice was a member of St. Gilberts Church, 

She is survived by her husband, John Lyons of Grayslake; 
her sons, John (Irene) Lyons Jr. of Midland, Mich., Ted - 
(Sharon) Lyons of Palatine, and Tim (Pat) Lyons of Midland, 
Tex.; her grandchildren, Jason, Brian, Elizabeth, Patrick, 
Nicholas, and Sam; her brothers and sisters, and many 
nieces, nephews and loving friends. 

There was a memorial visitation at Strang Funeral 
Chapel and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake. 

Funeral Services and interment was private. 

Mary E. Andersson 

Age 53 of Round Lake Park, died Friday, Feb. 18, 2000 at 
Condell Medical Center in Libertyville. She was born Feb. 6, 
1947 in Chicago to Robert and Viola M. (Kouch) Goeltz. A res- 
ident of Round Lake Park since 1990, Mary had formerly 
resided in the Chicago area. She was employed as an assem- 
bler for Motorola in Harvard and was formerly employed at 
the Volo Village Furniture and Antique Shops. She was an 
avid gardener, and especially enjoyed tending to her lilac 
bushes. She adored her cats, Charlie, Mouse, Cera, Josie and 
Sadie. 

Survivors include two sisters, Carol Hoffman of Inglcside 
and Jane (Francis) Stetson of Aurora, Colo.; a brother, Bob 
(Gcri) Goeltz, Jr. of St. Charles, Mo.; two nieces, Emily Stetson 
and Tanya Goeltz; and a nephew, Willie Goeltz. She is pre- 
ceded in death by her parents. 

A Funeral Blessing was held at the Justen's Round Lake 
Funeral Home with Rev. Robert Fitzpatrick officiating. 

Interment was private. 

Russell Fairchild 

Age 89 of Antioch, passed away Sunday, Feb. 20, 2000 at 
the Pebble Brook Nursing and Rehab Centre, 1-ako Bluff. He 
was bom Oct. 14, 1910 in Chicago, the son of the late, Bert 
and Nancy (Dunfcc) Fairchild. Russ had worked for the 
Railroad Express at Union Station in Chicago as a clerk for 33 
years. He moved to Antioch in 1972 and was a member ofSt. 
Peter Church; die AARP and Senior Citizens and Loyal Order 
of Moose Lodge 525. During the Christmas Holidays lie 
wrote a column for the Antioch News, called a stroll with 
Russ Fairchild, which was appreciated by many people. On 
July 21, 1961 he married Ginger Blazek in Chicago aiui she- 
preceded him in deadi on July 19, I98S. Russ will be remem- 
bered by many friends. 

Funeral Services with Mass of Christian Burial was held 
at St. Peter Church, Antioch. 

Friends and family visited at the Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch. 

Private interment was held at Elmlawn Cemetery, 
Elmhurst. 

Those desiring may make contributions to the Antioch 
Rescue Squad or St. Peter Church in his memory. 

Russell J. Shaak 

Age 73 of Gages Lake," passed away on Sunday, Feb. 20, 
2000 at Provena/St.Thercsc Medical Center in Waukegan. He 
was bom in Schaefferstown, Penn. on Nov. 26, 1926, the son 
of the late Samuel and Savannah Shaak. He was a veteran or 
World War II, serving with the U.S. Army as a paratrooper. He 
was a member of the Libertyville American Legion Post. He 
was retired after 23 years of service with the American Family 
Insurance Company. 

He is survived by his wife, Elcanore.They were united in 
marriage on Nov. 7, 1948; his daughter, Audrey Breede of 
Lindenhurst; grandchildren, Thomas Breede and Melinda 
Cody; great grandchildren, Anthony and Ryan. Also surviving 
is his sister, Dorothy Boyer and brother, Harold (Elva) Shaak. 

Funeral Services were at the Ringa Funeral Home, Lake 
Villa with Rev. Lisle J. Kauffman officiating. 

Interment was at Millburn Cemetery, Old Mill Creek. 

Winifred C. Rasmussen 

Age 80 of Antioch, passed away Thursday, Feb. 17, 2000 
at her home. She was bom April, 1919 moving to Antioch in 
1985. Winnie was a retired beautician, loved to play bingo 
and was a member of the Antioch Senior Center and AARR 

Survivors include her daughter, Barbara (John) King of 
Bloomfield Hills, Mich.; one brodier, Oliver 'Bud' Carroll of 
Medford, Wis.; nine grandchildren and 14 great grandchil- 
dren. She is preceded in death by one brother and four sis- 
ters. 

Funeral Services were held at the Strang Funeral Home 
of Antioch. 

Interment was at Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. 

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Ladies 
of Charity of Oakland County, Mich, 

Robert V. Hubka 

Age 75 of Lake Villa, died Feb. 21, 2000. Veteran ofWWII. 
He was a retired electrician from Local 134 and 150. 

Beloved husband of Barbara (Kasper) Hubka, father of 
Pamela, Robert (Dianna) and Andrea. Loving grandfather of 
Gina, Michael, Angelo, Amber and Robert. A friend to many. 

Arrangements were private. 

In lieu of flowers, the family asks that a donation be 
made to The Leukemia Research Foundation. 

Continued on next page 






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February 25, 2000 



OBITUARIES/LEGAL NOTICES 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C 1 3 *» 



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Continued from previous page 

Arrangements were entrusted to 
Connpr-McVay Cremation and Funeral 
Care, Lake Villa. 

John E. Horak 

Age 72 of Spring Grove, passed away 
Wednesday, Feb. 16, 2000. He was bom 
Sept. 2, 1927 in Cicero, the son of the late 
Martin and Albie Horak., His family 
moved to Ivanhoe, when he was a young 
boy where his family farmed. They 
moved to Mundelein where John began 
to haul waste for people. After serving in 
the U.S. Army during the Korean War he 
helped found HOD Disposal," which he 
later owned, selling it to Waste 
Management in 1972. John worked for 
Waste Management until his retirement 
in 1 985. At that time he began the Wilmot 
Buffalo Farm in Wilmot, Wis., which he 
operated until his death. On Oct 28, 
1962 he married Pauline (nee Pike) 
Ciecholinski in Woodstock. 

Survivors include his wife, Pauline; 
four children, Rev. Thomas (Mary) 
Maniaci of Cincinnati, Ohio, Paulette 
(Jim) Porter of Sandusky, Ohio, Paula 
(David) Peterson ofWarrenville and Fran 
Pszenny of Antioch; four grandchildren, 
Carrie and Michael Maniaci, Rachel and 
William Peterson; two brothers, Robert 
Horak of Mount Prospect, and Elmer 
(Judy) Horak of Richmond; three sisters, 
Sylvia (James) Alkofer in New York, Rosie 
(Larry) Kick of Richmond and Marian 
Horak of Lake Zurich, and many nieces 
and nephews. In addition to his parents, 
he is preceded in death by his sister, 
Ellen Geffe. 

Funeral Services were held at the 
Strang Funeral Home of Antioch. 

Interment was private. 

Those desiring may make contribu- 
tions to the Food Pantry at Grant 
Township, 411 S. Washington St., 
Inglesidc, IL 60041 in his memory. 

Glen D. Mincks 

Age 75, a Johnsburg, Sunnyside area 
resident for the past 27 years, and former 
resident of Chicago, died on Wednesday, 
Feb. 16, 2000 at Northern Illinois Medical 
'Center in McHenry: He was born on Jan. 
2, 1925 in Levvistown, Mo. Mr. Mincks 
worked as a security man for several 
years before his retirement He was a vet- 
eran of WWII having served in the U.S. 
Army. 

He is survived by his wife, Nancy M. 
Hincks (nee Clark) with whom he was 
united in marriage on Feb. 9, 1960 in 
Chicago; by four sons, Glen D. Mincks Jr. 
of Mattson, Russel Mincks of Missouri, 
Timothy (Genia) Mincks of Round Lake 
and Victor (Lori) Mincks of Woodstock; 
by two daughters, Theresa (Michael) 
Gore of Inglcside and Karen (Jeffery) 
Schmidt of Wonder Lake; by six grand- 
sons, Joshua, Andrew, Jacob, Tyler, Dylan 
and Collin; by three grand daughters, 
Cam, Tanya and Tabiiha. He is preceded 
in death by brothers and sisters. 

Memorial Services were conducted 
at the K. JC Hamsher Funeral Home, Ltd., 
Fox Lake (The Chapel on the Lake) with 
Rev. Father Tony Longhi officiating. 

In lieu of flowers, the family will 
appreciate memorials for the American 
Heart Association. 

Susan B. Bar ack (nee Brown) 

Age 58, a resident of the Chain 
O'Lakes area since 1979, formerly of 
Dayton, Ohio, died Monday, Feb. 14, 
2000 at the Sherman Hospital in Elgin. 
She was born on Jan. 1 8, 1942 In Dayton, 
Ohio to John S. and Jean (nee Hughes) 
Brown. Mrs. Barack had been a self- 
employed business woman at Mill 
Stream Optical on Front St. in McHenry, 
as an optician, and had been a very 
active member of the Fox Lake Lioness 
Club, and die Waukegan Uptown Lions 
Club. She had served as past president, 
and as a director for both clubs, and was 
a member of several additional commit- 
tees as well. 

Survivors include, her husband, 
Alan Barack of McHenry; her son, Philip 
Tyson Barack of McHenry, her daughter, 
Marcy Elizabeth Barack of McHenry; her 
mother, Jean Brown Ode of Harlingen, 
Tex.; one brother, John H. (Donna) 
Brown of Dayton, Ohio; one sister, Ann 
Brown (Bill) Schwinn of Chesterfield, 
Mo.; her aunt, Priscilia Brown Tanner of 
Jacksonville, Fla.; her nieces and 
nephews, Kristin, Jessica, Alaina, 
Michelle of Dayton, Ohio, Amy, Susan 
and Marc of Rockford and by her In-laws, 



Max and Regina Barack of South Bend, 
Inc. She is preceded in death by her 
father, John S. Brown In 1979 and her 
grandmother, Marie B. Hughes. 

Religious Services and Lions Club 
Services were held at the K. K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home, Fox Lake (The Chapel on 
the Lake). 

Interment was private. 

Memorials for the Lions of Illinois 
Foundation, 2814 DeKalb St., Sycamore, 
IL, 60178, will be appreciated in lieu of 
flowers. 

Russel E. 'Russie' Ilorton 

Age 50 of Bristol, Wis. passed away 
Monday, Feb. 14, 2000 at Aurora 
Medical Center, Kenosha, Wis. He was 
born July 30, 1949 In Waukegan, the son 
of Russell C. and Amelia (Kasten) 
Horton and has been a lifelong resident 
of Bristol, Wis. He graduated from Hazel 
Deli Grade School in Bristol Township 
and Salem Central High School and 
served in the U.S. Army during the Viet 
Nam War. He was a member oftheNRA 
and was an avid hunter and trap shoot- 
er and supporter of Ducks Unlimited. 
For several years he has operated the 
HBO game farm. He also owned 
Percheron horses which he loved to ride 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Brooms N 

Things 

NATURE/PURPOSE; Handcrafts 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 995 Main, 
Antioch, IL 60002, (847) 395-6121. 
(physical) 

PO Box 331, Antioch, IL 60002, (847) 
395-6121. (mailing) 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Emerson R. Sander, PO Box 331, 
Antioch, IL 60002 (847) 395-6121. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This ts to certify that the under- 
signed Intend (s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
Indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) o( the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
/si Emerson R. Sander, February, 3, 
2000 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 3rd day of February, 2000. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
1st Frances Mary Marshall 
Notary Public 
Received: February 4, 2000 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0200C-316Q-AN 
February 18, 2000 
February 25, 2000 
March 3, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: RSA 

Distribution 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Wholesale dis- 
tributors of sunglasses, vitamins, & 
weight/on products 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 5115 Red 
Pine Ave., Gurnee, IL 60031, (847) 
762-9010. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Ronald Elmer Spaulding, 5115 Red 
Pine Ave., Gurnee, IL 60031, (B47) 
782-9010. 

Diana Amelia Spaulding, 5115 Red 
Pine Ave., Gurnee, IL 60031, (847) 
782-9010. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed inlend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the locations} 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Ronald Elmer Spaulding, 
February, 4, 2000 

1st Diana Amelia Spaulding, 
February, 4, 2000 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 4th day of February, 2000. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
1st Dana Kraph 
Notary Public 
Received: February 4, 2000 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0200C-3164-GP 
February 18, 2000 
February 25, 2000 
March 3, 2000 



and was a member of the-International 
Rodeo Association, participating in sev- 
eral rodeos. Mr. Horton worked as a 
truck driver for DK Contractors and had 
also been a farmer. On Aug. 4, 1995 he 
married Pamela Sue Kieffer in 
Waukegan. 

Survivors include his wife, Pam; one 
step-son, Michael (Jennifer) Welsh of 
Oshkosh, Wis. and one step-daughter, 
Jennifer (Rob) Woods of Waukegan; his 
mother, Aurelia Horton of Bristol, Wis.; 
one brother, LeRoy (Rosemary) Horton 
and one sister, Bonita (Thomas) Bobula 
both of Bristol, Wis.; one grand daughter, 
Abigail; his mother and father-in-law, 
Doug and Grace Kieffer of Patton, Penn.; 
brother-in-law, Rick (Joyce) Kieffer of 
Grayslake and sister-in-law, Patricia 
Horton of Bristol, Wis.; several nieces, 
nephews and many, many friends. He is 
preceded in death by his father, Russell 
on Nov. 30, 1996 and one brother, 
Donald on May 19, 1995. 

Funeral Services were held at Strang 
Funeral Home of Antioch. 

Interment was at South Bristol 
Cemetery, Bristol Township, Wis. 

Those desiring may make contribu- 
tions to the Bristol Township Rescue 
Squad in his memory. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS NAME 

ADDITION OF OWNER TO 

BUSINESS 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Vernal 

Equinox Investment 

Original Date Filed 6/20/96 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the person(s) 
listed below is/are to be added to the 
list of person(s) owning, conducting or 
transaction the above named busi- 
ness effective June 1, 1999. 
Laura J. Cordak, 2102 Cryslal Way, 
Crystal Lake, IL 60012, (815) 356- 
5103. 

1st Laura J. Cordak 
Lisa Cregller, 1115 Washington, 
Wauconda, IL 60084 (847) 487-1861. 
Isl Lisa Creglier 

Kristine L Geary, 811 Northshore Dr., 
Wauconda, IL 60084, (847) 526-7351. 
The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending lo conduct the busi- 
ness this 1st day of June, 1999. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Is/ Maureen Remsing 

Notary Public 

Received: February 10, 2000 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

02O0C-3168-WL 

February 18,2000 

February 25, 2000 

March 3, 2000 



. PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice Is hereby given that Shur- 
Lock Self Storage, Inc., 35865 N. 
Route 45, Lake Villa, IL 60046 will sell 
the personal goods from: 

Unit 16 Outside belonging to Frank 
Fuller. The goods consist of 1998 
Buick Wagon Century, License Plate tt 
CML401. 

Unit 18 Outside belonging to Frank 
Fuller. The goods conslsl 1986 Ford 
Mini Van, License Plate tt F73732. 

Unit 106 belonging to Frank Fuller 
The goods consist of numerous 
copiers and printers, computers, 
Apple Laptop computer, cat house, 
and a bird cage. 

Unit 54 belonging to Douglas 
Fullerton. The goods consist of water 
ski board, old wooden sled, saw hors- 
es, miscellaneous tools, and 1 folding 
chair. 

Unit 320 belonging to Joseph 
Hackett.The goods consist of three (3) 
canoes, white refrigerator, futon 
couch, toolboxes, hand truck, plastic 
container, water bottle, coins, and mis- 
cellaneous boxes. 

Unit 628 belonging to Marsha 
Robinson. The goods consist of old 
TV, white metal cabinet, dining room 
table, chairs, dresser, bicycle and mis- 
cellaneous boxes. 

Unit 739 belonging to James 
Bruebach. The goods consist of golf 
clubs and bag, one (1) amp, and mis- 
cellaneous bags. 

Unit 705 belonging to Richard K. 
Franklin. The goods consist of miscel- 
laneous plastic Rubbermaid tubs, an 
end table, wooden TV tray, miscella- 
neous decorative basket & flowers, 
and miscellaneous boxes. 

Sale will take place on the premis- 
es on Saturday, March 4, 2000, at 
approximately 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. 

We reserve the right to accept or 
reject all bids. 

Not responsible for accidents. 

ROGER BRODERS 

President 

35865 N. Rt. 45 

Lake Villa, 

IL 60046 

Telephone: (847) 223-2400 

0200D-3185-LV 

Februrary 25, 2000 

March 3, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: A Utile Bite of 
Heaven, Candy Creations and Gifts 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Retail Gift 
Baskets, Candy Arrangements, Gills 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 82 Elm 
Avenue, Fox Lake, IL 60020, (847) 
973-05B1. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Nancy K.Wagner, 82 Elm Avenue, Fox 
Lake, IL 60020. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
narhe(s) of theperson(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Nancy K. Wagner, January 24, 
2000 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 24th day of January, 2000. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/ Lynn Helma 

Notary Public 

Received: January 28, 2000 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0200B-3153-FL 

February 11, 2000 

February 18, 2000 

February 25, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME, OF BUSINESS: Field of 
Dreams Landscaping ' 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Brick Paving 
Landscaping, Lawn Maintenance 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 599 
Glenview Ave., Highland Park, IL 
60035, (847) 681-9460 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE . 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Nicola H. PresutL 599 Glenview Ave., 
Highland Park, IL 60035. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the under- 
signed inlend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the locatlon(s) 
indicated and that the due or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
/si Nicola P result, February 15, 2000 
The' foregoing instrument . was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 1 5lh day of February, 2000. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/si Adriana Lomeli 

Notary Public 

Received: February 15, 2000 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0200C-3177-LB 

February 18, 2000 

February 25, 2000 

March 3. 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
WARREN TOWNSHIP 
Notice is hereby given that sealed proposal will be received at the office of the 
Town Clerk, Warren Township at 17801 W.Washington Street, Gurnee, Illinois 60031 
until 10 a.m. on Wednesday March B, 2000 for furnishing of the following material: 
16,000 gallons premium no lead gasoline 
16,000 gallons #2 premium low sulfur diesel. 
Proposals shall be made on lorms furnished by the Township Highway 
Commissioner, and shall be addressed in a sealed envelope to: Warren Township 
Highway Department, c/o Margaret Keenan-Denniston, Town Clerk 17801 W. 
Washington street. Gurnee, Illinois 60031 and shall be marked "Material Proposal- 
Letting of March 8, 2000-Gas Warren Township." - 

Further information regarding Ihe letting may be obtained by contacting the 
Highway Commissioner at (847) 244-1101. The Township in accordance with the 
Laws of the State of Illinois hereby notified all bidders that it will affirmatively insure 
that the contract entered Into pursuant to this awarded to the lowest responsible bid- 
der without discrimination, on the ground of race, color or national origin. 

0200D-31B4-GP 
February 25, 2000 



. .-■' PUBLIC NOTICE .> 

PUBLISHER'S CERTIFICATE 
19919 
Account Number 

CONSOLIDATED REPORT OF CONDITION including domestic and foreign sub- 
sidiaries and foreign branches of Anchor Bank located In Lake Villa, Illinois at the 
close of business December 31, 1999. 

Published in Response to Call of the OFFICE OF BANKS AND REAL ESTATE of 
the State of Illinois. 

BALANCE SHEET 

1. Cash and balances due from depository institutions: 

a. Noninterest-bearing balances and currency and coin 3,433 

b. Interest-bearing balances ...;.... 717 

2. Securities: 

a. Held-to-maturity securities . -0- 

b. Availabte-for-sale securities 9,354 

3. Federal funds sold and securities purchased under agreements to 

resell — 430 

4. Loans and lease financing receivables: 

a. Loans and leases, net of unearned income 40,228 

b. LESS: Allowance for loan and lease losses 439 

c. LESS: Allocated transfer risk reserve 

d. Loans and leases, net of unearned Income, allowance 

and reserve (item 4, a minus 4.b and 4.c) 39,789 

5. Trading Assets . ■ ■ . ... 

6. Premises and fixed assets (including capitalized leases) 1 ,636 

7. Other real estate owned ■. . 

8. Investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries & associated companies . 

9. Customers' liability to this bank on acceptances outstanding 

10. Intangible assets 2,547 

11. Other assets 539. 

12. Total Assets (sum of items t through 11) 58,445 

LIABILITIES 

13. Deposits. 

a. In domestic offices 52,335 

(1) Noninterest-bearing 7.B14 

(2) Interest-bearing 44,521 

b. In foreign offices, Edge and Agreement Subsidiaries, and IBFs ... 

(1) Noninterest-bearing 

(2) Interest-bearing .0 

14. Federal funds purchased and securities sold under 

agreements to repurchase , 

15. a.. Demand notes issued to the U.S. Treasury 

b. Trading liabilities 

16. Other borrowed money (includes mortgage indebtedness 
and obligations undercapitalized leases); 

a. With remaining maturity of one year or less 

b. With remaining maturity of more than one year through 

three years 

c. With a remaining maturity of more than three years 

17. Not applicable 

18. Bank's liability on acceptances executed and outstanding 

19. Subordinated notes and debentures 

20. Other liabilities 385 

21. TOTAL LIABILITIES (sums of 13 through 20) 52,720 

22. Not applicable 

EQUITY CAPITAL 

23. Perpetual preferred stock and related surplus 

24. Common stock . . . , 300 

25. Surplus (exclude all surplus telaled to preferred stock) 10,296 

26. a. Undivided profits and capital reserves (309) 

b. Net unrealized holding gains (losses) on available-for-sale securities (482) 

27. Cumulative foreign cunency translation adjustments 

28. Total equity capital (sum of items 23 through 27) 5,725 

29. Total liabilities, equity capital, and losses deferred 

(sum of items 21 and 28) 58,445 

I, Dennis Hughes, Vice President, Cashier, of the above-named bank, do hereby 
certify that this report of condition is correct and complete to the best of my knowl- 
edge and belief. 

Correct - Attest Dennis Hughes 

0200D-3182-LV 

February 25, 2000 



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- C 1 4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



LEGAL NOTICES 



February 25, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

The following parcels of properly, acquired through Ihe Tax Sale Certificate 
Program, are being offered for sale by the County of Lake. 

Written bids should be submitted to the County of Lake, Tax Extension Dept., 
Room 101, 18 N. County St., Waukegan. IL 60085. 

Bids received will be retained for 30 days alter the Initial bid. After completion of 
the 30-day period, the County has the right to accept the highest bid or to reject it II 
the amount Is insufficient or If the sale would not be In the best Interest of Lake County 
Taxpayers. 

ANTIOCH NEWS REPORTER 



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UNINCORPORATED ANTIOCH 


60002 


26625 W. Cedar St. 


01-11-302-014 -. 


26691 W. Cedar St. 


01-11-302-017 


42444 N. Willow St. 


01-11-305-003 


42436 N. Willow St. 


01-11-305-004 


41966 N. Beach view Dr. 


01-14-203-022 


39955 N. Rena Avenue 


01-25-201-033 


25390 W. Hilldale Ave. 


01 -25-214.014 


27141 W. Fairview Ave. 


01-34-203-010 


27137 W. Falrview Ave. 


01-34-203-011 


271 27 W. Fairview Ave. 


01-34-203-014 


271 40 W.Park Ave. 


01-34-203-025 


27136 W.Park Ave. 


01-34-203-026 


27132 W.Park Ave. 


01-34-203-027 


271 28 W.Park Ave. 


01-34-203-028 


26688 W.Stongate Dr. 


01-35-103-018 


40287 N. Fox Run Ln. 


02-20-300-027 


22322 W.Virell Dr. 


02-21-401-033 


22086 W. Sarana Dr. 


02-21-405-023 


22080 W. Sarana Dr. 


02-21-405-024 


22072 W. Sarana Dr. 


02-21-405-025 


22066 W. Sarana Dr. 


02-21-405-026 


2205B W. Sarana Dr. 


02-21-405-027 


22046 W. Sarana Dr. 


02-21-405-028 


22032 W. Sarana Dr. 


02-21-405-029 


22135 W.Virell Dr. 


02-21-408-007 


22271 W. Loon Dr. 


02-21-409-015 


22277 W. Sarana Dr. 


02-21-409-016 


22257 W. Loon Dr. 


02-21-409-017 


22276 W. Lee Dr. 


02-21-409-031 


INCORPORATED OLD MILL CREEK 


60083 


39143 N. Mill Creek Rd. 


03-28-400-003 


WAUCONDA LEADER 




INCORPORATED ISLAND LAKE 


60042 


Eastway Dr. 


09-21-304-007 


3827 Elder Drive 


09-21-310017 


INCORPORATED WAUCONDA 


60084 


Anderson Road 


09-35-104-001 


UNINCORPORATED WAUCONDA 


60084 


26872 N. Huston 


09-33-101-010 


26880 N.Lake Ave. West 


09-33-101-017 


28531 W. Maple Ave. 


09-33-101-039 


26927 N. Kane Dr. 


09-33-103-006 


26926 N. Elm St. 


09-33-103-015 


2851 7 W. Maple Ave. 


09-33-112-002 


28474 W. Main St. 


09-33-203-013 


28462 W. Main St. 


09-33-203-014 


26941 N. Bern ice street 


09-33-205-001 


26913 N. Morey St. 


09-33-207-010 


26905 N. Morey St. 


09-33-207-011 


26834 N. Bernice SI. 


09-33-210-013 


26828 N. Bernice SI. 


09-33-210-014 


26814 N. Bernice St. 


09-33-210-015 


26827 N. Bernice St. 


09-33-211-006 


26852 N. Morey St. 


09-33-212-013 


26652 N. Brooks St. 


09-33-220-011 


UNICORPORATED MCHENRY 


60050 


28960 W.Valleyview Dr. 


09-04-101-024 


31 B97N. Hillside 


09-04-103-001 


FOX LAKE PRESS 




INCORPORATED FOX LAKE 


60020 


180 Howard Court 


05-03-102-026 


Eagle Point Rd. 


05-09-400-137 


S. Holly Ave. 


05-10-100-203 


38 Ridgeland Ave. 


05-10-307-012 


79 Maple Ave. 


05-10-410-015 


213 Mastodon Dr. 


05-11-304-008 


Whitten St. 


05-14-112-013 


639 S. Hwy 59 


05-15-202-061 


27521 W. Chris Larkin rd. 


05-15-400-027 


UNINCORPORATED FOX LAKE 


60020 


35549 N, Marine Dr. 


05-15-104-103 


UNINCORPORATED INGLESIDE 


60041 


35459 N. Everett Ave. 


05-13-300-011 


26450 W. Hudson Ave. 


05-14-201-024 


26319 W. Blackhawk Ave. 


05-14-213-014 


26307 W. Blackhawk Ave. 


05-14-213-015 


26301 W. Blackhawk Ave. 


05-14-213-018 


26295 W. Blackhawk Ave. 


05-14-213-017 


26279 W. Blackhawk Ave. 


05-14-213-019 


26277 W. Blackhawk Ave. 


05-14-213-020 


35576 N. Helendale Rd. 


05-14-215-014 


35522 N. Helendale Rd. 


05-14-215-041 


35516 N. Helendale Rd. 


05-14-215-044 


35512 N. Helendale Rd. 


05-14-215-046 


35212 N. Shoreline Dr. 


05-14-300-038 


35348 N. Ingleside Dr. 


05-14-312-001 


35330 N. Ingleside Dr. 


05-14-312-002 


35266 N. Ingleside Dr. 


05-14-312-010 


35184 N. Ingleside Dr, 


05-14-323-002 


27016 W. Longwood Dr. 


05-15-402-022 


27008 W. Longwood Dr. 


05-15-402-023 


34952 N. Leonard Dr. 


05-21-201-007 


34940 N. Leonard Dr. 


05-21-201-008 


34955 N. Gogol Ave. 


05-21-201-033 


FOX LAKE PRESS 




INCORPORATED SPRING GROVE 


60081 


27763 W. Ravine Dr. 


01-27-308-005 


38273 N. State Park Rd. 


01-33-308-007 


38269 N. State Park Rd. 


01-33-308-008 


3B183 N.NIppersink 


01-33-318-001 


38175 N. Nippersink St. 


01-33-318-002 


38169 N. Nippersink St. 


01-33-318-003 


38163 N. Nippersink St. 


01-33-318-004 


38153 N.NIppersink St. 


01-33-318-005 


3B141 N. Nippersink St. 


01-33-318-006 


38135 N. Nippersink St. 


01-33-318-007 


381 29 N, Nippersink St. 


01-33-318-008 


38123 N. Nippersink St. 


01-33-318-009 


38119 N. Nippersink St. 


01-33-318-010 


38184 N, Burton Ave. 


01-33-318-011 


UNINCORPORATED SPRING GROVE 


60081 


38176 N. Burton Ave. 


01-33-318-012 


38170 N. Burton Ave. 


01-33-318-013 


38164 N. Burton Ave. 


01-33-318-014 


38156 N. Burton Ave. 


01-33-318-015 


38144 N. Burton Ave. 


01-33-318-016 


38134 N. Burton Ave. 


01-33-318-017 


38128 N. Burton Ave. 


01-33-318-018 


38122 N. Burton Ave. 


01-33-318-019 


38116 N. Burton Ave. 


01-33-318-020 


38111 N.Channel Dr. 


01-33-323-002 


38029 N, Nippersink St. 


01-33-324-009 


38066 N. Burton Ave. 


01-33-324-014 


38058 N. Burton Ave. 


01-33-324-015 


28624 W. Kendall Ave. 


01-33-328-010 


28616 W.Kendall Ave. 


01-33-328-011 


27528 W. Greenwood Ave. ' 


01-34-120-013 


38343 N. Dawn Circle East 


01-34-310-012 


38366 N. 5lh Ave. 


01-34-314-012 


37990 N. Nippersink PI. 


05-04-101-001 


37986 N. Nippersink PI. 


05-04-101-002 


37980 N. Nippersink PI. 


05-04-101-003 



37976 N. Nippersink PI. 
37972 N. Nippersink PI. 
37968 N. Nippersink PI. 
37981 N. Nippersink PI. 

37977 N. Nippersink Pi. 
37971 N. Nippersink Pi. 
28911 W. Kendall Ave. 
28895 W. Kendall Ave. 
28977 W. Westland Ave. 
37854 N. Harold Ave. 
37834 N. Harold PI. 

"37806 N. Watts Ave. East 
37794 N. Watts Ave. East 
28670 W. Margie Place 

LAKE VILLA RECORD 
UNICORPORATED LAKE VILLA 
38150 N. Sunset Ln. 
23840 W. Washington Ave. 
38912 Hickory St. 
Hickory St. 
37393 N. Rivera Dr. 
36976 N.Terry Dr. West 
36963 N. Lawrence Dr. 
21881 W. Park Dr. 
21873 W.Park Dr. 
35248 N. Grant Ave. 
18881 W. Roosevelt Rd. 
INCORPORATED LINDENHURST 
2307 Federal Pkwy. 
748 Beck Road 
Grant Ave. 

GURNEE PRESS 
INCORPORATED GURNEE 
Pacific Avenue 
Pacilfc Avenue 
St. Paul Ave. 
Skokle Hwy. 
Skokle Hwy. 
Skokle Hwy. 

UNINCORPORATED GURNEE 
14830 W.Eastwood 

ROUND LAKE NEWS 
UNINCORPORATED ROUND LAKE 
Summit St. 

INCORPORATED ROUND LAKE BEACH 
1314 Oak Ave. 
527 Pheasant Court 
1 304 Ardmore Dr. 
1522 Barberry Lane 
1215 Beverly Dr. 
1213 Beverly Dr. 
1205 Beverly Dr. 
1 203 Beverly Dr. 
1203 Beverly Dr. 
1117 Beverly Dr. 
1115 Beverly Dr. 
1113 Beverly Dr. 
922 Fairfield Rd. 
1009MayfieldDr 
925 Maytield Dr. 
1105 Shady Lane Ct. 
925 Lotus Dr. 
1006 Idlewild Drive 
Bernice Court North 
925 Sunset Dr. 
Bernice Court North 
Bernice Court North 
Bernice Court North 
Bernice Court South 
Bernice Court South 
Park Road 

22792 W.Lake Park Ave. 
22976 W. Shorewood Dr. 
22959 W. Shorewood Dr. 
307 Greenwood Dr. 
Garden Court 
Bimlny Bay 
OBiminyBay 
Biminy Bay 
Bimlny Bay 

GRAYSLAKE TIMES 
INCORPORATED GRAYSLAKE 
Alleghany Road 

UNINCORPORATED GRAYSLAKE 
17750 W. Greentree Rd. 
Hwy 83 



05-04-101-004 
05-04-101-005 
05-04-101-006 
05-04-102-001 
05-04-102-002 
05-04-102-003 
05-04-102-007 
05-04-102-008 
05-04-110-012 
05-04-111-017 
05-04-111-019 
05-04-112-023 
05-04-112-024 
05-04-116-002 

60046 
01-38-400-015 
02-32-109-018 
02-34-104-007 
02-34-104-008 
06-02-406-005 
06-09-201-002 
06-10-104-003 
06-10-303-001 
06-10-303-002 
07-18-300-012 
07-18-302-029 

60046 
02-26-400-054 
02-26-400-055 
06-24-202-012 

60031 
07-13-219-005 
07-13-219-006 
07-23-203-004 
07-24-122-005 
07-24-122-006 
07-24-223-001 

07-26-300-007 

60073 
06-18-300-007 

60073 
06-16-325-032 
06-17-308-011 
06-17-432-013 
06-18-413-022 
06-19-210-018 
06-19-210-019 
06-19-210-023 
06-19-210-024 
06-19-210-025 
06-19-210-026 
06-19-210-027 
06-19-210-028 
06-19-224-026 
06-19-226-011 
06-19-226-015 
06-19-226043 
06-19-229-001 
06-20-108-002 
06-20-111-034 
06-20-114-001 
06-20-404-056 
06-20-404-057 
06-20-404-058 
06-20-404-059 
08-20-404-060 
06-20-413-015 
06-21-101-022 
06-21-101-049 
06-21-108-001 
06-28-111-011 
06-29-103-016 
06-29-201-002 
06-29-201-003 
06-29-201-004 
06-29-201-007 

60030 
06-27-400-038 

60030 

07-29-300-003 

10-02-400-033 

0200D-3179-GEN 

February 25, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS ) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE NINETEENTH 
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION ) 
OF TYLER DAVID BUSCH, ) 

FOR CHANGE OF NAME ) 

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION 
Public notice is hereby given on March 31, 2000, being one of the return days in 
the Circuit Court of Ihe County of Lake, I will lile my Petilion in said Court praying for 
the change ol my name from Tyler David Busch to that ol Tyler Robert Turnbull, pur- 
suant to the Slatute in such case made and Provided. 

Dated at Lake County, Illinois, February 18, 2000. 

/s/ Chris Turnbull 

0200C-3165-WL 

February 18, 2000 

February 25, 2000 

March 3, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON 

VERNON TOWNSHIP ROAD 

DISTRICT BUDGET 2000-01 

NOTICE IS HEREBY given that 

given that a tentative budget and 

appropriation ordinance for Road 

District purposes of the Town ol 

Vernon, in the County of Lake, Slate of 

Illinois, for the fiscal year beginning 

April 1, 2000 and ending March 31, 

2001 will be on lile and conveniently 

available for public Inspection at 3050 

N. Main St., Prairie View, Illinois from 

and after 9 o'clock a.m. March 6, 

2000. 

NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN 
hereby that a public hearing on said 
Budget and Appropriation Ordinance 
will be held al 9 a.m., April 8, 2000 at 
3050 N. Main Street, Prairie View, 
Illinois In the Town of Vernon and that 
final hearing and action on this ordi- 
nance will be taken at this time. 

Barbara Barnabee 

Town Clerk 

February, 2000 

0200D-3187-LB 

February 25, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
THAT ON MARCH 20TH OF 
2000, A SALE WILL BE HELD AT 
MIKE'S TOWING, INC. 908 N. RAND 
RD. WAUCONDA, IL 60084, TO SELL 
THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE(s) TO 
ENFORCE A LIEN EXISTING 
UNDER THE LAWS OF THE STATE 
OF ILLINOIS AGAINST SUCH ARTI- 
CLE^) FOR LABOR, SERVICES, 
SKILL OR MATERIAL EXTENDED 
UPON STORAGE FURNISHED FOR 
SUCH ARTICLE(s) AT THE 
REQUEST OF THE FOLLOWING 
DESIGNATED PERSON(s), UNLESS 
SUCH ARTlCLE(s) ARE REDEEMED 
WITHIN THIRTY (30) DAYS OF THE 
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. 

LARRY F. MAROTTA 

1985 KAWASAKI GP7 

MOTORCYCLE 

VIN # JKAZX2AIXFB510191 

IL LiC # 470269 

THE AMOUNT OF LIEN IS $4470.00 

AS OF MARCH 20, 2000 

AS PUBLISHED IN THE LAKELAND 

NEWSPAPER. 

0200D-3178-WL 

February 25, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE \ 
GRANT TOWNSHIP 

Notice Is hereby given that sealed 
proposals will be received at the office 
of THE GRANT TOWNSHIP CLERKS 
at 411 WASHINGTON STREET, 
INGLESIDE, ILLINOIS 60041 until 
7 o'clock p.m. on March 7, 2000 for 
furnishing of the following Equipment. 

New Overcenter Aerial Tree Truck 
with Chlpbox 

Specifications may be picked up at 
the Grant Township Highway Depart- 
ment, 26535 Molldor Road, Ingleside, 
IL 60041. Further Information regard- 
ing the letting may be obtained by con- 
tacting Jack Klesgen, Highway 
Commissioner at (847) 546-7623. 

Proposals shall be made on forms 
furnished by Ihe Highway Commis- 
sioner an d Mark the Sealed Envelope 
In Jack Kiesg pn Grant Township. 41 1 
Washlnnlon S t Ingteslrie. IL 60041 
"Bid For New Overcenter Aerial Tree 
Truck with Chlpbox." 

The Township In accordance with 
laws of the State Of Illinois hereby 
notifies all bidders that it will affirma- 
tively insure that the contract entered 
into pursuant to this advertisement will 
be awarded to the lowest responsible 
bidder without .discrimination on the 
ground of race, color or national origin. 

Jack Kiesgen 

Township Highway Commissioner 

February 22, 2000 

0200D3188-GEN 

February 25, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Housecalis 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Real Estate 

Home Inspection 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY; 33051 N. 
Cove Rd, Witdwood, IL 60030, (847) 
543-0951 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
David C. Rupp, 33051 N. Cove Rd, 
Wildwood. IL 60030, 543-0951 . 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true and legal full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. • > 

Is! David C. Rupp 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 10th day of February, 2000. 
OFFtCIAL SEAL 
/s/Vernadail M. Sorrenlino 
Notary Public 
Received: February 10, 2000 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0200D-3181-GL 
February 25, 2000 
March 3, 2000 
March 10, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Strictly 
Commercial Building Maintenance 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Building 

Maintenance & Repairs 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 150B1 
Wadsworth Rd., Wadsworth, IL 60083, 
(847) 625-0700 (physical). 
3567-B Grand Ave H109, Gurnee, IL 
60031-4607, (847) 625-0700 (mail- 
Ing). 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Scott R. Wille, 15081 Wadsworth Rd„ 
Wadsworth, IL 60083, (847) 625- 
0700. 

Lisa D. Witte, 15081 Wadsworth Rd., 
Wadwworlh Rd., Wadsworth, IL 
60083, (847) 625-0700. 
Frank Kuehner, 95 Split Oak Rd., 
Naperville, IL (630} 961-2976. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Scott R. Witte, February 7, 2000 
Isl Lisa D. Witte, February 7, 2000 
Isl Frank Kuehner, February 7, 2000 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct Ihe busi- 
ness this 7th day of February, 2000. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
Isl Nick Llogas 
Notary Public 
Received: February 7, 2000 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0200B-3157-GP 
February 11,2000 
February 18, 2000 
February 25, 2000 






February \25, 2000 



CLASSIFIED 




£&tai*tfied *im$vk1ide 




Personals .,,.....,.,. 125 

Auctions .130 

Business Personals ...... i .'...,_ .135 

Financial .140 



Help Wanted Part-Time 219 

Help Wanted Full-Time 220 

Employment Agencies v. .221 

Business Opportunities ......... .225 

Situations Wanted 228 

Child Care 240 

School/Instruction 250 



Antiques 301 

Appliances .304 

Barter/Trade .308 

Bazaars/Crafts 310 

Building Materials 314 

Business/Office Equipment .... .318 

Electronics/Computers ...'.... 320 

Farm Guide 324 

Firewood 328 

Garage/Rummage Sales 330 

Good Things To Eat ; 334 

Horses &Tuck 338 

Household Goods/Fumilurc 340 

Jewelry' . 344 

Lawn/Garden .348 

Clothing .349 

Miscellaneous 350 

Medical Equip/Supplies .354 

Musical Instruments 358 

Pets & Supplies .360 

Restaurant Equipment 364 

Tools & Machinery . . 368 

Wanted To Buy 370 



SiilS 



■■W-*e^r ■- 



Homes For Sale 500 

Homes For Rent 504 

Homes Wanted 508 

Homes Builders -510 

Condo/Town Homes .5 14 

Mobile Homes .518 

Apartments For Rent ... .520 

Apartments Wanted 524 

Apt/Homes To Share ; 528 

Rooms For Rent 530 

Buildings . . . . . 533 

Business Property For Sale 534 

Business Property For Rent 538 

Investment Property .540 

Mongagc Services' ..544 

Farms 548 

Vacant Lots/Acreage 560 

Resorts/Vacation Rentals . . . .* .564 

Out Of Area Property 568 

Cemetery Lots 570 

Real Estate Wanted '. . .574 

Real Estate Misc. 578 



: 't^#m$rti 



g£53£2£ 



Recrcalional Vehicles 704 

Snowmobilcs/ATVs 708 

Boats/Motors/Etc — 710 

Camping ■ .714 

Travel/Vacation 718 

Sports Equipment 720 

Airplanes .724 

ftamporipllon 

Care For Sale 804 

Rental/Leases 808 

Classic/Antique Cars 810 

Services & Parts .*. 814 

Car Loans/Insurance 818 

Vans 824 

Four Wheel Drive/Jeeps 828 

Trucks/Trailers .834 

Heavy Equipment 838 

Motorcycles .-..;...,, 844 

Wanted To Buy .848 






attribution 



Kenosha 
County 



Twin Lakes Sllv^to^g-^HB^to, 



Richmond 



Spring 
Grove; 

Johrisbiirg 




Kenothi 



McHenry ■■ 



Crystal, 
Like ' 

McHenry 

County 



<*■* —.flouna Ljka. 



Grayslake 






Island Lotto 




MllliximV- . _. 
-■v ■-. viion 

£l;vyadtworth 

Gurnw 

WaukcganJ 

North 
Mn Chicago P 




Oaks 



Wauconda 



North 
Bsfrtnaton Lake z ur |ch '• 

Klldcer 



Munrfeloln 

eN Vernon " y ijerty vUl* ys **"-.^ 



La k* Forest \ 



Harrington 



Long 

Grove 



Highland Park , , 



Doerficld 



•pitallne ■"* " 



Buffalo Grovo 



Northbrook 



Cook County 



HOW TO PLACE A 
CIASSIFIEDAD 



BY CALL 

PHONE (847)223-8161 

d Y Lakeland Newspapers 
iUaii P.O;Box268 

MAIL Grayslake, IL 60030 



IN 30 S.Whitney St. 

PERSON Grayslake 

BY 
FAX (847)223-2691 





f 



Lakeland Newspapers' Classifieds Appear In 11 Newspapers! 

Antloch News • Round Lake News • Lake Villa Record 

Mundelein News • Wadsworth News • Grayslake Times 

Fox Lake Press • Gurnee Press • Lindenhurst News 

Wauconda Leader • Libertyville News 




DEADLINES 

Direct Line Tues. 5pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party...Wed.l0am 
HOURS 

8am-8pm Mon.-Thurs 

8am-5pm... ......Friday 




dfll 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



110 


Noilces ! 



115 



- IjosI & Found 



125 


I Personals 



140 


Financial 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



ERRORS: 

We strive to eliminate 

errors, but if one should 

occur, please report t. 

immediately as we can be 

responsible for the. first two 

(2) weeks only. 

r N0 ADJUSTMENTS CAN 

BE MADE UNLESS THEY 

AFFECT.THE MATERIAL 

VALUE OF AN AD 



FOUND A CREAM COL- 
ORED TABBY WITH sky blue 
eyes, female, orange striped 
tail and face, Wauconda vicini- 
ty. (847) 526-0572, 

DID YOU FIND Someones 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Dept.. and get your 
results, FOUND ads are 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
(847)223-8161. 



ADOPTION WE ARE a 
stable childless couple with 
love in our hearts for a baby. 
We love lo square dance, go 
to zoos and spend time with 
friends. Please call us, Janet 
and Larry 1-800-670-1976. 



ATTENTION 
CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you have placed classified 
advancing with the Lakeland 
Newspapers you may receive a 
misleading statement from 
another firm requesting pay 
merit for this advertising. To 
receive proper credit to your 
account, all payments for your 
Lakeland Newspapers advertis- 
ing must be made as invoiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

PO BOX 2SB 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, IL 60030-0268 



120 


Free 



ELDERLY CARE- 

Provlded 24hrs in my Gur- 
nee home. One phone call 
can save you S1000's & pro- 
vide better care for your 
loved one. Certified CNA. 
Call (047) 855-2721 



$2,500 VISA/MASTER- 
CARD UNSECUREDI Guar- 
anteed approval!!) Bad cred- 
it/No credit OKI Includes full 
credit restoration. 23-year old 
company. Not a scam. 1-B00- 
566-9099 ext. 25 (SCA Net- 
work^ 

LOWER PAYMENTSI 

STOP late fees!' Stop or re- 
duce interest! Stop collector 
callsl FAMILY CREDIT COUN- 
SELING. Non-profit Christian 
Agency. RECORDED MES- 
SAGE 1-800-729-7964 



Dental 

Orthodontic 

Rssistant 

Wed, Fri, & occasional 

Mondays in Long Grove. 

Experience preferred, 

but will train. Call Karen 

847-634-61 66 



LARGE METAL OFFICE 

DESK 

(847) 487-^945 



ME 

.-v.- 



ittecloru 



i I i i.i i.»,JTWH 



Appliances Repair -S03 

Blacktop .' S06 

Builders S09 

Carpentry S 12 

Carpet Cleaning SI5 

Concrete/Cement SI 8 

Dry Wall S21 

Education/Instruction * • ■ -S24 

Electrical S27 

Firewood , * ■ • -S30 

Handyman .....,.,. .S33 

Heating/Air Conditioning . S36 

Housekeeping • S39 

Landscaping S42 

Laundry/Cleaning * • • -S45 

Legal Services S48 

Medical Services -S5 1 

Moving/Storage SS4 

Painting Decorating • -S57 

Paralegal/Typing Services .S60 

Plumbing • ■ ,; S63 

Pools • S66 

Pressure Washing ■ S69 

Professional Services ...;.... S72 

Radio/TV Repair * s ?5 

Remodeling S78 

Resumes .". s &' 

Roofing/Siding S84 

Storage • .S87 

Tax Service • S90 

Trees/Plants S93 

Wedding 

Miscellaneous 



WAKE UP 

With 

MAKE UP1 

MICRO TATTOOING 

Permanent 

'EYEBROWS 

•EYELINE 

•UPLINE. 

ALSO OFFERING 

ELECTROLYSIS. 

(Permanent Hair Removal) 

FREE Brochures, 

(847) 249-7446, 



HEALTHY WOMEN 

$5000.00 Compensation* 
Healthy women, age 20-33, need- 
ed lo serve as anonymous egg 
donors. Donors will be required to 
lake medication, blood screening 
& undergo minor surgical proce- 
dure. We are Interested In all eth- 
nic backgrounds. Multiple locations 
available. II interested call 
ARR 773-327-7315 
Serious Inquiries Only 



ATTENTION 

PET OWNERS 

WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 

ACCEPT ADS FOR 

ANIMALS IN OUR FREE/ 

GIVE AWAY COLUMN. 

If you must give up your 

pet, please consider these 

facts. 

*Free animal ads suggest 
that there is something 
wrong with the animal, or 
that It has no value. 
•Some people who re- 
spond to these free animal 
ads are not reputable and 
are more concerned about 
making a profit than the 
animal. 

'Charging a fee to a poten- 
tial pet owner confirms the 
responsibility of pet owner- 
ship for an entire lifetime 
of that pet. For more Infor- 
mation, please contact the 
Humane Society. 



125 


Personals 



LOSE WEIGHT THE 
HEALTHY WAY 

Safe all natural, fast and easyl 
100% Guaranteed. 
You have nothing to lose . 

but inches! 
Call today 8B8-206-9684. 

PSYCHIC READER 
Specializes In Taro, 

Palmistry, Crystal Readings. 
Solves all problems. 

Love, Business, Health, etc. 
(63 0) 734-9452. 

SUBMIT YOUR LAKELAND 
CLASSIFIED ADS ON THE 
INTERNETI 
Visit htlp://www.lpnews.com/ 
to place your ads conven- 
iently. Ads appear on the In- 
terne!, In all Lakeland Pa- 
pers... The Great Lakes Bul- 
letin and The Market Journal 
for only $20.50 for 4 lines 
(approximately 16 words), 
then .60c each additional 
line. 

ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad in the 
Lakeland Classifieds.- Free 
and Giveaways are run at NO 
CHARGE! (We discourage 
any pet ads). Deadlines: 10am 
Wednesdays. (847) 

223-R1 61.0X1.1 40. 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



♦CLEANING 

HELP 

♦BARTENDER 

847-587-7020 



DENTIST 

For Libertyville . 

dental office needs 

someone to run 

soft tissue 

management program 

on Wednesday & alternate 

Saturdays. 

Please call 

847-367-5252 

or fax resume to 
847-367-5257 



Answering 
Service 

Looking for PT 

2nd Shift & Weekends 

**?loase Call** 
847-367-7900 



LOOKING FOR A JOB WTTH 

FLEXIBLE HOURS? 

PART-TIME? 

No experience 

necessary. 

Maid To Please 

will train. 

Must be reliable, have 

reliable car, 

proof of Insurance 

and a home phone. 

Please call 

(847)838-1152. 



CLERICAL 

POSITION 

15-20 Hours per week. 
Some computer | < 
experience necessary. 

RE/MAX Advantage 

Antioch 

Please call Helen @ 

847-395-3000X104 



S99 



LAKELAND IS OPEN 
24 HOURS 

If you need to place an ad In 

Classified, call us at 
{847)223-8161,6x1. 140 

and leave a message. 

We will gel back to you by 

Ihe next business day. Or 

you can fax our 24 -hour fax 

lineal (847) 223-2691. 



Classified Ads 
Get Resists. 

To Flaea An Art Can 
847.223^161 



<3- w 




C.E.O. 

Egg Donors Needed 

• Give the gift of life to an infertile couple 

• Our program is completely anonymous 
24 hour/7 day support 

• Appointments available for evenings and weekends 



$5 ,000 Compensatio n 

Coll Nancy or Staccy 

847-656-8733 Pager 847-547-9788 

The Center for Egg Options Illinois. Inc. 



COOK-Part Time 
Interested In flexible part time 
hours? Cook needed ($9.00/ 
hour) In our 15 bed Interme- 
diate care facility located In 
Gurnee It- 
Inquire within: 
Peggy Larvlck 
(847) 055-9450 



Restaurant 

DIETARY 
ASSISTANT 

Victory Lakes Continuing Care 
Center has exciting opportunities 
lor dependable Individuals. Flexi- 
ble PART TIME positions avail- 
able. You will be responsible tor 
completing basic kitchen duties 
and dishes. 

Evening, weekend and holiday 
premiums. Full benefits package 
available II you work al least 40 
hours in a two-week period: 
Please apply in person at the 
Continuing Care Center, 100S 
Grand Avenue In Unden- 
hurat Ph: 847-356-4551 . eoe. 



DENTAL 
HYGENIST 

Busy Lake Forest, 
office 
seeks part time Dental 
Hygenist. Must be reli- 
able & outgoing. For 
■ more information 
please call: 
847-234-8608 . 



WANTED 

HOUSEKEEPER 

Twin Lakes, 

Wisconsin area. 

Full or Port-time. 

3-5 Days per Week. 

Year Round. 

Hours f loxlble for 
working mom. 

Must be reliable and 
have references. 

(263) 877-2268. 



WE NEED 

Plasma Donors 

Immediately. 

Earn $100 

in the 1st 2 whs I 

For info or appt. call 

414-654-1366 



:c 



~> ,;^r^ fc *- , **j* ^.«*Lp^--?>f7»^r^ >^--. 



— h i i ■* ■ ■«■ 



C 1 6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 25, 2000 



HE 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



LOOKING FOR A JOB WITH 

FLEXIBLE HOURS? 

PART-TIME? 

No oxponcnco 

necessary, 

Maid To Please 

will train. 

Must be reliable, have 

reliable car, 

proof of insurance 

and a home phone. 

Please call 

(847)838-1152. 




Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



. 



— t 



• 



~.j 



i 
t 

> 

► 
i 

: 

i 



Lake Villa Office 

We have 3 immediate openings. 

No experience necessary/will train. 

Mon - Thurs 5-8:30 pm/Sat 9-2 pm 

P/T & possibility for advancement. 

Hourly 4- Commission. 

Kevin 245-7500 




Want to earn up to $250 per 
week and be your own boss? 

The Daily Herald is looking for adult, 
independent personnel for newspaper 
delivery in the Lake County area. 2-3 
hour routes available between the 
hours of 2 a.m. & 6 a.m., Monday thru 
Friday; 2 a.m. - 7 a.m., Saturdays, 
Sundays and Holidays. 

For more information call. . . 
(847) 427-4:333 



** 



tf 



Telemarketing 

Time an 

your 
hands? 

Now's your chance to cash In on your free time. 




Lakeland Newspapers is now accepting 
applications for part time telephone sales 
to work from our Grayslake office. No 
experience necessary (but a plus). 

RETIREES 

COLLEGE STUDENTS 

HOUSEWIVES 

Must enjoy talking to people. Hourly wage plus 

bonus. Flexible Hours Mon. -Thurs. 3:30-8:30 

For Interview Call Classified Manager 

Lakeland Publishers, Inc. 

(847) 223-8161, cxt. 109 

or fax resume to: (847) 223-2691 



■sMMMWMMWIMAMMMMWIM 



School Bus 
__ Monitors/ 
Drivers Aides 



pmm 



■ Bring your kids 
to work option! 

■ Paid Training 

■ Paid Holidays 

■ Paid Vacations 

■ Annual Bonuses 

■ Medical/ Dent a I & Life tns. 

■ Tuition Aid Up to $1 5(X)/y r 

■ Various Shifts and hours 

■Employee Shuttle 

No weekend, holiday or 
evening hours required! 

Call today! 

847-244-1066 



Accounting 

COST ACCOUNTANT 

Due to our continued pouih ind 
expansion this established ISO 
9002 manufacturer of machined 
pans located In ihc Lake County 
area or Illinois, Is seeking an cipc- 
rtenced Cost Accountant to Join 
our team. 

This position will be responsible 
for analyzing the plant's financial 
results/measures and Identify 
opportunities for Improvements, 
verify feasibility and accuracy, 
compile costs forecasts to enhance 
Dnandal planning; and assist In 
policy admlnlsiraiion and budget- 
ing preparation. We require a (IS 
degree In Accounting Finance or 
Business administration with a 
minimum of 5 years as a Cost 
Accountant In a manufacturing 
environment. Must be profldenl In 
spreadsheet programs (Excel, 
Visual Manufacturing, etc.). 

The qualified candidate will be 
offered a competMve compensa- 
tion and benefits package Includ- 
ing 40 IK and Profit Sharing. For 
Immediate consideration, forward 
resume with salary history to 
Human Resources at: 
Hello Precision Products 
60 1 N. Skoklc llwy. 
Lake Bluff, It. 60044 
FAX: 8-17-473-1306 
EOE M/F/D/V 



School Bus Driver 



The Lake Zurich School District is 
looking for safety-conscious, kid-ioving individuals 
interested in driving a school bus for bur children. 
No experience necessary. Retirees welcomed. 

• Excellent wages from $ 1 1 .60 hr 

• Paid training 

• Health and life insurance 

• Bring your kids to work 

• Retirement program 

• Summer pay program 
To find out more about our caring team, 

call Vicky or Cindy at (847) 438-2834. 



Special 
Writer 



Writer with fluid, 

journalistic style 

needed to handle 

market-oriented 

assignments in Like 
County area. Can 
work in office or 

from home. Handle 
own scheduling. 

Ability to produce 

crisp, focused copy 
quickly a must. 

Photography ability a 

plus. Send cover let- 
ter and resume to: 

Bob Schrocder 
General Sales Manager 
Lakeland Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 60030 



SCHOOL BUS 



DRIVERS 

Part-lime 

$ll.**0/hr+ 

{higher for experienced driven) 

■Bring Your Kids To 

Work Option 
■Transportation Assise 

■ Paid Training 

■ Paid Holidays 

■ Paid Vacations 

■ Annual Bonuses 

■ Life Insurance 

■ Tuition Aid 

■ Various Shifts 
And hours 

Call Today! 

Lake Forest 

(847)680-9305 

Park City 
(847)244-5690 




X£y& 



ociyoui-ife^to 

TALK?!? 



■ . ■ , ■ • 

We//, we've aoi (he foG for tjou ! 



Lakeland Newspapers is looking for 
outgoing people who are looking for a great 
part-time Job. 

You will be selling new and renewal 
subscriptions to 1 1 different Lakeland 
Community Newspapers & doing other 
customer service related work. 
Hourly wage & bonusl 

Monday-Thursday 5:00-8:30pm 
Saturday 9am-2:00pm. 
Hourly rate + commission. 



For interview 
call Kevin 
847-245-7500 





Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



SECURITY 

The Village* al Victory Lakes has 
a part time (30 hours/wk) position 
available. Responsibilities Include 
monitoring campus buildings & 
grounds, assisting In emergency 
slluatlons, and working with main- 
tenance depl. Valid driver's li- 
cense required, Hours are 8pm • 
6:30am. Must be able to work 
every other weekend. Benefits 
available. 

Please apply in person al: 
Victory Lakes Continuing 
Cure Center, 1055 Grand Ave- 
nue, Undonhurst, IL 60046. 
For more Information call 
(847)356-4551. EOE 



REAL ESTATE RESEARCH 
PERMANENT PART-TIME 



WORK 2 WEEKS EVERY 3 MONTHS. 
FLEX. IlltS. DOING REAL ESTATE 
RESEARCH IN AREAS OF GURNEE, 
UDEmmE, AND NORTH- 
BROOK, WHEELING, MOUNT 
PROSPECT, GLENV1EW. IDEAL FOR 

RETIREES AND I lOMEMAKERS 

W/AIMUTY TO READ MAPS, GOOD 

W/SIMPLE MATH, WELL 

GROOMED, W/CAR. PERSONS 

WITH FULL TIME JOB NEED NOT 

APrLY. 

HOURLY RATE + MILEAGE CALL 

4 FRAN AT (847)776-9080. 



TELEPHONE WORK 
FROM HOME 



Scheduling pick-ups of 

discarded items for a 

well-known charity. 

• Pleasant personality 

• Flexible hours 

• Paid Weekly 

Reliability a must! 

Please call 
(630) 515-5766 



ASSISTANT LIBRARIAN 

Children's Services 
Part-time 16-18hrs, week- 
ly, evenings & alternating 
Fridays/Saturdays. Duties 
Include reference, pro- 
graming, and collection 
development. Wages; 
SI 0.50/hr.B.A required 
Computer skills required; 
experience with children 
preferred. Send resume to; 
Ms. Jan Staudemeyer, ' 
Wauconda Area Public Li- 
brary, 801 N. Main St. 
Wauconda II. 600Q4 or 
FAX to (B47) 525-6244 



220 



Help Wauled 
Full-Time 



53,000 WEEKLYI MAIL- 
ING 400 brochures at home. 
Guaranteed FREE supplies. 
Call 1-800-489-9477, ext. 78 
(24hrs) OR RUSH SASE: MOI. 
2472 Broadway, Suite 338-Ci, 
New York, NY 10025 (SCA 
Network). 



***** 

FLOOR CARE/ 

niflinTEnnncE 

FT Janitor needed M-F 

with some maintenance 

responsibilities. 

Must work well 

independently & be a 

good team player. 

Previous floor care 

exp. helpful 

but will train. 

Apply In person at: 

CURE CENTRE OF 

wnuconDn 

176 Thomas Ct. 

Wauconda, IL 60084 

847-526-5551 

***** 



•OFFICE MANAGER 

•STYUST 

•NAIL TECH 

•MAKEUP ARTIST 

Flex. Hrs. Please Apply 

In Person or Call 

OFF BROADWAY 

4949 Grand Ave, Qurneo 

047-662-6603 



A WORLD OF OPPORTUNE 
TY...Wilh International stud- 
ents. Recruit and supervise 
host families and exchange 
students. Earn money and 
travel Incentives on part-time 
basis. For more information, 
call Stormy Weston at (800) 
448-9944, ext. 316, Council 
Exchanges USA High School 
Program. 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



pETil 



r| Help Wanted. 



Full-Time 



Accounting 

PAYROLL 

CLERK 

FT position In prep, of 

paychecks for 

N. Shore 

luxury custom home 

dosignor/bullder. 
Must be accurate, detail 
oriented, computer literate; 
two years payroll exp. 
Upscale and friendly of- 
fice environ; great benefits 
Include 401 K, 
pd. health/dental. 
Fax cover letter, 
resume, salary 
requirements to 
HR: 847-914-9781 



AG POSITIONS: MANAG- 
ER, S50K; Agronomist $52K; 
DSM S44K; GPS Mgr. $48K; 
International S60K; Applicator 
S36K and more. Bill Meyer, 
Agra Placements Ltd,, Lin- 
coin, II. 217-735-4373. 

AIM HIGH NEW Bonuses 
Available! Up to $12,000 En- 
listment Sonus lor those who 
qualify . $1,000. if on active 
duty by 31 May 2,000. (me- 
chanical/electronic carreer 
feilds) * Tuition "Medical & 
Dental Care . If your a High 
School Grad between 17-27, 
call 1-800-423-USAF for an 
information packet or visit 
www.alrforce.com AIR 
FORCE 

ASSEMBLY AT HOME. 

Arts, crafts, jewelry. Also elec- 
tronics, sewing, typing in your 
spare time. GREAT PAYl'No 
experience needed. Will train. 
1-800-591-1860 ext. 3 
(24hrs.). (SCA Network). 



BEHAVIOR 
SPECIALIST 

Immediate opening at our 

Lake Zurich Intermediate 

Care Facility 

for a full time 

Behavior Specialist. 

Must have 

Bachelor's Degree In 

Fsyc. or related field 

and at least 1 year 

experience wilh behavior 

modification and program 

development & 

Implementation, 

preferably with Adulls 

with 

Developmental 

Disabilities. 

If Interested, contact 

Ml, St, Joseph 

on Monday or Thursday 

between 

7am and 12:00pm. 

847-438-5050 



BILLER EARN UP TO 
$40K PER YEAR. Easy Med- 
ical Claims Processing. Train- 
ing provided, Computer re- 
quired. No previous experi- 
ence necessary. Flexible 
hours. 888-660-6693, ext. 115 
(SCA Network). 



DOWNTOWN 

LIBERTYVILLE 

INSURANCE OFFICE 

Looking for full-time Office 

Manager. Computer skills 

Bookkeeping and 

Customer Service 

Experience a Plus. 

Salary Commensurate 

with experience. 

Call Russ (847) 247-881 1 

FAX resume 

(847)247-8822. 



CLEANERS 

Immediate openings 
for cleaners in our 

Lake Zurich 

Intermediate Care 

Facility. 

Part time 

& 

Full time 

positions available, 

Will be responsible 

for cleaning women 

resident homes, 

within the facility. 

It interested, contact 

Mt. St, Joseph 
847-438-5050 



DATA ENTRY NATIONAL 
Billing Service seeks a full/part- 
time medical biller. Salary at 
$46K per year. PC required. 
No experience needed. Will 
train. Call 1-888-646-5724 
(SCA Network). 




How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 

Dear Search, 

Q: 1 wsj offered a job with a fine company. I lold the employer that I would 
have to give my present employer a 2- week notice upon accepting the new 
position. The new employer lold me that (heir needs were Immediate and 
although Ihcy would appreciate me giving only a 1-wcck notice to my present 
employer, Ihcy agreed to a 2-wcckstnrtingdatc During the weekend before [ 
was to start my new job, after having already left my former employer, I con- 
tracted what I thought was a virus that kept me from starling my job on the 
first day. When I called my new employer to tell them, they seemed to under- 
stand. I called on Ihc second day and lold (hem I was still under the weather 
and they seemed to rctuclanlly understand. They asked me If I had seen ■ 
physician and 1 (old them thai I would try lo go that day. On Thursday f called 
the company and said thai 1 could start (he job the following Monday. The 
company was upset with this and said thai Ihc workload was piling up, that 
they had released Ihc other employee who had been on the job previously, 
brought In a temp, and that It was Imperative that I show up to work on 
Monday wilh a doctor's excuse. Come Monday, I re allied that I had no nolc to 
give the employer, mainly because I didn't feci I needed to visit the doctor, 
but I look my chances and showed up for work anyway. When I was greeted 
by the Personnel Manager, she Immediately asked for my doctor's note. I told 
her I never went to the doctor. Shcloldmelhatlhcyhcldlhc position an addi- 
tional week , as had been agreed upon, and she had to hire a temp lo come In 
and help out the days Uiat I was nol there. They think that, In Ucu of this, they 
may call ihc temp back In or continue looking for someone lo fill this posi- 
tion. They already hired me. How can Ihcy do lhatt 
EM.-FoxUke 

A; Dear EM,, 

Technically, although you were hired, you never actually consummated your 
employment. People do gel sick. I have yd lo come across a sickness that was 
timely. I understand your predicament. However, I also understand theirs. If 
you (old ihc in you were to sec a doctor, you should have followed through or 
lold them you didn't reel you needed one. One draw back to this untimely Ill- 
ness Is that they had a perfect opportunity lo faring In that temporary who 
then showed them what he/she could do. Pick yourself up and don't dwell on 
lids. Who knows, perhaps your former employer would welcome you back. 
NOTE- Temporary assignments con lead lo full-time permanent Job place- 
ments. It allows for Ihc perfect opportunity to "show them whal you can do." 



Send your Inquiries to our new website 
www.superiorpersonneLcom 

Note: Nancy Sakol Is a licensed personnel professional 
and President of Superior Personnel In Gumce. 

Letters can be sent to Nancy Sakol 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers. 

P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 

PLACEMl@aol.com 







February, 25, 2000 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / C.I 7 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



DRIVER COVENANT 
TRANSPORT . *Coast to 
.coast- runs Teams start 35£- 
37« $1,000 sign-on bonus for 
exp. co.. drivers. For experi- 
enced drivers and owner op- 
erators ,1-800-441 -4394, For. 
graduate students 1-800-338- 
642S. 

DRIVER- COMPANY DRIV- 
ERS and owner operators. 
Call today and ask about our 
Great new 'Bonus packagesl 
Boyd Bros. 800-543-8923 
(OO's call 800-633-1377). 
E.O.E. 



DRIVERS 

We have Immediate 
openings for dependable 

and professional OTR 

semi-drivers. If you have a 

valid CDL, good driving 

record and one year mln. 

experience call or stop In 

for an application. 

PRYOR TRUCKING, INC. 

1201 PryorSt. 

Silver Lake, Wi. 

800-236-8524. 



DRIVERS - NEW 2K PAYI 
OTR: 6/mo. exp. - ,30/cpm.top 
pay - .40/cpm. Regional: 
.36/cpm. Jump Start Lease 
Program. MS Carriers 1-800- 
231-5209 EOE. 

DRIVERS- REGIONAL DRIV- 
ERS needed-Slar Transport 
Inc. is hiring experienced 
drivers- No experience we 

will train. Full company bene- 
fits. Excellent home time - 
Great miles. Call us today at: 
800-548-6082 Ext. 805 



DRIVERS— SMX WANTS 
you behind the wheel! WE 
offer *39 cents /mile Earning 
potential, 'complete benefit 
package. ' 'Lease purchase 
program 'Guaranteed home 
time! Call Recruiters today! 1- 
800-247-8040 SMITHWAY 
MOTER XPRESS 

www.smxc.com 



DRIVERS— MARTEN 
TRANSPORT LTD., Marten 
Transport can pay you- 
Myear -29c *2 years-<30 »3 
years -C31 *4 years -C32 *5 
years -c33 Call. 1-800-395- 
3331 

www.martenxom 



DRIVERS; INEXPERI- 

ENCED TRAINING available. 
North American Van Linos 
has a tractor trailer 4 8- state 
hauling opportunites tor own- 
er/operators /temporary com- 
pany drivers, call 800-348- 
2147 Dept. IIS. 



DRVUJRLL 


THPERS 


WANTED 


401 K; all hourly rate. 
We supply tools. 
Altmann Drywall & Palnt- 
' Ing 


847-526-8273 



220 



. Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




EARN EXTRA MONEY 
Work one weekend a month 
and two weeks a year and re- 
ceive ,100%. college tuition, the" 
Montgomery G.I, Bill and an 
excellent paycheck. You may 
also qualify' for a cash enlist- 
ment bonus. Call your local 
National Guard representative 
today at 1-800-GO-GUARD. 

EASYWORKI 
NO EXPERIENCE 

$500-51 ,000 part-time at 

home stuffing envelopes: 

For free information send 

self-addressed, 

stamped envelope: 

R&J Enterprises 

Mailing Services, Inc. 

P.O. Box 402 
tngleside, III. 60041. 



EMERGING COMPANY 

NEEDS Medical Insurance 
billing assistance Immediately, 
If you have a: PC you can 
earn 525,000 to $50,000 an- 
nually. Call 1-B00-291-4683 
Dept. #107 (SCA Network). 



FR0I1T DESK 

necePTionisTs 

We are growing & we need 

Front Desk 

Receptionists 

FT/PT at our new 

Llbertyvllte location. 

Great hours, 

friendly environment, 

benefits available. 

Experience preferred but 

will train the right person. 

Please call 

847-362-3444 or 

fax resume to 

847-362-4672 or 

atop by & fill out an . 

application at 

307 S. Milwaukee Ave. 



Full time s ales-minded 

CUSTOMER 

SERUICE 

REPRESENTHTIUE 

needed, 

Must be detail-oriented, 

friendly and outgoing, with 

a positive attitude. 

Computer experience 

necessary. 

Call 

847-526-1380 

to schedule 

an Interview or 

fax resume to 

847-526-3377. 



I 



Full/Part Time 

Flexible Hours 
AM/PM Shifts Available 

*WAITSTAFF 

Apply in Person 
ask for Pete 

RIGBY'S 
RESTAURANT 

1910 E.Grand 

Undenhurst 

647-356-4440 



Help Wanted 1 
Full-TJme 



Full/Part Time 

FOODSERVICE 

WORKERS 

, Excellent HoursI 
Great Pay I Hiring Bonusl 
, Plosso Call 
847-270-30B3 



GENERAL 
OFFICE 

Smalt but very. 

busy office. 

Seasonal 

March thru Dec. 

Wide variety of duties In- 
cluding customer service, 
billing, filing and schedul- 
ing, 

Call 847-487-0000 



LOOKII- DRIVERS NEEDED! 
Get your CLD and a great 
Jobl Get paid while In school. 
No money out of your pock- 
et. If qualify , earn up to 
$800. weekly. 15-Day Com- 
pany paid training . 1-800- 
398-9908. ask for Carol 



MAINTENANCE 
PERSON 

Wanted for 

apartments In 

Antloch. IL 

Must possess 

malntonance/Janltorlal 

skills, and 

good people skills, 

experience preferred. 

Compensation package 

includes health insurance, 

40 IK and paid vacation. 

E.O.E. 

Interested parties, please 

submit resume to: 

Box VW-LL 

P.O.Box 68 

30 S. Whitney St 

Grayslake, IL 60030 



MAINTENANCE 

PROFESSIONAL 

Sought In 

far north suburbs. 

BUILDING TRADES 

PROFICIENCIES 

NECESSARY 

FOR 

SUCCESSFUL 

CANDIDATE. 

Work environment 

Includes Indoor & 

outdoor fobs. 

Interested parties may fax 

resume & wage history to 

the attention of Darrin. 

847-740-5014 



lS,0 



In search of that . 
perfect employee? 



We can help you flndtfjSt 
perfect pora^£Cair > 

toda; 

tuntttf medical opportune 

rt£or job folr odfri th<r 

next Lakeland) paper. 

847-223^3200 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Market Segment 
Manager 

Immed Opening. Thermal 
Ceramics, Inc. Augusta, 
GA-a mulli-nat'l mfr of high- 
temp: & advanced ceramic 
materials, has an exc chal- 
lenging career oppty in Pro- 
duct Mgmt for an ambi- 
tious, results-oriented Mar- 
ket Segment Mgr-Speclal 
Shapes, duals incl a BS 
Deg, in ceramic engineer 
Ing w/5yrs exp selling in 
dustrial products pref In the 
refractory/fibers industry, 
exp working w/the semi- 
conductor Industry a plus 
Must Identify & investigate 
product/market oppty's for 
special shapes, pursue 
opptys & Implement pro- 
grams to meet the market- 
ing/sales objectives for 
special shapes & manage 
the distribution } of these 
products. Reqs extensive 
travel. Position can be 
loe'd either out of Augusta, 
GA or Chgo, IL area. Good 
lime mgmt, organization 
al/communicatiorV, 
Interpersonal skills. This 
Is a nonsmoking facility. A 
comp salary & an exc bnft 
pkg, Incl 401 K & defined 
bnft plans offered. 

Resume: 

THERMAL CERAMICS, 

INC. 

HR Dept. 

PO Box 923 

Augusta, GA 30903-0923 

EOE/M/F/D/V 



To place an ad with 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Call 847.223.8161 



mEDICAL DOSimtTRIST 

Des Moines. IA-lmmed Opening. 
Position avail tor (or F/T eert'd 
Medical Doslmeirlst in free stand- 
ing radiation therapy center. 
Comp salary & exc bnlts ottered. 
Submit resume/inquiries: Robert 
Jacobsen, THERAPEUTIC RA- 
DIOLOGY ASSOCIATES, 411 
Laurel St, Ste Cico, Des 
Moines, IA 50314; 

Call 515-643-0780 



OPTICAL 
IMAGER 

* 

CLERICAL 

Entry level position. 
Excellent benefit and 

salary package. 

Position requires: 
Good organizational, 

Interpersonal and 
communication skills. 
Typing and data entry 
experience required. 

Send resume to 
860 Northpoint Blvd. 
Waukegan, IL 60085 
Attn: Kim Chapman 




Rs a Laldtauj school bus driver, you mill enloy very appealing extras Ilka those: 

• *500 sign-on bonus" 

• Paid Training 

> Mo Nights Or Weekends Required 

> Advancement Opportunities 

• Summers & Holidays Off (Summer Work Available] 

• PRE-SCHOOL CHILDREN MAY RIDE ON BUS WITH PARENT DRIVER 

• INDEPENDENT WORK ENVIRONMENT! 

What a great way to help your community and your Income potential. 



1 -!>;__ 

Beach Park •Vernon Hills • Mundelein •Wheeling 
SIl.eO/Hr. to ! 



MiRira 



Ramada Inn-Waukegan • Green Bay Rd. 

i-Slto Intervlewa 



• IOam-4pm 




Laidlatii uulll donate $BOQ per hire to any chgrch or community 
organization' who refers members that are successfully hired. 



5ERVHVG THE CHICAGOLArUD AREA WITH BD LOC/VTIOIVS 

Equal Opportunity Employer .** New hires only. For'most locations. 




Help Wanted : 
M-Tlme 



220 



Help Wanted 
Pull-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
. Full-Time 



Photography 
IMAGING TECHNICIAN 

Danaher Controls, a Fortune 
500 company located In 
northern IL, has an Immed 
opening for an Imaging Tech- 
nician. Qualified applicant 
w/possess the following 
skills; ability to use exposing 
equipt, wet bench process 
Ing (developing, etching & re 
slst stripping) & microscopic 
inspection. Previous exp En 
Him processing for the graph 
Ic arts field and/or related all 
v'er halide and/or diazo film 
processes is a plus. We offer 
a competitive wage & benefit 
pkg Including medical, den- 
tal, vision, 401k, vacation & 
holidays effective the 1st day 
of emplymt. Qualified candi- 
dates may submit resume 
w/salary req's to; 

Danaher Controls 

1675 Oelany Road 

Glim ae, I L 60031 

Fax: 047-662-6633 

EOE M/F/D/V 



RECEPJION1ST 

UbJLE 
orthodontic practice. 

Pleasant, articulate 

person 

, to answer busy phones 

& schedule appts. 

Good communication & 

computer skills req'd. 

4 day work week. 

Groat bonoflts, 

847-367-6565 



PIANO TEACHERS NEED- 
ED To teach In children's 
'homes, FT/PT. Flexible sched- 
uling, S21-$23/hr. (847) 
492-1833, 



RETAIL CASHIERS/ 
STOCK CLERKS. 

Sweeney OH/ Citco is 
seeking FT cashiers 
and stock clerks for our 
high volume location In 
Lake Zurich. Exp not 
necessary, will train. Ex- 
cellent benefits and 
competitive pay with an 
Increase after 90 days. 
Please stop by the store 
to fill out an application. 
Lake Zurich 
(847)438-5722 
Rand and Miller Rd. 



Social Services 
FUlX/ PART TIME CNA/ 
HABIUTATtON AIDES'; 

Are you tired of not being 
recognized for a job well 
done?, Arc you a caring In- 
dividual who would enjoy 
working with a small group 
of Developmental!;/ Disa- 
bled Adults? Interested in 
a ratio of 3 clients per staff 
member? We have open- 
ings for full and part time 
Certified Nursing Assis- 
tants or Habiltatlon Techni- 
cians. We offer excellent 
benefits and will also train 
and certify the appropriate 
candidates. Please con 
tact: 

Peggy Larvick 

(847) 855-9450 



it- 



START YOUR OWN BUSSI- 
NESS I Set your own sched- 
ule. Control your own in- 
come, at work through fun- 
draisers. AVON REPRE- 
SENTATIVE. CALL (888)942- 
4053 



PRODUCT 

MANAGER 

Immed Opening. Thermal 
Ceramics, Inc, a multi-nat'l 
mfr of high-temp. & ad 
vanced ceramic materials, 
has an exciting career 
oppty for a results-oriented 
Product Mgr. This key 
mgmt position is loe'd at 
the Min-K Olv. in Elkhart, 
IN. Quals Incl a BS Deg. in 
engineering or marketing 
w/a min of 3yrs Industrial 
marketing/sales exp. Must 
Identify & investigate pro 
duct/market opptys for high 
efficiency Insulating pro 
ducts, pursue opptys & 1m 
plement programs to meet 
the marketing/sales objec 
lives. Extensive travel, 
good communication/inter- 
personal/organizational 
skills. This Is a nonsmok 
Ing facility. A comp salary 
& an exc comprehensive 
bnft pkg, incl 401 K & de 
fined bnft plans offered: For 
immed consideration^; for- 
ward confidential resume 
w/sal history; 

THERMAL CERAMICS, 

INC., HR Dept. 

PO Box 923 

Augusta, GA 30903-0923 
EOE/M/F/D/V 



SECURITY 
OPPORTUNITIES 

For over seventy years Ini- 
tial Security has been pro- 
viding premier security 
services throughout Chica- 
goland. We have Imme- 
diate openings In this area 
on all shifts, including 
weekends for dependable 
and conscientious people. 
Must be 18 years of age, 
have own car and no crimi- 
nal arrest history and 
enjoy responsibility. NO 
EXPERIENCE RE- 

QUIRED; TRAINING PRO- 
VIDED. Salary starting at 
S8.00 per hour. Call or 
apply in person; ■ 

INITIAL SECURITY 
(847) 480-3210 

3710 Commercial Ave. 

Northbrobk, IL 60062 
EOE/m/f/d/v 



Social Services 

SUPPORTED LIVING 
ASSISTANT 
Work one on one with de- 
velopmental disabilities in 
their homes in the Gurnee 
area. Late afternoon / even- 
ing / weekend hours avail 
able. Must have own car 
and be over 18 yrs ol age. 
Call Marcy at 
Claarbrook 
(847) 259-6620 X 233 



WORK FROM HOME 

Earn an Extra 
$500-51 500/mo.PT. 

$2,000-$7,000/mo. FT. 
(601) 323-7747. 

I I I I I IIIIHIMIMIIII I IMH 



SK1PTRACER 

- Full time opening 
for a skipt/acer. 

Responsible for findi; 



ng 



customers who change 

residence or telephone 

numbers without 

notifying creditors. 

Skiptracing 

experience 

a plus. 

Send resume to 

860 Northpoint Blvd. 

Waukegan, IL 60085 

or fax to 

847-887-8501 

or call 
847-887-8508 
for an Interview. 



WELDER 
Custom Manufacturer of 
vacuums needs 
full-time, first shift 
welder. 
Must read blue prints, 
MIG weld and have some 
familiarity with TIG. 
Good benefit package 
and profit sharing avail- 
able. 
Come fn for application. 
Meyer Machine 

& Equip. 
351 Main St., 

Antloch. 

(847) 395-2970, 

FAX (847) 395-2972. 



»•- 



Executive 

Administrative 

Assistants Needed! 

Word, Excel and PowerPoint 
needed. One year or experi- 
ence preferred Sl2-$\6/hr. 
All positions In the Northern 
suburbs. 
Not accessible by 
public transportation. 
Please call Anra at (847) 808-5700 or 
Fax resumes to (847) 459-1956 
ProStaff 

EOE 



IIMIIUIIIil 



Warehouse 



V-'/t'./ 



sftiitia 



£ 

.^ 
# 









OPEN HOUSE AT 
PALATINE! 

When: Saturday, February 26th 

From: 9am to 2pm . > 

Where: 2100 N. Hicks Road 



The first 100 interviewees at the Open 
House will receive one free movie pass! 



PACKAGE HANDLERS 

Steady, Part-Time Jobs • $8.50-$9.50/Hour 
Weekends & Holiday! Off AND Great Benefits 
$500 Bonus at Palatinel 



up to $23 ,000 ; 

College Education Assistance with 
the UPS Earn & Learn Program! 



PALATINE* 

(Hicks & Rand Rds.) 
, Sunrise Shift, 3am-8am • twilight Shift, 5pm- 10pm 

Unable to attend? Call our facility direct 

Ph: 847-705-6025 

Or call our 24-hour fobllne ah 

1-888-4UPS-JOB 

Access Code: 4486 

We have additional opportunities at our 
Hodgkhs, Addison ana Northbrook facilities. 

Get to UPS by PACE! 

lb PaloHno from Elgin take but #556 

www.upsjobs.com/chicago 

'Program guideline* apply. College education 
auitrance Is available at Hodgkins, Addison, 
Palatine and Chicago (Jefferson St.) Facilities, 

iiminnmmiimrii irnt m_ 






The UPS 
EARN& 

LEARN 
Program 



W 11 



Equal Opportunity Employer 



C18 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 25, 2000 



i 



i 



> 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-lime 




r. Property Mgr. - ^ 
120 Section 8 Elderly, 
Tax Credit npts., Liberty 
vlllc. Must be self starter, 
fully participate and 
achieve In training pro- 
gram, work independent 
ly, follow directions with 
minimal supervision, 
direct small staff. Need 
good general office and 
computer skills, able to 
work competently in 
Word and Excel pro- 
grams. Excellent benefits 
Please fax resume to 
(847) 367-5506 



I.KSS^ Resauram .™, 

MjpJoln our onihuslaslic loam f* 
i* as en omployoo ol Lake Forosl 
Placo, a community ol 
Pfobylorian Homos. Wo currently 
havo Iho tallowing positions 
available: 

SERVERS 

* Part-Tlmo • 

Early ovonlng positions open 
lor Servers In our Health Caro 
Dining Services and Independent 
living area. Musi bo alio to work 
soma wookonds and holidays. 
Slnrllng times are nogoliablo. 
soma shifts will ond at 8.00p.m. 
PASTRY ASSISTANT 

• Full-Tlnw ■ 
Must bo able lo work soma 

wookonds and holidays. Primarily 
a day positions, but lloxibility Is 
noodod. Somo baking and pastry 
experience required. 

Excellent beneliis. Ploaso call 

for an appointmant, fax rosumo, 

or apply in person. 

LAKE FOREST PLACE 

Director of Dining Services 

1 100 Pembrldgo Drive 

Lako Forest, IL 60045 

Ph:B47-6(M-6495 

Fax: B47-G04-6498 

EOE 4 

A community of ^Y 



% 



'j5S§^ Preibylcrian Hamcl 






Production 

LEAD MATERIAL SUPPIY 

& SET-UP ASSISTANT 

Timbcrlino Lock, Lid. located in the 
far north subuibs has an exciting 
opportunity for a Material Supply 
and Set-up Assistant, who will also 
he re sponsible lor our quality and 
inventory control areas. Wo ate a 
U.S. based company very sucecsfiJiy 
competing in markets in Canada, 
Mexico, England, and Australia. 

This position will assist the 
production managers with day-today 
operations within Iho production 
area, sel-up work stations, maintain 
sufficient supplies, and perform 
quality control checks of finished 
goods. Qualified candidate will 
posses a high school diploma or 
equivalent plus specialized training 
and 2 years related experience. The 
use of a ruler, working math skills, and 
reading of simple prints are also 
essential. Bilingual English/Spanish 
a plus. 

We offer a competitive benefits 
package, salary commensurate with 
experience, and a 'can do* team 
environment. Qualified individuals 
please send your resume with salary 
history to lii@lakebii.com. 

Timberlina Lock Ltd. 

Attn: Ux Ctsarto 

915 Slmrwood Drive 

Lake Dluff. IL 60044 

Fax: 847-543-2107 

ao* m/f/d/v 



Sales 



The Green Advantage 



SALES 
REPRESENTATIVES 

WE'LL HELP YOU 
GROW YOUR CAREER 

EVERY 

STEP 

OF 

THE 



'WAY! 



B Competitive Base 
Sakty-S24J26K 

■ Excellent Bonus 
Structure 

■ Mcdical/DeriUl/Life 
&401(k) 

■ Furnished Leads 

■ Paid Training 

■ Advancement 
Opportunities 



' For more information 
oJlourJOBHOTUNE! 

24 hours a day 

7 days a wee Id 

888-227-8383 

at fax resume to fM7-680-B089 
call 847-680-8088 for directions 



15 Minutes 

from 

G urn eel 



S500 bantu 
for previous 
phone sales 
aperience! 



TrtUdREEH ChtraLawn' 

e.o.e.m/f/dVv 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-lime 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Full-time dental recep- 
tionist wanted for busy, 
quality-oriented Vernon 
Hills Dental practice. 1 
evening. No weekends. 
If you are self-motivated, 
enthusiastic and have 
good communication 
skills, please call 

(847)367-6410 



Teachers 
& Assistants 



For state-of-the-art 

child care center in 

Lincolnshire Corp. 

Center 

Call Kathy 

C847) 634-1982 



SUBSTITUTE 
DIRECTORY 

The following schools need 

substitutes on a continuing basis, please contact the 

names listed below for further information. 

Requirement - Bachelor's Degree 
& Substitute Certification 



Aptakistic - Tripp School District #102 
1231 Weiland Road, Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 

Contact: Peggy (847) 634-5338 

Decrf/ield School District #109 
517 Decrfield Road, Deerflclil, IL 60015 

Contact: Denisc DiClcmcnli x222 (847) 945-1844 

Grass Lake School District #36 
26177 W. Grass Lake Road, Anlioch, IL 60002 

Contact: Palti or Sue (847) 395-1550 

Grayslake Community High School, District #127 
400 N. Lake St., Grayslake, IL 60030 

Contact: Marilyn xl214 (847) 223-8621 

Grayslake School District #46 
625 N. Barron Blvd., Grayslake, IL 60030 

Contact: ]w Fabry xl 100 (847) 223-3650 

Gurnec School District #56 
Spaulding, 0'Plaine, & Viking Schools 
900 Kilboum Road, Gumec, 1L60031 

Contact: Sheila (847) 336-0800 

Hawthorn School District #73 

201 Hawthorn Parkway, Vernon Hills, IL 60061 

Contact: Sliari Keena. (847) 367-3279 

Lake Forest Elementary Schools 
95 W. Dcerpnth, Lake Forcsl, IL 60045 

Contact: Karen Allie (847) 604-7423 

Lake Villa School District #41 
131 McKinlcy, Lake Villa, IL 60046 

Contact: Kathy (847) 356-2385 

North Chicago Community Unit School District #187 
2000 Lewis Ave., North Chicago, IL60064 

Contact: Mona Armstrong (847) 689-8150 

Trevor Grade School District 
26325 Wilmot Road, Trevor, WI 53179 

Contact-Rhonda (262) 862-2356 

Woodland School District #50 

17370 Gages Lake Rd, Gages Lake, IL 60030 

Co/./rfc/.-Terry Lutz (847) 856-3605 



School Bus Driver 



We have a friendly 
working environment! 

Wages ranging from $12.78 - $17.11, 
guaranteed five hours per day. Excellent benefit 
package.Year 2000 u BIuebird"Transit-style buses. 
CDL license and Illinois bus permit preferred. 
Come join the Warren Blue Devil Team! 
Contact Tina M. Delabrc 
Director of Transportation 
Warren Township 
High School #121 
(847) 599-4787 




TTWCA ofi Lake County 

ENCOREplus Program 

Bilingual Outreach Specialist 



Clerical and outreach duties including typing letters, 
fillne, answering phones, contacting area businesses 
to set up outreach appointments, keeping in contact 
with program participants, attending health fairs and 
informational booths and translating educational 
materials. 

Background In social work or health education pre- 
ferred. Some computer skills useful. Full time with 
benefits. 

Send resume to YWCA of Lake County, ENCOREplus 
Program, 2 133 Delvidcrc Road.Waukcgan.IL 60085 or 
fax to (8*17) 662-4752. 

For more information contact Carol Carr, 
ENCOREplus Program Manager at (847) 782-3142 






Customer Service 

We're inviting all customer-service-oriented 
Individuals to check out the opportunities at 
One Step Ahead. We're a leading children's 
catalog and Internet company known for our 
great people and careers. To learn more, come 
to our 

OPEN HOUSE 

Friday, March 10th 

from 9am to 3pm 

75 Albrecht Dr. 

Lake Bluff, IL 

Oust South of Route 176) 

Full- and part-time schedules are available that 
offer day evening and weekend hours. We offer 
great salary potential, outstanding benefits and 
merchandise discounts. 

To RSVP or for directions, call: 847-615-2110. 
Or If unable to attend, mail resume to the 
above address or fax at:847-615-2162. 
email: dcaliendo@onestepahead.com 
www.onestepahead.com EOE 

OneStepAhead * 



GENERAL 
WAREHOUSE 



Wauconda based busi- 
ness has a full-time ware- 
house position available. 
Must be dependable & 
able to lift heavy Item. 
Salary plus benefits 
Call (847) 526-1380 



Warehouse 
workers neededll 

Must have experience ,n (,nc 

of the Following: 

Slilpplns/RccdvlnR 

Picking/Packing 

Electrical/Mechanical Assembly 

All positions arc In the 

northern suburbs, 

All day shift. S9-* 11 Air. 

Not accessible by 

public transportation. 

Please call Dart at 

(847) 808-5700 

ProStaff 

EOE 



EXECUTIVE PERSONAL ASSISTANT 

■ ' 4 4 

With 3-5 years experience needed. 






Qualified candidate must have strong orga- 
nizational skills; ability to manage multiple 
tasks at one time; flexibility and high level 
of motivation. Proficiency in Microsoft 
Office Suite is also necessary. The duties of 
this position will include general office 
tasks, light bookkeeping, personal errands, 
and travel planning. As the executive per- 
sonal assistant to the owners of the com- 
pany the candidate must be able to work 
with highly confidential material/informa- 
tion in a discrete manner. 



L 



We offer a 

competitive 

compensation 

and benefit 

package 

Including 

health, life, 

401-(K)and 

profit sharing 

plan. 

For consideration, 

please fax 

resume to 

(847) 526-6763 



K FIELD SERVICE^ 
TECHNICIAN 

$8.00/HR (Will Train) 

Qualifications: 
•Must lie 21 ' 
■ Good Driving Record 
• Pull & Part-Time 
We offer excellent benefits 
Including 4<HK, medical, 
dental & paid vacation. If 
you arc interested In 
becoming part of our team, 
please call Matt at (70H) 
532-9100 or fax resume to 
(708) 532-9289. 




EOE Drug Testing 
y Required 




\i >.-. 



?7^NWW>i<Wa'!% ■ 



MEDICAL OPPOR TUNIT8ES 




I Health Care 
AUDIOLOGIST 

]A general car-nosc-throat 
[practice in Gurnec has a 
(part time position with 
■flexible hours available Tor 
J .in IL licensed audlologtsi. 
Jt'rcvious experience Is 
{preferred. For more Infor- 
Imatlon regarding salary 
land benefits, call or send 
| resume to: 

Cindy Ball 

(847)360-4170 

VICTORY 

[MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

1324 N.Sheridan Rd. 

| Waukegan, IL 60085 

Fax: (847) 360-4230 

| equal opportunity employer 

nVI 



OPTICIAN 
OPTECH 

We are growing & we need 
Oplicians & Optechs 

FT/PT at our new 
Llbertyvllle location. 

Great hours, 

friendly environment, 

benefits available. 

Experience preferred but 

will train Ihe right person. 

Please call 

847-362-3444 

or 

fax resume to 

847-362-4672 

or 

stop by & fill out an 

application at 
307 S. Milwaukee Ave. 



Private Internal 
Medicine Office 



looking for 

M.A./Corpsman 

FT/PT help in our Buffalo 
Grove und/or Winnelkn Office. 
Busy telephones, EKGs, 
Plilcbolomy unci 
Administrative skills required. 
Dcnefils, flex hours and occa- 
sional Sal. Please cull or fax 
your resume between 9 & 1 1 

am. @ (847)013-9092 
or fux (847) 913-9220. EOE 



Hab Aides 
Nurses Aide 

All shifts. Flexible 

hours. 4-Bcd Group 

Home. Pleasant work 

environment. 

Competitive salary. 

Please apply at 

1504 1 6th St. 

North Chicago 

(847) 244-2312 

EOE 



C.N.A.s 



Our 113-bcd skilled nursing facility employs 

only high quality C.N.A.S. 
We offer excellent starting pay. $9.75/hr. + 

.75 extra on weekends ($1 an lir. shift 

differential on 11-7 shift) and top benefits 

to qualified applicants. 

Apply at; 

Care Centre of Wauconda 

176 Thomas Ct. 

Wauconda, IL 60084 

(847) 526-5551 Fax: (847) 526-0807 



CNA/AIDES 

Seeking 

CNA/AIDES 

to work In our 

Lake Zurich 

Intermediate 

Care Facility 

for 

Developmental^ 

Disabled Women. 

Full and Part time 

positions available, 

most shifts. 

Willing to train, 

experience not required. 

Contact Mt. St. Joseph 

847-438-5050 

******* 



.*■ 



QMRP/ 

Residential 

Service Director 

Small group homes 

looking for a QMIUrHils 

person must have a DA 

Degree In Human Services 

Held. Must have worked 

wflh MJI population for at 

least I yean Supervisory 

experience Is needed. 

Please send resume toi 

IS04 IOUiSL 

North Chicago. ILGOOG4 

or fox resume to 

047-473*3390 



ft 



i 



RN'S 
CARDIAC STEP 

DOWN 
STEP UP TO 

OUR Step Down! 

Trio Cardiac Step Down 
Unit a i Victory Memorial 
Hospital provides talented 
RNfc with an excotlent way 
lo grow In a dynamic, ultra 
modem environment. State- 
of-iho-on equipment end 
our "Quiet Zona" provide 
you with iho help you need 
lo bo efficient. We currently 
have full lime, part time and 
float positions available 
evenlnrjs end nights". 
Current IL license required, 
previous experience pre- 
ferred. 

We provide an excellent 
salary ond benefits. Ploaso 
apply In person or send/lax 
resume to: 

Cindy Ball 

Human Resources 

VICTORY MEMORIAL 

HOSPITAL 

1324 N. Sheridan Rd. 

Waukegan, IL 60005 

Fax: 647-360-4230 

email: 

humanrosourcosOiconnot.nct 

Equal opportunity employer 

mfl/ruV 



Medical Opportunities 

CN As 

A true sense of teamwork, 
support & camaraderie Is 
prominent at Provena 
Saint Thcrcsc Medical 
Center, a 300-bcd hospital 
serving the Lake County 
area, Full, part-time & per 
diem positions are avail- 
able in various areas for 
professionals with Illinois 
stale certification & at 
least 1 year of experience. 
We offer excellent com- 
pensation & exceptional 
benefits, such as compre- 
hensive insurance options, 
on-site day care & fitness 
center. Please forward your 
resume to: PROVENA 
Saint Theresc Medical 
Center, Attn: Mollc 
Klecbergcr - IIR DcpL, 
2615 Washington St., 
Waukegan, IL 600845. 
FAX; (847) 3fiO-9656. 
(eoc m/f/d/v) 

PROVENA 

Saint Therese 

Medical 

Center 




To place your medical 

opportunity here, call us 

at 847-223-8161 




February 25, 2000 



CLASSIFIED 









220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



EETiT 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



EEfiT 



jj Help Wanted 



Full-Time 



CUBE VAN DRIVERS 

REGULAR D/L REQUIRED 

GDI, A "CT B DRIVERS 

fjLOCAJL RUNS) MUST HAVE 

HAZ MAT & AIRBRAKES ENDORSEMENT 

AVAILABLE NOWIIII!!!!! 

APPLY IN PERSON 

K&R TRANSPORTATION, INC. 

3059 W. WASHINGTON ST. 

WAUKEGAN, IL 60085 



| Clerical Positions F * T i^ I 




rGmii Starter Positions . 

- * Will train 
AVAILABLE NOW 

Ap[)ty i,n I'tiMHi 


"1ST SHIFT I 


1 • BUUng Clerk 


2ND AND 3RD SHIFTSI 


r» Data Entry Clerks 
1 • Package Handlers 


K&R TUANSI'ORTATION 
3059 W. Wash In^ton. 



J anitor /Maintenance 



For Savanna RkJge ' 

A Brand New Luxury Apartment 

Gimmunity In Gumcc arra. 

Includes benefits. Some 

Experience Preferred. 

(847) 6406060 Ask for Hose. 



Watikegan, IL 



| ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 



[AD 

I Pharmaceutical co. in Lincolnshire 
I seeking Top-notch Admin. Asst 
Must be proficient in Word, Excel, & 
PowerPoint; $15-$18/hr 
I Call Tricia at (847) 520-7300 
I or fax (847) 465-2028 



ft 



Entry Level Reporter 

The Great Lakes Bulletin Is looking for someone with a 
passion for writing about the Naval Training Center Great 
Lakes.Thls full-time, entry level position will give the right 
candidate an opportunity to cover the fast-paced, exciting 

world of U.S. Navy training right here in Lake County. 

Previous experience with military base newspapers will be 

helpful to the candidate, hut is not required. 

It's not \asi a job, it's an adventure - let the Journey bcginl 

Please send or fax resume and cover letter to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Robert Wardc 

P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, a 60030 

FAX: (847) 223-8810 



TECHNICAL SERVICE COORDINATOR 



A manufacturer of food service equipment has an Immediate 
opening in our Technical Service dept Job duties include handling 
technical service calls, arranging for service in the held, depart- 
ment coordination work and backup for parts order entry. The 
ideal candidate will have at least one year experience in customer 
service, basic knowledge of electrical components, a good phone 
personality, the ability to diagnose problems over the phone, and 
be customer focused. Experience fa Geld service work is a plus. 
lAfe offer a salary commensurate with experience and a very good 
fringe benefit package. Vk arc a non-smoking facility. Send/fax 
resume or call Patrick Walker At 



Full or Part-time 



TEACHER 



needed for Spring Grove 
Preschool. Benefits Include 
health Ins., paid holidays and 
. vacation. Call Michelle: 
(815) 675-6333 



CARTER-HOFFMANN 

Sine t iMT, foodirrritt KpjipmnH thil it lirtnl 

847/362-5500 - oxt. 2344 
FAX: 847/367-8981 



Leasta^Assistant Manager 

For Savanna Ridge, A luxury 

Apartment Community In the 

Gumee area. Includes 

Benefits. Weekends a must. 

. Experience required. 

C847) 640-3060 

Ask for Rose. 

— « WWII 



■£ 



Maintenance Technicians 

Nichols Aluminum Lincolnshire an 150 9002 -certified 
leader In the processing of cold rolled aluminum sheet Is seek- 
ing qualified maintenance technicians. The qualifications 
include knowledge and proficiency In welding/gas cutting, 
hydraulics, pipe fitting, pumps, power transmission, lubrica- 
tion, rigging, shop machines - tools and equipment, basic elec- 
trical and pneumatic. 

Starting wage will be $18.28 for individuals successfully pass- 
ing the maintenance qualification test. Additional wages 
Include a production bonus shared by all shop employees, 
quarterly safety bonus, yearly attendance bonus and 3-2-2 
premium. 

An excellent benefit package Including: Group Health, Dental, 
and life, a 401-K plan which Includes a 6.5% contribution by 
the Company after one year and a stock purchase plan. ' 
Please send resume to: 

Nichols Aluminum 
200 Schelter Road 

Lincoln shircJL 60069 

Attn: Stan Whlteman 
E0EVM7F/H/V 



TRAVEL ADVISOR 



Lake Bluff AMEX rep agency seeks one 
more special leisure agent with SABRE 
experience and one APOLLO agent with 
experience. Monthly bonuses, medical, 
dental, 40 IK. Come join our growing 
company & great team of professionals. 

.Call Dawn at 
C84T) 234-0300 xlOO 




WATER DEPARTMENT 
CLASS B OPERATOR 

The Village of Wauconda (pop. 9000) seeks Water 
Department Class D Operator. Job requires main- 
tenance and repair functions on all water system 
production, storage, and distribution components. 
Assist in the maintenance of records and reporting 
pertaining to the department's activities. Assist 
other Public Works personnel with the perfor- 
mance of emergency operations and perform 
other tasks and assignments as required. Requires 
CDL or ability to acquire CDL within 120 days of 
hire. Starting pay rate $15.65 per hour with full 
; benefits. Job open until filled. 

Applications available at the Village Hall, 

101 N. Main, Wauconda, IL, 

We arc an Equal Opportunity Employer. 



JWEfiA STORE 

Payroll/Accounting Clerk 

High Volume Auto Dealership seeking an outgoing, 
self starter with payroll & acct. background. 
Knowledge of ADP computer system a plus. Must 
be able to work In a fast paced environment 
Monday through Friday. 
Call (847) 223-8651 Ext 3131, Vicky 
1000 E Belvldere, Grayslake, IL 



O MANPOWER at 




Allinnt 



Administrative Assistant 
Needed! 



m 





ARE YOU PERSISTENT, 

DEPENDABLE, OUTGOING, 

RESPONSIBLE & ORGANIZED? 

Lakeland Newspapers has the perfect career 

opportunity for you in our exciting sales 
department. This job involves sales calls out- 
side the office so a dependable car is necessary. 
We offer great benefits! 

• Salary plus Commission 

• Health Insurance 

• Dental Insurance 

• Disability & Ufe Insurance 

• A Matching 401 K Plan 

• Gas Allowance 

• Phone Reimbursement 

So if you're self-motivated, highly organized, 

and very personable, you're sure to be a 

success. Experience a plus, but will train Ihe 

right person. For an interview appointment call 

Dave Sherman 

Lakeland Newspapers 

(847) 223-8161 x 113 



High level professionals to 

support various managers. 

Need to be proficient'in MS Word, 

Excel, Power Point and Outlook. 

Jobs are both long and short term 

and are located in Deerfield. 

Pay is $12-$i6/hn depending on 

experience. 

Call Patrick at 847-564-1440 



?:, 



.''7> 



ACCOUNTS REGEIVABLE 
BILIJNG CI^ERK puxjL/Time 

Lakeland Publishers has an Immediate > 
position in our fast-paced Accounting Department 
for an Accounts Receivable Billing Clerk. You must 
be an energetic individual who is team focused, 
accurate, and enjoys working with numbers. 
Knowledge of computers helpful, but will train the 
tight person. 

We offer complete health benefits, a -ioi(k) plan 
with employer match, competitive salary, and 
friendly work environment Fax resume or call Jo 
Davis to be considered and set up an interview. 
(847) 223-81(51 xl73 
(847) 223-8810 Fax 
Lakeland Publishers, Inc. 
30 S. Whitney street 
Grayslake, IL 60030 



GENERAL OFFICE 

To$1Q/hr. Friendly 

co-workers 

welcome pitch-in 

attitude. Phone 

skills, light 

computer and good 

eye for detail. 

244-0016 or 

549-0016 

Superior Personnel 



GENERAL 
OFFICE 

Duties: Data Entry and 
Telephone Answering 

Will Train 

Full Time & Part time 

available 

DRIVER FOR 

LOCAL ERRANDS 

Monday thru Friday 

9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. 




Distribution Center 

21 21 Temple Drive 

(45 & Temple Drive) 

Libertyvillc 

Apply in person 



Come to 

The 



Servers.wanted to 

make some 

$REAL$ Money! 

Will Train 

Weekends 

Full-Time 

625 Rockland Rd. 

(Rt. 176) Lake Bluff 

N 



Rto 
43 



w 



Rib. 176 

s 



Rie. 

41 



• ADMINISTRATIVE 

• CLERICAL 

• GENERAL OFFICE 

Tilings are really happening al 
Medline, one of America's fastest 
growing providers of quality med- 
ical products & supplies, With plen- 
ty of success to go around, we're 
looking for Administrative 
Assistants & CleriraVGciuTil Office 
Support personnel al all skill levels. 
The quillty-orlenicd icara players 
tve seek should have strong office 
skills (I.e. typing, filing, computer, 
etc) along with good customer ser- 
vice abilities. 

In exchange for your talent & 
enthusiasm, we offer attractive 
salaries (commensurate wiili posi- 
tion & experience) and excellent 
bcnefJu. Please send resume to: 
Medline Industries, Inc., MR Dept 
CS. One Medline Place, Mundeldn, 
IL 60060-4486. Fac (847) 9*9- 
2109. EOEnVtAW 




.v^-vs^" 



Help Wan ted 
: Full-Time 



CUSTOMER SERVICE 
REPRESENTATIVE 



Exp.P&CCSR 
w/personal insurance 

background. 

Call (847) 295-3030 

Ask for Karen or 

George 



I Safety 

A community college seeks Individu- 
al] for the following positions: 
CAMPUS SAFETY OFFICER 

Lakesfiorc 
With an Associate s Degree In 
Criminal Justice or related Odd, 
2 years of public contact work, a 
valid drivers license and exceHent 
communication skills (o maintain 
Ihe safety and security of the cam- 
pus. 

CAMPUS SAFETY ASSOCIATE 

3rd SHIFT 
Responsible person needed to 
maintain the safety and security of 
campus. A high school diploma or 
GED, 2 yrs. of public contact, a valid 
driven license and good communi- 
cation skills are required. 
Submit application, indicating area 

of interest, i o 1 1 R, College of Lake 

County, 19351 W. Washington SL, 
Grayslake, IL 60030-1 198 or fax to 

847-2234824 by March 6, 2000. 

http://www.dcccil.us 

equal opportunity employer 

1M. 



Restaurant 
Grand Opening! 

Pancra Bread currently 
has an opportunity at 
our newest bakery-cafe 
In Libertyvillc for a: 

Day-Shift 
Cashier 

This position is perfect 
for mothers, and offers: 

• Flexible hours, 
Monday - Friday 

• A fun atmosphere 

• An excellent starting 
salary 

• Growth potential 
tntcrc5tcd candidates 

should apply In person 
or call (847) 362-9840. 

EOE 



*ENTRY IJEVEL* 1 

REPORTER 

Lakeland Newspapers is 
looking for someone with 
a passion for journalism. 
This full-time enlry level 
position will give the right 
candidate a chance to get 
his or her foot In the door 

as a local community 

journalist, covering the full 

gamut of stories that 

happen weekly in 

Lake County villages. 

Please send or FAX 

resume with cover letter to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Robert Warde 

P.O. Box 268 

Grayslake, Illinois 

60030 

FAX: (847) 223-8810 

2 SI 




Business 
Opportunities 



5 WORDS + 13 MILLION 
HOMES = GREAT RE- 
SULTS. You can market your 
product to 13 million house- 
holds throughout North Ameri- 
ca by placing your classified 
ad In more than 800 suburban 
newspspers, like this one for 
only $895. One phone call, 
one Invoice, one low payment 
Is all It takes. Call the Subur- 
ban Classified Advertising Nat- 
work fax-on-demand service 
000-356-2061 or 312-644- 
6610 X4731 to speak with 
sales coordinator. 

ATTENTION 
WORK FROM HOME 

Our children come to the 

office every day, 

Earn an extra" 

S500/S1, 500 month P/T. 

$2,000/$6,500 Ffl". 

Free booklet 

920-730-6020 

DATA ENTRY ON YOUR 
PC: Legal judgement notices 
PT/FT. www.avialhome.com 
or SASE to AVI, PMB 105 
7231 Boulder Ave., Highland, 
Ca. 92346-2232 (SCA Net- 
work), 




Business 
Opportuniles 



^ 



EASY WORK 
AT HOME 

Send s.a,s.e. 

and $5.00 to: 

R.A.L 

5303 N. Highland Dr. 

McHenry, IL 60050 



GARDEN GIFTS 
You can oarn $20-540 

an hour as an 
Independent Consultant 
with Wildflowers Garden 
Party, Inc., a new Home 

Party Company. 

Sell beautifully designed, 

hard-to-flnd garden 

products. 

Year-round catalogs. 

Fun and rewarding! 

Call (B47) 049-7375: 

INTERNATIONAL COMPANY 

JUST STARTED DOING 

BUSINESS IN INDIA 

Wanted: bilingual speaking. 

For Information call- phone # 

for appt.- 847-872-3580 

Email: herbalgar@spry- 

net.com 



NEW AUTOMATED HOME 
business (patent pending) un- 
limited income. No selling. 
Weekly checks. $168 Initial 
cost. Internet required. Tre- 
mendous tax benefits. 800- 
621-4889 complete recorded 
presentation. (SCA Network). 

TIRED OF WORKING 
FOR SOMEONE ELSE? 

Home-based business. 

Public Utility Industry. 

Call 1-888-548-8873 

code 19, or 

www.excel ir.com/thesauers. 



240 


childcare 



WAUCONDA, CHILD CARE 
NEEDED In my home or 
yours, 10:30am-5:30pm, 
Monday-Tuesday-Thursday- 
Friday, Wednesday 8:30am- 
5:30pm. 1-preschooer, 2- 
schoolaged. 

847-487-2101. 

INFANT CARE OVER- 
NIGHT or Day, Infant CPR 
Certified. Excellent references. 
(847) 573-0745, cell (847) 
791-6227. 

ISLAND LAKE MOM 
WrTH 8yrs. child care experi- 
ence has full-time openings, 
Fun activities, story time, field 
trips. Breakfast, lunch and 
snacks included. Reasonable 
rates. (847) 487-^074. 

ISLAND LAKE SHAN- 
NON'S Busy Bee's Home 
Based Daycare, establishing 
progressive discovery play 
group for 1yr. olds, only 3 full- 
time openings. If you're a par- 
ent looking for something dif- 
ferent for your Busy Bee, call 
Shannon. (847) 487-7482. 

ISLAND LAKE AREA, 
DEGREED MOTKE of 1, 
looking to provide pre-school 
enriched child care in my 
home, 8-1/2yrs. professional 
experience, Including pro- 
gram management. CPR- 
First Aide, all ages. Call for 
program description. 

(815) 759-0843. 



250 



School/Instruction 



PIANO LESSONS 

IN MY LAKE VILLA HOME 

OPENINGS 

Now for students 

6yrs. to adult. 

Over 25yrs. experience. 

REASONABLE RATES. 

(847) 356-2780. 

TUTORING SERVICE 

LICENSED TEACHER 

20YRS. EXPERIENCE. 

All ages welcome. 

Reading, writing and 

comprehension. 

Very reasonable rates. 

Every child Is precious and 

every child should read. 

Ms. Jordan. (847) 473-3686. 



301 


Antiques 



JUKE BOX AMI, 1954. 
All 120 original records, 
excellent condition, not 
restored, needs new needle. 
Asking $1200. 
Call 262-633-4671 



304 


Appliances 



KENMORE HEAVY DUTY 
washer, $100. 
Stationary bike, Pro Form 
aerobics trainer, $25. 
847-808-9620 








C20 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



314 


Building Materials 



ATTENTION ROOFERS 

AND SIDERS Brand new 
Tapco Maximum Pot-o- 
Bender II, 10ft.6in„ 1/2 price, 
5950.(847)497-9671. 

OAK FLOORING 

about 60' sq. of 3/4" 

preflntshed 

micro-beveled wood flooring 

various widths & lengths. 

847-362-0685 

STEEL BUILDINGS SALE: 
40x60x14, $8,148. 50x75x14, 
$11,019. 50x100x16, 

$14,196. 60x100x16, $16,193. 
Mini-storage buildings. 

40x160, 32 units, $16,534. 
Free brochures, www.senlinel- 
buildings.com, Sentinel Build- 
ings, 800-327-0790. Exten- 
sion 79. 




Business 
* Office Equipment 



ADVANCED PANASONIC 
DIGITAL BUSINESS 

PHONE SYSTEM. 18 MUL- 
TI-LINE PHONES, 1-ro- 
ceptlonlst call director 
and system box. This ex- 
pandable system, as is, can 
handle 8 incoming trunks, has 
many special features and is 
easy to use. Each phone has 
20 programmable function 
keys, plus 9 special function 
keys. Call Dawn Wright at 
(847) 548-4451 for more In- 
formation. 



DISPLAY CAROUSELS 
(15) 4-1/2FT. high, like nw, 
slals for hooks, gray, 5100/ea. 
(847) 726-0162. 



START A HOME BUSI- 
NESS, print on nearly any- 
Ihing, enjoyable, high profil 
margin. Equipment, $1,995. 
(847) 526-1291 leave mes- 
sage. 



320 



Electronics 
Computers 



GET PAID 
TOSURFTHEWEBI 

If you ever surf the web, then 

why not get paid for it? I just 

received my first check 

You can too. 

It's 100% FREE. 

Check itoutl 

Just go to: 

www.alladvantage.com. 

When you sign up use the 

reference code DXX-947. 



INTERNET ACCESS 

As low as $11.95 per 
month. Sell your items on 
the webl It's easy, free, & 
it works! 

Mention this ad and re- 
ceive 5 FREE e-mail 
accounts. Call for details. 
(847) 223-8199 



STEREO KENWOOD 

MODEL 11, built in amp, 
stage speakers, Cerwln 
Vegas with built In breakers. 
Floor speakers, Sanyo, like 
new. (262) 697-4053. 



330 



Garage 
Rummage Sale 



MOVING SALE 

Ethan Allen hutch $350. 

Triple dresser & chest $250. 

Porch glass table 

& chairs $150, 

Hide a bed S75. 

Assorted tables & lamps. 

847-395-7457 

""AFTER YOU'VE HAD YOUR 
BIG SALE, and there is still 
things that just did not go.... 
^Call us at LAKELAND News- 
papers and run it under the 
■FREE or Giveaways* classi- 
fied column. FREE ADS are 
NO CHARGEI (847) 

223-8161, ext. 140, 




16YR. GRADE TENN. 
WALKER MARE, 15.1H, red 
'bay, great looks, good gait. 
Used as brood mare. Inlmed. 
rider req. $1,200/best. (847) 
356-3098 after 6pm. 

SADDLE SHOP HORSE 

trailers, Western/English, 
new/used. Buy, sell, trade. The 
-Corral, Sullivan, Wisconsin. 
(4141593-8048. 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



ANTIQUE POCKET BIL- 
LIARD TABLE (Brunswick Ar- 
cade), . 4-1/2lt.x9ft., 1-1/2in. 
slate top. $9,500/best reason- 
abla offer. (847) 662-0943. 

BEDROOM FURNITURE, 
VERY contemporary head- 
board, flanking attachable 
nlghtslands, huge entertain- 
ment piece with matching 
desk, $1,500. Ideal for teenag- 
ers. Must disassemble, (847) 
438-7474. 

BRASS & OAK oval kitchen 
set W/leaf 4 lilt chairs 
W/arms $250. Call after 3pm. 
847-548-5968 

BRASS BED WITH frame & 

queen orthopedic 
mattress set. 

New, never used.$275.00 
Delivery available 
847-236-0032 

BRASS BED WITH frame & 
queen orthopedic 
mattress set. 
New, never used. $275. 00 
Delivery available 
. 847-236-0032 

CHEST OF DRAWERS, 

twin headboard, frame and 
box spring. White with flowers 
and natural accents, $250. 
Barbie Childrens playhouse, 
S100. (847) 543-0744. 

DINING AND DINETTE 
SETS, assorted desks and as- 
sorted light fixtures, grandfa- 
ther clock, armoires and as- 
sorted couches with love- 
seats. By owner. (847) 
43S-6997. 

ELEVEN PIECE THOMAS- 
VILLE DININGROOM SET. 
great shape, Sl,075/besl. 
(847) 599-9089, 

EVERYTHING MUST GO. 

TV's/VCR's/Satellite dish/cord- 
less phones/smalt kitchen ap- 
pliances. Livingroam/bed- 
room/diningroom sets. Mat- 
tresses/area rugs. Office furni- 
ture/computers and more, For 
more info/directions call (847) 
336-2312. 

HOME FURNISHINGS, CAR- 
PETING, appliances, much 
much more. Buy direct from 
over BOO name brand manu- 
facturers at cost, no middle 
. man, no mark-ups. Join ovor 
600,000 members of our na- 
tionwide buyers club 
www.ucc-gurnee.com or 

847-265-1105 

>n>imuiiiiii i iiiiiim > 

GIANT $1,000,000 

STORE WIDE 

FURNITURE SALE 

•Deluxe 3-plece sofa, love, 

chair, $190. 

*3-piece 100% Italian 

Leather sola/loveseat and 

chair, $1,290. 

'Black velvet tieclional, $290. 

"Italian lacquer bedroom set, 

$790. 
" italbr. mahogany bedroom 

set $990. 

'Queen pillow top mattress 

set, deluxe $250. 

* King size mattress set, 

deluxe, $350. 

'Deluxe queen mattress set, 

$150. 
*7-piece cherry dininlgroom 

set, $450. 

*Bc-nchcralt Italian leather 

sectional, with 2-recliners and 

sleeper, S1 ,895. 

'Italian leather sofa sleeper, 

$695. 

*3 Piece Leather set, 

$895. 
'Italian Leather green 

sectional, $1 .495. 
'Bone pearl ized leather 
sectional, by Benchcrafl, 

$1,695. 

•Italian Imported 10piece 

mahogany diningroorn set, 

was $4,500, now $1 ,995. 

* Italian marble diningroorn 

set, with chairs. $1,095. 

FACTORY CLOSE OUTS: 

Twin size mattress set, 

$69.95. 

•Full size $79,95, 

'Queen size $99.95. 

•Butcher block diningroorn set 

$100. 

'Black metal futon wilh 

mattress, S125. 

*3-piece cocktail table sel, 

$79.95 

'Childrens computer 

desk, oak finish, 

$69.95. 

Imported rugs, art, stalues, 

and much more. 

Celebrating our 

49th. Year. 

Hope to see you soon. 

WHOLESALE TO YOU 

BEST PRICES 

SHELDON CORD 

PRODUCTS 

2201 W. Devon, Chicago. 

Open 7 days 

We carry Thousands of name 

brand furniture, items, at 

super low prices. 

(773) 973-7070. 



340 



Household 
Goods/ Furnilurc 



MOVING SALE 

Bedroom furniture, 

chairs, lamps, dehumidlfiers, 

mlsc Items. 
847-362-0685 

Organ-Baldwin, Fantasia. 2 
manual 5 oct. 2 oct. pedal 
brd, price negotiable, 
262-634-0357 eves. 
Norltake dishes, setting of 
12, mint condilion. 

ROCKER BENTWOOD, 

$25. Two dressers, $15/ea. 
Children's cabinet, $25, Wing 
back chair, $75. (262) 
B62-740B. 




GARDEN TRACTOR, 

John Deere. Snowblower, 

extra parts, in excellent 

condition. 

After 11am 

262-694-5944 



349 


Clothing 



DARK MINK JACKET. Excel- 
lent quality and cndlllon. 
Vault kept, $2,000 value, 
asking $750. (262) 
534-7748. 

WEDDING DRESS 

BRAND new, custom made 

by Bridal Shop, ivory and 

lace, size 16. 

847-740-4260 

WOMEN'S SILVER SAGA 
FOX, size small, car coat 
length. Very good condition, 
Worn 4 limes. Asking $125. 
Call (815) 363-5330. 




"KISS YOUR CABLE GOOD- 
BYE" Only $69 includes 18" 
dish system. 40 channels; 
SI 9.98 /Mo. Toll-free 1-888- 
4836, Won't be undersoldl 
Money-back guarantee. 

FEDEX Delivery! 

19B5 Rolnken 

17 1/2' Bowrlder, 2.5 liter 
Chevy block. OMC I/O. 
$1,750. 

70 gallon Swordlish Aquari- 
um, glass top, double lights, 
brand new, $200. GE range 
top hood with -light and vent 
fans, never used, brand new, 
$50. 

Quoensizo Waterbed, stan- 
dard shelf headboard, com- 
plete with mattress, liner and 
heater. $75 or best offers. 
847-526-4839 

CARS $100, $500 Police 
impounds, Hondas, Toyotas, 
Chev^s. Jeeps and Sport Utili- 
ties. CALL NOW 1-800-730- 
7772 ext. 3050. (SCA Net- 
work). 

DELL COMPUTERS ... Fac- 
tory direct . $0 down Low 
monthly payments. Pentium 
111-600 available, resolved 
credit problems OKI Call by 
Feb. 4 for free printer. OMC 
B00-477-9016CodeKN05 

HOT TUB BUYERS; buy 
from manufacturer, Save 
$1000. lo $1500, Prices start 
at $1995. FREE VIDEO, 
price list 1-800-869-0460. 
www.goodlilespa.com 

MOTIVATIONAL CAS- 
SETTES, excellent condilion. 
Over $500 value. Best offer. 
(847) 516-3425. 

STARTING LINE-UPS 

FIGURINES 

Sold Separately or Togelherll 

Baseball, Football, Hockey, 

eel... 

847-249-1183 

UNIQUE TAPE 

RECORDERS, runs lOhrs. 
Kerosene heater, Bug zap- 
pers, (847) 223-2085. 



WOLFF TANNING BEDS. 

TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT 
and SAVEI Commercial/home 
units from $199. Low monlhly 
payments. FREE color cata- 
log. Call today 1-800-842- 
1310. 



354 



Medical Equip 
Supplies 



DIABETIC? DID YOU know 

that Medicare pays for diabe- 
tic testing supplies whethor on 
insulin or not? Call today for 
free info. Satisfaction guar- 
anteed. 1-800-843-7038 (SCA 
Network). 

FREE DIABETIC MONI- 
TORING SUPPLIES for Medi- 
care & Illinois Medicaid pa- 
tients on Insulin or oral medi- 
cation. Please call 800-643- 
2856 to see if you qualify. 



354 



Medical 

Equip/Supplies 



MEDICARE RECIPIENTS 
USING a NEBULIZER MA- 
CHINE! STOP paying full price 
for Albuterol, Atrovent, etc, so- 
lutions. MEDICARE will pay for 
them. We bill Medicare for you 
and ship directly to your door. 
MED-A-SAVE 1-800-538- 
9849 ext. 17J. 



358 



Musical 
Instruments 



TKO 4-plece drum set with 
cymbals, seat, $300/best. In- 
struments best for 8-1 2yr. old. 
(847)263-1646. 

PLAYER PIANO 

Non-working, 
wanted for restoration. 

Call Tony 
847-249-2142 

THOMAS ORGAN, 

WORKS good, S2S0/best. 
(847) 838-9490. 



360 



Pels & Supplies 



ANIMAL LOVER WILL sit 
for your pet while you are on 
vacation and/or walk & feed 
your pet dally. (847) 
573-0745, cell (847) 791- 
8227. 

AUSTRALIAN CATTLE DOG, 
part Dingo, part Dalmatians 
& pari Collie. Very loyal & 
dependable. Needs lots of 
room, $150 or best offer. 
262-637-4244 

BRITTANY AKC, great hunt- 
er or family dog, orange/liver, 
$400. (262) 7S1-1974 

COLLIES AKC MALES, 

sable and white, 8/weeks, top 
quality, healthy, eye check, 
$350-1-. (847)526-1165. 

DOG SITTING 

IN MY HOME. 

State licensed. 

Reasonable Rates. 

Call Florence (847) 966-6319. 

GET HOOK, ROUND, tape- 
worms with rotational worm- 
ing, Use Happy Jack Tape- 
worm Tablets. Tablets In rota- 
tion with Happy Jack Liqul- 
Victl Feed and Hardware 
(www.happyjacki nc.com 

GOLDEN RETRIEVER 

PUPS AKC. parents OFA, 3- 
females, 2-males, 7/weeks, 
shots and wormed, $400. Mc- 
Henry (815) 385-6618. 

TWO GERBILLS COM- 
PLETE with colorful plastic 
cage, all accessories and 
food. $60. (847)263-1646. 




TOW MOTOR FORKLIFT, 

gasoline. Needs tune-up. 
Runs & operates OK. Asking 
S1,000/besl offer. Call & ask 
for Ed or leave message. 
(B15) 385-6757 




Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or 
Parts. Also JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coke Machines. 
Paying CASHI Call 
(630)985-2742. 

WANTED TO BUY 1-10 
acres near Ill/Wise, border, to 
build storage building. Ask for 
Jared (414) 862-2517. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



♦FORECLOSED 

HOMES * 

************ * **** 

LOW OR $0 DOWN 

Gov't & Bank Repos 

being sold nowl 

Financing available! 

Local listings. 

1-800-501-1777, 

ext. 9203 



65TH ST. 516, 2 unit, 2-bed- 
rooms each, with diningroorn. 
No Realtors. $99,500. (414) 
657-5801. . 

RACINE 8-ROOM HOME 
FOR SALE, 2-bBdrooms, liv- 
Ingroom, diningroorn, bath- 
room, enclosed porch, fenced- 
in yard, $54,000. (262) 
634-2048, 

ADAMS, WISCONSIN, 

BEAUTIFUL HOME, 4-bed- 
room, 2-bath, 1 level, easy 
access. Family, daycare or 
group home. 1-acre enclosed 
lot. $85,000. (60S) 764-1550. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



ANTIOCH 

LOON LAKE/unincorporated 
Antloch township home 
(2,550 sq.1t.) w/lake rights 
on 1-1/2 acres; 3 bedrooms, 
2-1/2 baths, large kitchen, 
family room, formal dining 
room, living room, 2-car 
garage, gazebo w/jacuzzl. 
1 2' X 1 6' storage shed. 
All kitchen appliances stay. 
Call for appt. or 
leave message: 
847-838-2815 
a must see @$232,500 

BURLINGTON TOWN- 
HOUSE 2-UNITS at 
l,850sq,ft. each. 3-bedrooms, 
2.5 baths, 2-car attached ga- 
rages, private wooded rear 
yard, will sell one or both. 
S112,000/ea. (414) 
763-6365. 

BY OWNER ROOMY 

4+bedfooms. 1.5 baths, near 
Eagle Lake. Large triple lot. 4- 
car heated garage. Low main- 
tenance. $146,000. 24633 Wit- 
son St., Kansasville, Wise. Call 
for showing. (262) 878-0253. 

CRIVITZ, WISCONSIN, 
GREAT GET AWAY. 7 acres 
on the Pesligo River with 2- 
homes. Main house Is a 
fully furnished, fully function- 
ing log home. 3-bedrooms, 1- 
balh, livingroom/dlnlngroom, 
kitchen, enclosed porch that 
faces the river. Guest house 
has 2-bedrooms, wilh living- 
room. Both homes run off 
generator In garage and pro- 
pane (no electricity), but has 
phone service. Interested 
buyers only $132,900. (847) 
356-8363. 

DIAMOND LAKE LAKE- 
FRONT 4-bedroom, 2.5 bath 
home. Many special features. 
Four season recreation. Price 
reduced $369,900. (847) 
566-7768. 

ELK GROVE BY OWNER 5- 
bedrooms, 2-1/2 baths, living- 
room, diningroorn, familyroom 
wilh fireplace, $259,900. (847) 
524-2730, " 

F.S.B.O. EXECUTIVE 
RANCH, BIG ST. GERMAIN 
Lake. Vilas Cty. Wi„ $495M, 
200' shoreline, 2400sq.ft. 
home. Write for details: P.O. 
Box 97. SI. Germain, Wl. (715) 
542-3345, FAX (715) 542- 
4345. 

PLEASANT PRAIRIE, WIS- 
CONSIN, FOR SALE BY 
OWNER 2-bedroom, 1-1/4 
bath ranch wilh 2-car at- 
tached garage, located on 4 
acres wilh 3,000+pole barn, 
on Old Greenbay Rd. Easy 
access to 1-94 & Hwy. 31. 
Asking $215,000. 
(414) 684-0232 after 5pm 

FOR SALE BY OWNER 
Won't find anything like Itl 
Beautiful 3-bedroom, 3-bath 
Iri-levei with 3-car attached 
garage. Fully landscaped yard 
on oversized lot backing up to 
wooded area. Oversized 2 
level deck with screened gaze- 
bo (great for entertaining). 
Large livingroom/dlnlngroom 
combo and eat-In kitchen with 
cathedral ceilings. Large fami- 
lyroom with fireplace, large 
bedrooms, plenty of storage 
space. Miilburn School District. 
Must see. $209,000. (847) 
356-3583. 

RICHMOND FOUR BED- 
ROOM RANCH, 2-full baths. 
1-1/4 acres, must see. 
$195,900. All newly romo- 
deled. (815) 675-6282. 

FOX LAKE 2-STORY, 3- 
bedrooms, 2-balhs, 2-1/2 ga- 
rage, workroom, lake access, 
$129,900. Extra lot available. 
(847) 587-0925. 



FOX LAKE 4-BEDROOM 

home, Nice, newly remodeled 
4-bedroom home, 1-1/2 
baths, full finished basement, 
garage with Florida room, 
healed pool with big deck, 
$139,900. OPEN HOUSE 
SUNDAY 10AM-2PM. (847) 
587-1448. 



FOX LAKE WATERFRONT 
HOUSE 2-bedroom cedar 
sided house, 1-balh, newer re- 
modeled gas forced air with 
central air, city sewer and wa- 
ter, 1-1/2 car heated garage, 
blacktop drive, fenced yard, 
12x12 shed, deck, seawall 
and pier, $144,900. (847) 
497-3338. 



GAGES LAKE 3-BED- 
ROOMS, remodeled bath, no 
garage, no basement, newer 
roof, newer siding, lake rights, 
asking $110,000. (847) 
548-6573. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



3 



Gov't Foreclosures 
'Sale 

Waukogon, ZIon.Round Lake, 

McHertry & other areas. 

From $52,000 & up! 

Low down/make ofietl . 

Western Realty 

1-630-495-6100 



GRAYSLAKE 

3 Bedroom ranch! 

Was originally $129,900 

REDUCED 10K 

FOR QUICK SALE. 

ONLY $119,900 

Call tor details 

847-548-0395 

GRAYSLAKE BY OWNER 

Immaculate 2yr. old, 
2,870sq.ft., 4-bedroom, 2.5 
bath, on beautiful wooded lot. 
Enormous master w/sltllng- 
room and many other up- 
grades. $244,800. Must see. 
(847)543-9776. 

GREEN OAKS / LIBERTY- 
VILLE FOR SALE BY 
OWNER 

New home built In Sept. 
1999. 

4 Bedroom 2.5 bath , den, liv- 
ing room Dining Room, Fami- 
ly Room, full look out base- 
ment. 2 Car garage 1/3 acre 
located In Brookhaven Sub- 
division. 
$340,000. 
DAYS 312-554-5151 
EVEN&WEKND.S 
647-367-7455 

GURNEE 2-STORY ALL 

brick and stucco, 2-car at- 
tached garage, 5-bedrooms, 
4-balhs, familyroom, formal di- 
ningroorn, oak staircase and 
trim, 2 masonry fireplaces, 
laundryroom, full basement. 
Very attractive home in nice lo- 
cation, $335,000. (847) 
623-2870. 

GURNEE Adorable 1/2 acre 
wooded, mature perennials, 
low taxes, 3-bedrooms, 2- 
baths, 2-1/2 detached garage, 
$174,750. (847) 244-3422, 

HOME FORECLOSURES 
NO MONEY DOWNl NO 
CREDIT NEEDED! TAKEO- 
VER VERY LOW PAYMENTS. 
1-800-355-0024 ext. 8593. 
(SCA Network). 

HOMES FROM $5,000 

Foreclosed and repossessed. 

No or low down payment. 

Credit trouble O.K. 

For current listings call 

1-800-311-5048 

X6107. 

WEST ANTIOCH, HOUSE 
FOR SALE BY OWNER 2- 

bedroom, ceramic tile bath, 
livingroom, kitchen, en- 
closed rear room, hot water 
heal, California closet In- 
"'sorts In large closets, heated 
and A/C 2-1/2 car garage, al- 
most 2/3 acre, shed in back. 
Allowance for Interior deco- 
rating. Fold down stairs lead- 
ing lo attic storage. Low tax- 
es. MUST SELLI 
$99,000/best. 

(414) 862-9662. 

JOHNSBURG 3-BED- 

ROOM RANCH, 1-bath, full 
finished walk-out basement, 
deck, wooded neighborhood, 
$118,900. (847)497-9523. 



KENOSHA, WISC. 

RANCH, 3-bedrooms, 1-1/2 
baths, partially finished base- 
ment wilh workshop, fenced 
backyard, 1-1/2 detached ga- 
rage wilh attached shed, 

$109,500. (414) 942-1423. 



LAKE & MCHENRY & 
COOK CO. Free list of 
FHA/VA/Bank Foreclosures! 
Low down payments, Coldwell 
Banker (847) 222-6661. Se 
Hablo Espanol. 



LAKE VILLA 3-BED- 

ROOM, 2-bath quad level on 
2-lols, 2-car garage, C/A. fire- 
place, above ground pool, 
room off dock with hot tub, lak- 
erights to Chain. Located on 
Rt. 59. One year home warran- 
ty included. Motivated Seller! 
Reduced! $161,900. (847) 
356-8363. 



LAKE VILLA 3-BEDROOM 

ranch with hardwood floors, 
ceramic tile bath, 2.5 de- 
tached car garage, lot size 
125x150, $128,000, Call for 
more info. (847) 356-0377. 

LAKE VILLA 5-BED- 
ROOMS, 2-story, basement 
and garage, $142,900. 
Remax Grand (847) 
587-8200 ask for Sue. 



February 25, 2000 



500 



Homes For Sale 



! 



LAKE VILLA- Gray slake 
schools. Former mode!, nice 
yard, close lo shopplng/Me- 
tra. Spacious 4BR, 3BA, 
vaulted ceilings, large eat-in 
kitchen, sunny. Great neigh- 
borhood. Immediate occu- 
pancy. 

$184,900 
Days 847-951-2708 
Eves 847-746-0637 

LAKELAND IS OPEN 

24 HOURS 

If you need to place an ad in 

Classified, call us at 

(847)223-8161 ext. 140 

and leave a message. 

We will get back to you by the 

next business day. Or you can 

fax our 24-hour fax line at 

(847) 223-2691. 

LAKEVIEW ON DOUBLE 
LOT In Paddock Lake, Wise. 
Enjoy privacy In this 1600sq.ft. 
house surrounded by dead 
end streets and seasonal 
neighbors. 3-large bedrooms, 
1-1/2 baths and a fireplace) 
Roofs and 2 stage furnace are 
3yrs. new. Motivated sellers, 
priced to go fast. Call Cindy for 
appointment (847) 650-3452 
or (847) 740-0007. 



LINDENHURST FOR 

SALE BY OWNER, raised 
ranch, 4-bedrooms, 2-full 
baths, 2-1/2 car detached 
HEATED garage, enough 
room for 2-cars and a com, 
oak floors, crown molding, 
large deck, C/A. B.J, Hooper 
School/Grayslake High 

School. $159,900. Shown by 
appointment (847) 356-3546. 

LINDENHURST LAKE- 

FRONT PROPERTY NEW 
CONSTRUCTION CUS- 

TOM BUILT HOME 4-bed- 
room, full basement, formal 
living and diningroorn, family- 
room with fireplace, large 
kitchen with Island, master 
suite features whirlpool tub 
and cathedral celling, 2-story 
foyer, hardwood floors, 9fl. 
ceilings, close to forest pre- 
serve, $329,000. (847) 
356-0962. 



MCHENRY- FOR SALE BY 
OWNER Beautiful 2-story 
home, 4-bedrooms, ,2.5 
balhs, 3+ car garage on 1- 
1/2 acres. Cathedral ceil- 
ings, master suite, cedar 
decks, C/A, large gourmet 
kitchen, Many more up- 
grades, too much to list: A 
MUST SEE. Near Chain of 
Lakes and Rl. 12 for easy 
commuting. 

(815) 385-8468. 



-I Ml 



MUNDELEIN FOR SALE 
BY OWNER, 214 N. Green- 
view Dr., maintenance free 3- 
bedroom, 1-1/2 bath ranch, 
fenced yard back to park, 2- 
car garage, central air, cus- 
tom blinds and newer wind- 
ows throughout, $136,900. 
Call for appointment (847) 
566-6927. 



MUNDELEIN 

OPEN HOUSE 

SUN. 1-4 

425 N. Fairlawn 

(Midlothian & Hawley) 

4BR, 1.1 BA, 

$165,000 

(847) 566-4258 

NEAR GURNEE, ILLINOIS 
BY OWNER Immaculate 4- 
bedroom, 2.5 bath, loft, base- 
ment, bar, fireplace, C/A, 
deck, fenced rear. $198,000, 
$12,000 below market. (847) 
816-3798. Realtor gels In July. 
Possible ownerfinancing. 

NEW CONDO, 1ST floor, 2 
bedrooms, 2 balhs, 1 car ga- 
rage, patio, fireplace, ap- 
pliances, Round Lake 
Beach, $105,000. 
847-546-4705 

OAKWOOD KNOLLS ANTI- 
OCH Great starter home for a 
young family. 3-bedroom 
ranch In established, quiet 
neighborhood of Antloch, 1- 
1/4 bath, screened-ln porch, a 
nice sized kitchen, new wood 
floor, and a beautiful wood 
slove all make for a nice cozy 
feel. The 2-1/2 car detached 
garago, lonced backyard and 
a full basement give this home 
lots of room for you to grow 
Into. Walk to beach at Cross 
Lake with playground and 
swimming, lots of kids at ptay 
fn this neighborhood, great 
family atmosphere. Priced for 
quick sale @ $137,500 this 
one won't last long... (847) 
838-3510. 



tjyJ 



February '25, 2000 




CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / C2 1 




500 



Homes For Sale 



PELL LAKE, WISCONSIN 
Only 5 minutes to Illinois bor ; 
dor, beautifully landscaped, 
1,500sq.fl., '3-bedroom, 1 i 1/2 
bath, raised rach, In very quiet 
neighborhood of - newer 
homes. 6/yr. old home 
features a hobbyists 26x32 
dream garage, fully healed, 
dry walled and insulated, city 
water and sewer all connect- 
ed, price reduced to $129,900. 
Motivated. (414) 279-5986. 

LAKE VILLA PRESTEGt- 
OUS CHESNEY SHORES 
ieoOsq.lt. ranch with large 
room sizes. 3-bedrooms, 2-fuil 
baths (updated), L-shaped 
greatroom, famllyroom with 
Lannon Stone fireplace, C/A, 
new roof, 2-patlos, beautiful 
take view with water rights to 
Chain, low taxes, definitely not 
a drive-by. $159,000. Call for 
appointment (647) 356-3910. 

ROUND LAKE 3-BED- 
ROOM, 1 full bath, newly re- 
modeled and new carpeting, 
$98,000. (647) 546-9960. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 3-4 

bedroom home, updated kitch : 
en and bath, new decks, hew 
garage, basement ready to fin-" 
ish. $95,900. (847) 812^31 IB. 

ROUND LAKE 

BEACH/LAKE VILLA 

HOME FOR SALE 2-story, 
adorable 3-bedroom. Must 
see. 2-car garage, finished 
basement, big deck, screened 
back porch, fenced yard, lots 
of storage. Famllyroom with 
fireplace, large kitchen, living- 
room, dlnlngroom. Asking 
$152,900. Call (847) 
740-4560 for appointment. 
Available end of May. 

ROUND LAKE PARK, BEST 
VALUE IN LAKE COUNTY1 
sontemporary, 2-story, 4-bed- 
room, 2.5 baths. 2400sq,ft. 
Must see. Full finished base- 
ment, billiardroom, glass 
block wet bar. Basement 
adds another l,000sq.ft. 
7yrs, young. $175,000, For 
Sale . By Owner. (847) 
740-4067. 

SOUTHSIDE 3-BEDROOM 
RANCH, with recroom In 
basement, newer carpeting In 
livingToorn,' hard wood floors In 
bedrooms, oversized garage. 
Many extras. (414) 694-5896 
for appointment, 

SPRING GROVE FARM- 
HOUSE Charming 2-story on 
2.4 acres, 3-4 bedrooms, 2- 
baths, newly remodeled kitch- 
en and bath, flagstone fire- 
place. Must see. $215,000. 
(815)675-9016, 

SPRING GROVE HAVE 
kids or like to entertain? No 
problem In this 4-bedroom, 3- 
bull bath home on 1 acre, 3- 
car garage, roomy eat-In kitch- 
en, diningroom, large . living- 
room^ famllyroom with brick 
fireplace. Backyard Includes 
cedar shed, 3-seasons gaze- 
bo with electric, large deck, 
large patio and wood swing 
set. Asking $228,000. (815) 
675-1604. 



SPRING GROVE METICU- 
LOUS stone cedar custom 
built home. 4-bedrooms, 4- 
baths, on 1,5 wooded acres, 
3,300sq.ft.. walk-out base- 
ment, open loft overlooking 
greatroom with stone fire- 
place, 2-whlrlpool baths, wrap 
around deck, 3.5 car garage, 
upgrades galore. By owner 
$339,000. (815) 675-3800. 

SPRING GROVE WATER- 
FRONT, nice 1 -bedroom cot- 
tago with fireplace, also large 
fenced-in backyard, plus boat 
dock, owner financing, 
$89,900. 10% down, 
$750/month. (847) 497-3256, 
(847) 988-2078. 



SPRING GROVE, Oak Valley 
Estates. FOR SALE BY 
OWNER. Beautiful custom 
built 7yr. old home, 4-bed- 
rooms, 2-1/2 baths, full base- 
ment, A house you must sea 
-to appreciate, all the quality 
features, Asking $249,000. 
For more details call 

(815) 938-9008. 

STOP RENTING! I OWN for 

less. SO Down, No credit need- 
ed. Guaranteed approval, 1- 
800-360-4620 ext. 8203 (SCA 
Network). 



THREE-FOUR BEDROOM 
HOUSE, large fenced yard, 
Grayslake area Schools. 
(847) 231-5166, 



504 



Homes For Rent 



BUY A HOME NOWI 

Make Your Dream 

Come True I 

We will get you the 

down payment. 

Call for more Information, 

Mortgage Makers, Inc. 

An Illinois residential 

mortgage licensee 

615-344-8005 

Equal Housing Lender 




Homes Tor Rent 



TWIN LAKES, WISCON- 
SIN cedar and brick 3-bed- 
room ranch home, llvlngroom, 
diningroom, kitchen, family- 
room, den, 1.75 baths,' full 
English basement, huge 2- 
tiered deck, 3-car garage, 1.3 
wooded acres with thousands 
In professional landscaping, 
immaculate Inside and out. 
Highly rated Randall Grade 
School. For appointment call 
(262)877-9620.. 

VA/HUD REPOSI 

New lists weekly. 

Call Ryan & Co., Realtors 

"Your Repo Specialists.* 

(847) 526-0300, 

VINTAGE BEAUTY, 
GREAT Waukegan neighbor- 
hood, 3-bedrooms, hardwood 
floors and trim, fireplace, con- 
tra) air, $134,900. (647) 
662-5942. 

WAUCONDA FOR SALE by 
"owner, 4-bedroom, 2-1/2 bath. 
Call for Info. Days (847) 296- 
0302, evenings (847) 
526-4522, ask for Mike, 
— " ~ r 1 ~ 

WAUKEGAN 4-BED- 
ROOM, 3.5 bath, 2.5 car at- 
tached garage, 3,000sq.ft., on 
dead end street, fireplace, 
cathedral ceilings, must see, 
$245,000. Call Larry (847) 
249-5245. 

WE HAVE THE DREAM 
HOUSE FOR YOU. Whether 
first time buyer or empty 
nester. Like new Inside and 
out. Approximately I.OOOsq.ft., 
home has 2-bedrooms, new 
kitchen and bath, living room 
with a breath taking view of 
Lake Tahoe, Burlington, Wis- 
consin School District. (262) 
878-0765 for appointment. 

WITH YOUR GOOD CRED- 
IT owner may assist with down 
payment. 2-bedroom, 1-bath 
comes with appliances, Includ- 
ing dishwasher. Ready to 
move in. Can be seen on 
www.seelheinslde.com House 
#925. $829,000. (847) 
546-6726. 

WONDER LAKE RAISED 
ranch, 3-bedrooms, 2-baths. 
C/A, fenced yard, 2.5 car ga- 
rage, quiet street. $119,000. 
(800) 244-7920 ext. 213.- - 

WOODSTOCK JUST 
MOVE In, just off historic 
square, 2-bedroom, new roof, 
windows, carpel, paint, deck, 
hot water heater. Close to eve- 
rything. $89,900. Call Kevin 
(815) 337-9044. ' 

WWW.SEETHEIN- 
SIDE.COM IS WHERE you 
gel to see the picture of my 
house. Use II. 925. 2-bedroom, 
1-bath, ready to move Into. 
With your good credit, f may 
assist with down payment. 
$829,000. (8471 546-6726. 



First .& Second 

k Mortgages , 



CASH FAST - Low Rates 

Purchases, Refinances and 

Specialty Products 

• No Application Feetl 
•125% LTV Loans 

• No Income/No Asset 
Verification Programs 

• Slow Credit-High Debt 
Ratios OK 

• 85% Cash on Investment 

GRANT 

Financial Services, Inc. 
Ph: 630-351-3065 
28D3 Huttcr field Rd. S-170 
Oak Drook, IL 60523 
IL Mortgage Licensee 



LAKEFRONT CROSS 
. LAKE 1/2 mile from Dt.Antl- 
och. Immaculate 2-bedroom, 
fb., gar.,, fish, swim, ski, 
$1,350/monlh. No pets. (847) 
, 726-0448. 

WILLIAMS BAY, WISCON- 
SIN, SMALL 2-BEDROOM 
WITH DEN. LARGE 2-BED- 
ROOM WITH ENCLOSED 
PORCH 5 minutes to lake, 
private country setting, 5525- 
5625/month. (847) 498-1 418. 

ZION 3-BEDROOM, 2-1/2 
bath, on cul-de-sac, 12 miles 
to Naval base. $1,3D0/mohth 
plus utilities and security de- 
posit. Available Immediately. 
(757) 467-1034. 



FOX LAKE 3-BEDROOM 

lake home, by Port Of Blarney, 

on Channel with fishing pier 

.and beach, $995/monlh. (630) 

372-1936, 

Grayslake 

Brand new 3 bedroom; 

2.5 bath home, Basement, 

2 car garage, large yard, 

no pets. 

Deposit required $1695. 

Kurt Nouta 

847-265-1300 

Coldwotl Bankor 



514 



Condo 
Town Homes 



JON DO FOR SALE Vaca- 
tion Village, Fox Lake, 1 -bed- 
room Clipper, pool, marina, 
security gate, $39,000/best, 
(847) 5B7-1109. 



UBERTYVILLE 

FOR RENT 

2 bedroom condo close to 

downtown shopping & Metra. 

SB25/mo, No pets. 

847-360-8842 



TOWNHOME 3 BEDROOM, 
2.5 bath finished lower level, 
2 car garage, oak trim 
throughout, central air, cathe- 
dral celling on upper level. 
Asking $165,000. Golf 
course communlty/Wads- 
worth. For more Informa- 
tion/appointment for viewing. 
847-782-1105 



TOWNHOUSE ON PISTA- 
KEE LAKE. Lakeview, pier 
with slip. 2-bedrooms, 2-1/2 
baths, oak trim, deck, fire- 
place, all appliances Including 
washer/dryer, 1 -mile to Metra. 
$118,000.(847)587-5922. 



WAUKEGAN 2-BED- 

ROOM, 3-LEVEL condo, 
fully finished basement, Cen- 
tral alr/heatlng, $82,500, (847) 
625-5280. 




14X72 MOBILE HOME with 
14x20 addition on large lot, 3- 
bedrooms, kitchen with break- 
fast bar, large llvlngroom, 
washer/dryer, mega storage, 
large attached deck and two 
storage sheds. Wheatland 
Schools, 320,000. (262) 
537-2357, (262) 862-9245. 

MOBILE 1990 CARROLL- 
TON, double wide, Kenosha, 
newly carpeted, air, 3-bed- 
rooms, 2-baths, natural fire- 
place, deck, shed, $35,900. 
(262) 552^7666. 

MOBILE HOME 12X48, 
newly decorated, stored In Elk- 
horn, Wise. Must sell. 
$3,75Q/best. (70B) 453-5946. 

MOBILE HOME 3-BED- 
ROOM, new furnace, central 
air, large kitchen, large living- 
room, large shed. A Must see. 
$14,500.(262)942-4111. 

MODULARS- DOU- 

BLEWIDES-SINGLEW1DES 
ILLINOIS LARGEST DIS- 
PLAY OF MODEL HOMESI 
BASEMENTS GARAGES 
SEPTICS. »WE DO IT ALLII 
FREE STATEWIDE DELIV- 
ERY AND INSTALLITION. 
RILEY MANUFACTURED 
HOMES 800-790-1541 



NEW 2-BEDROOM, 1- 
BATH MOBILE HOME AVAIL- 
ABLE. Price includes: refrig- 
erator, stove, set-up and 
more. $33,900 (plus tax). Im- 
mediate occupancy. Shown by 
appointment. (847) 566-6690. 
Financing available, Diamond 
Lake Mobile Home Park, 



SHORECREST 


POINT 2- 


BEDROOM, 


14x70, 


$10,000/best. 


(414) 


654-8818, 






520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



. WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
WALK TO EVERYTHING 

Located in an over 
55 community, ■ 
NEWLY DECORATED 

1990 1 -bedroom, 
1-1/2 bath, with carport 

and shed. $39,900. 

1990 1 -bedroom, 
1-1/2 bath, with carport, 

and shed, $29,900. 

1989 2-bedroom. 1-bath, with 
room addition and shed, 

$52,900. 

1990 1 -bedroom, 1-bath, with 
carport and shed, $26,900. 

1989 2-bedroom, 2-balh, 

with carport, screenroom 

and shed, $49,900. 

(847) 526^5000 

leave message. 



THREE BEDROOM TRAIL- 
ER, newly remodeled, nice 
lot, big shed, pool. Close to 
town and train. In Timber 
Creek Mobile Park between 
Rts. 134 and 120. $7,500 or 
best offer. Rich or Cathy 
(262) 877-8621. 

UNION GROVE 1972 Rollo- 
home 14x70 with a 12x16 ad- 
dition, 3-bedrooms, covered 
deck, 2 sheds, Includes ap- 
pliances. Asking $27,000/besl. 
(414)878-2726. 



520 



Apartments 
For Rent 




GRAYSLAKE APART- 

MENT, 1 -bedroom, In nice 
neighborhood, laundry faclll- [ 
ties, on site manager/ No pets. 
Security deposit plus referenc- 
es, 5610/month. . Available 
March 1st. (847)223-0022. 

GURNEE/WAUKEGAN 
NORTH SHORE . 
APARTMENTS . 
At Affordable Prices. , 
Spacious. 
Luxury Living. 

Elevators. 

On Site Staff. 

Good Location. 

Easy to Toll Roads. 

IMPERIAL TOWER/MANOR. 

(847)244-9222. 

LAKEVIEW TERRACE 

APARTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA, Large 1 & 2 bedrooms; 
$645-$760/month. Heat, wa- 
ter, air Included, (847) 
356-5474, 



Lilac Apartments 

3 Lilac 

Fox Lake, IL 

1 and 2 bedroom 

available March 1st. 

Senior housing 

847-587-8830 



FOX LAKE STUDIO 

$430/month, marina, swim- 
ming, golf, tennis. Private 
beach, 24hr. security, 1yr., 
lease and good credit re- 
quired. No pets. Call Jim for 
appointment (847) 973-1454. 



FOX LAKE VACATION 
VILLAGE LARGE STU- 
DIO, $470/month, plus 
utilities, . security en- 
trance, beautiful sur- 
roundings, laundry, and 
many extras, no pets. 
(847) 223-1131. 



FOX LAKE WATERFRONT 
and Rt. 12. Deluxe 1 -bedroom 
apartment unit, $625/month. 
(708) 788-5564. 



LONG LAKE APT 

1 bedroom close to metra. 

Lake, Park, all utilities 

included $600. 

Available Immediately. 

847-546-4407 

MODERN 1-BEDROOM 

LAKEFRONT apartment, 
free heat, no pets, 
$575/month plus security. 
(847) 395-5404. 



Grayslake 



Center 
St. Apts. 

• 2 bedroom 
apartments 

Spacious Floor 
Plan 

Close to Metra 



Utilities 
included. 

Call today! 

(847) 395-0949 



Lake wood Village Apartments 



In Island Lake and Grayslake 

Offering affordable housing for qualified applicants 
Now accepting applications for our: 



. • /,2 and 3 bedroom apartments 
•Wheel-chair accessible, I bedroom 



Please call for more information or appointment ac 

(847)223-6644 
TDD# (800) 526-0844 £=J 



1 



S* 



Meridian Group, tnc. 







A Place To 



Home 




• i & 2 ddrm spacious tudor puj^s 

• On-site 24-hour emergency maint. 

• Satellite TV now available 

• Laundry facilities 

• Convenient to Mltra 

• Beautifully manicured grounds 

• Flexible leasinc 



ANnoai 

|mano»1 



445 Donin Dr. 

Antioch, IL 

(B47) 395-0949 



Deep Lake Hermitage 

149 N. Milwaukee Ave, 

Lake Villa. IL 

(847) 356-2002 






OAKRIDGE VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 



Offering Affordable Housing for Qualified Applicants. 

Currently Accepting Applications on our 

1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments 

Wheelchair accessible, 1 bedroom. 

Stop in at: 

299 Oakrldge Court in Antioch 

Or call- 

!V f=Y 847-395-4840 

K ra£ 1-800-526-0844TDD 

Hinwii by MrrUiui Group, Inc. 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



H2 



i^ Business Property 
For Rent 



WAUCONDA '1-BEDROOM 
APARTMENT, heat and 'hot 
water Included, $565/morith' : 
plus "security deposit and 
lease. No pels. References. 
Available Immediately. (847) 
433-0891. ,: 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING 

Cozy Studio apartment 

Includes all utilities. 

Available Immediately. 

No pets, 

S570/month plus security. 

(847)526-5000 

leave message. 

WAUKEGAN NORTH 2- 
FLAT, \arr-3 2-bedroom up- 
per, sunny and bright, 

$590/month. (847) 336-4952 

ZION EAST SIDE VALUE 
Nice 1 -bedroom, first floor. No 
pets. $445/month plus electric 
and gas. (847) 831-5388. 



FOX LAKE- 

NEW 

LAKEVIEW 

OFFICES 

ON GRAND AVENUE. 
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE. 
• 5300/MONTH. 
(847)587-1815. 

FOX LAKE RT.. 12 Excellent 
visibility, new, 1200sq.ft., of- 
fice/retail. (708) 786-5564 
l eave message. 

GRAYSLAKE DOWN- 

TOWN lSQ0sq.1t. Center 
Street Storefront. Also 
765sq.tt., downtown store/of- 
fice for rent. 1200sq.ft. shop 
space for rent. Call for details, 
(847) 604-3295. 



528 



Apt/Homes 
To Share 



UTILITIES PAID1I 

Roommates Wanted. 

Newer home, 

clean, nice rooms. 

Good location. 

Call Mason (847) 746-2577. 

H. Mason Enterprises, Inc. . 



SEEKING RESPONSIBLE 
INDIVIDUAL to snare 2-bed- 
room home In Winthrop Har- 
bor. S500/month plus security. 
Includes all utilities except 
phone. References required. If 
Interested call (847) 731-3B60. 

WONDER LAKE, Male/Fe- 
male to share 2 BR house on 
lake with laundry. You will 
have house to yourself 50% 
of the time. Pay 1/2 of rent & 
utilities. Call and ask tor Ed. 
(815) 385-6757 Leave Msg. 



LANDSCAPE 
CONTRACTOR 

2000 Sq. Ft. Pole Barn 

plus acreage 

for growing product 

in 

Richmond. 

Negotiable, 

Land 
Management 

815-678-4334 



WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
LOCATED ON MAIN 
STREET 1200SQ.FT. 

BUSINESS WITH OFFICE, 

5795/month plus utilities. 
Available Immediately. (847) 
526-5000, leave mes- 
sage. 



540 



530 



Rooms For Rent 



Investmenl 
Property 



PISTAKEE HIGHLANDS 
One room 

$335/mon1h, house privileg- 
es, responsible, honest, non- 
smoker. Must love animals. 
Call 847-497-9016 

ROOMS FOR RENT 

$95 a week 

Full house privileges. 

Chain of Lakes area, 

647:322-0323 



SIX APARTMENT UNITS 
All brick with garages, North 
side Waukegan, good cash 
flow. No contracts. (847) 
662-3241. 



560 



Vacant Lot 
Acreage 



TWO ROOMS AVAILABLE 

FOR RENT 

In large Lake Villa home, 

off Rt. 59 & 132, 

fully furnished, 

$375-$400/month. 

1-800-255-4859 

ext. 4689, 
(847) 973-0128, 
(414) 089-2012. 




. Business Property 
For Sale 



APPROXIMATELY 
3000SQ.FT. BUILDING on 
major North/South road. 
$129,000. Remax Grand, ask 
for sue (847) 587-8200. 



ARIZONA- 
4 Industrial Properties For 
Sale. *35,707sf dlst, 100% 
occ. Tucson 9.5% CAP $2 
Mil *68,077sf office/Fi & D, 
100% occ, N. Tucson 9.75 
CAP, S4.3 Mil M32,281sf 
multitenant Ind/Dist, 96% 
leased, Phoenix 9,75 
CAP, $7.9 Mil *59,504sf 
100% occ, W. Phoenix 
10% CAP $2.7Mil. Princi- 
pals only. Brent Rlchter, 
Wilson Property Services, 
Inc. (Owner Agent) 602- 
241-1515 



BUSINESS FOR SALE 
Established Air Feed and 
Pick & Place. Includes 
prints, catalog, customer list- 
distributor list, web page do- 
main. 

(262)534-7748 

IDEAL BUSINESS LOCA- 
TION Heart of downtown Mu- 
ndeleln. Formerly an op- 
tometrists office for 20yrs., 
currently used as Real Es- 
tate Appraisal office. Approx- 
imately 900sq.fi. house with 
full unfinished basement, 
very high visibility location, 
50x1 50ft, site, plentiful con- 
venient on site parking. 
House has new roof, new In- 
sulated windows, new fur- 
nace, new C/A/C, newly 
fenced backyard, 1-car de- 
tached garage, .6 miles to 
Metra. $1 25,000. 21 W. Haw- 
ley St. (847)949-5327. 

TWO ACRES WITH BUILD- 
ING, light Industrial or possible 
commercial on high traffic 
Avenue. 190ft. frontage, possi- 
ble fast food location in Ke- 
nosha. Call Gene (262) 
818-9BB8. 



BUJLD TO SUITI TREVOR. 
WISCONSIN 1/2 acre parcel, 
private well on sewer. (414) 
862-2197. 

BURLINGTON, WISCON- 
SIN, 10-1/2 wooded acres In 

developed subdivision, 

$89,900. (847) 746-8996. 
Custom house blue prints 

available. 

DAVIS, ILLINOIS CORN- 
ER oversized (113x197) lake- 
view lot in Lake Summerset. 
Boating, fishing, pool, parks. 
Low taxes. 532,000. (773) 
622-2276. . 

FIVE-NINE ACRE HOME- 
SITES, near Wilmot, Wiscon- 
sin from $89,000. Some wood- 
ed and walk-outs. Horses/pole 
buildings OK. Owner will 
finance, $2,000 down @ 6%. 
(815) 678-^228. 

HALF ACRE LOT FOR r 
SALE Private cul-de-sac, 
city sewer, well water, 2 
miles North of Antioch on 
Rt. S3. Call for Info. Must 
see. (815) 344-0883. 

LOOKING FOR A LOT? 1 
acre lot, Spring Grove, 52,000 
down, no interest or payments 
for 18 months or will discount 
for cash. Call owner (815) 
678-4228. 

POPLAR GROVE, ILLI- 
NOIS Double lot on North 
Main Street. Residential. 
S45,000/negotiable. (815) 
765-2133. 

UNIQUE FARMETTE 

HEARTLAND Township 

Countryside Two residences 
on 9.4+acres. horse barn with 
4 1st. class stalls and drive-In 
hay loft, fenced arena and 
turnout, new 3 stall garage + 2 
drive-in sheds. Farm house Y" 
modernized, 3-bedroom, 1- 
bath, basement, high eff. heat, 
farm size kitchen, laundry, _^ 
deck. Second house, 1-bed- -* 
room, LR dinette, oak kitchen, 
utilityroom, large deck, zoned r 
A2, immediate occupancy. 
More acreage available. Miles 
of vistas across open fields 
and Kishwaukee stream, 
$285,000. (815) 943-9892 or " *•' 
(608) 723-2795. 




NEW ORLEANS 

French Quarter. 1 & 2 BR 

fully turn condos, 

Starting at 51 69K. 

Great vacation homes, 

504-529-4663 



..^■W-*-*.^-..-^.- 



»».^4,~~..-.. ,.,, " ' 



— 



C22 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 








Out of Area 
Property 



FLORIDA-What are you 
wailing for? Sunshine & 
tropical breezes awail. Fan- 
tastic price for this hew 4 
BR/2.5BA home In Naples, 
FL. Over 2000-sf & 2.5c-gar 
& only 5mins to the Gulf of 
Mexl $219,9001 

Coldwelf Banker 

McFndden & Sprawls. 

independently owned & 

operated. Arlys Kravel 

800-767-1552x214. 



SOUTHERN COLORADO 
RANCH SALE 40AC/WELL - 
S36.900. Enjoy sensational 
sunsets over the Rockies and 
views of Pikes Peak on gently 
rolling terrain. Long road fron- 
tage, tete & elec. Ideal for 
horses. Exc. financing. Call 
now 719-676-6367 



WISCONSIN (Control)- 
For Sale by Owner. Log 
hm, 1.75 wooded ac pond. 
New kit, 2BR/1BA, vault 
cells, stained glass wind- 
ows, deck, pool, hottub. 
S1 16,500. Susan 262-547- 
8350/262-641-5700 



WISCONSIN-Resorl for 
Sate by Owner. Exc In- 
vestment oppty. Lakefronl 
bar & grill w/10 unit motel 
on 1.3 acs. Loc 12mi E. of 
Lk Geneva on beaut. Lily 
Lk. 227fl Ikfrnt beach. 
Handicap access. Incl 
sand, volleyball crt,' horse- 
shoe pits, satellite dish, 
pier, raft & lie. Main bar & 
restaurant cover 43l0sf. 2 
Ig income apts on 2nd llr. 
Price incl 1 & 2 car gar. 
S750K. Will consider sub- 
dividing bar & apts from 
motel. 

262-537-4242 



704 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



19B2 24FT, KAYOT PON- 
TOON BOAT, includes chairs 
and O/B motor, S4.500. (847) 
395-8637. 

LAYTON 1993 TRAVEL 

TRAILER 26ft. , front bedroom, 
rear bunk, sleeps 8, full bath, 
awning, A/C, hitch included, 
SB.900. (847) 249-0166. 

MOTORHOME 1995 

PACE Arrow, 33ft., Chev 454, 
under 20K miles, fully loaded, 
steeps 4, includes car caddy 
and hitch, $84,500. (847) 
623-4874. 



708 



Snowmobiles 
ATV's 



ARCTIC CAT PANTHER 
440, 1999, 2 up, low miles, 
has electric start, reverse, 
hand and thumb warmers, ad- 
justable seat, with cover, very 
comlortable ride, S3.700. 
*j (262) 889-4304 after 5pm. 

SNOWMOBILE 19B5 V- 
MAX 540, very .clean, runs 
great, low miles, 51,200. (815) 
r 385-7856, pager (815) 
385-505Q. 

SNOWMOBILE 1999 SKI 

DOO GRAND TOURING 700. 
only 400 miles, mint condition. 
56,500/best. (262) 279-9691 
after 5pm. 

YAMAHA ATV 1996, 350cc, 
6-speed, 1 -owner, make offer. 
(815)759-1710. 



710 


Itoat/Motors/Ktc. 



SELL OUT SALE Small Pro- 
pellers, ski vests, accessories. 
(815) 385-4729. 

SLIPS AVAILABLE ON 
FOX LAKE with electric lifls. 
(847) 356-8038. 

TRANSPORTATION 



724 


Airplanes 



1946 LUSCHOMBE BA, 
65hp, with fabric wings, wood 
prop and skis. Recent paint 
and glass. Looks and flies 
great, S16.500. (414) 
248-8702. 



804 



Cars for Sale 









(2) P275/40ZR17GY EAGLE 
GSC $300 or best 
offer, like new. 
5 piece bedroom sot, $200 
or best. 
1984 Cutlass Cfora, new 
trans, tires, brakes, needs 
head work, and back wind- 
ow, $600 or best offer, 
1996 Dodge Intrepid, 3.2 V- 
6, power everyihing, S8.000 

or best offer. 

Waterbed, needs matress, 

make offer. 

,. Kitchen table and choirs, 

make offer. 

262-862-1607 




Cars For Sale 



804 



Cars For Sale 



MERCURY 1993 SABLE 
LS. Mint condition. Loaded 
with every available option In-' 
eluding leather and moonroof, 
fully serviced and wlfiterlzed, 
runs like new, $4,995, (847) 
945-5217. 

MUSTANG GT. CONVERT-. 
IBLE 1999, 35th Anniver- 
sary, black, fully loaded, au- 
tomatic, 10.000 miles, 
525,000/best. (773) 

792-1879 days, (847) 855- 
2557 evenings, ask for Mark. 

BUICK 1987 GRAND 

NATIONAL, black w/ grey 

cloth, $6,995.00 

(847) 548-8500 

BUICK 1992 REGAL, 

55,995. (847) B56-3000. 

BUICK 1994 PARK AVE, 
57,995. (847) 856-3000. 

BUICK LESABRE 1996, Cus- 
tom, remote entry, 39,000 
miles, all power equipment. 
(262)889-8526 6-9pm 
Weekends 10am-7pm 

BUICK LESABRE 1996, Cus- 
tom,, remolo entry, 39,000 
miles, all power equipment. 
(262)889-8526 6-9pm 
Weekends 10am-7pm 

CADILLAC 1985 SEDAN De-' 

Ville Rebuilt trans., new: 
tires/brakes, many new 
parts, excellent condition, 
needs new engine, best offer. 
847-244-5443 

CHARITY CARS DONATE 

your vehicle , tax deductible 
free towing. We provide vehi- 
cles to needy families. As 
seen on Oprah and People 
magazine! 1-800-442-4451 
www.charitycars.org 

CHEVEROLET 1987 

MONTE Carlo SS, arrow 

coupe t-top. All power $2,500 

OBO 

Rich or Cathy 

262-877-8621 

CHEVROLET 1988 COR- 
VETTE, $14,990. (847) 223- 
8651, 

CHEVROLET 1994 COR- 
VETTE CPE., $23,990. (847) 
223-8651. 

CHEVROLET 1995 CAM- 
ARO CONVT, 512,990. (847) 
223-8651. 

CHEVROLET 1996 COR- 
SICA, $6,990. (847) 223- 
8651, 

CHEVY 1981 CAMARO, re- 
built motor, new battery, some 
rust. (262) 652-3473. 

CHEVY 1986 SUBURBAN, 
2 wheel drive, excellent con- 
dition, $2,500 or best offer. 
847-599-0384 

CHEVY 1991 BERETTA, 

66,000 miles, fair condition, 
but runs great, 52,900. 1989 
Yamaha Exciter snowmobile, 
good condition, $1,000. (847) 
740-2219. 

CHEVY 1991 CAVALIER, 

good shape, $2,000. (647) 
395-8258 after 5pm. 

CHEVY 1999 METRO, 
$6,995. CALL DON (847) 662- 
2400. 

CHEVY, FORD PICKUP 

BODIES Factory-new guar- 
enleed Irom S1 300.00 Doors 
from $89.00. Fenders from 
$50.00, Beds from $800.00 
Bedliners S1 45.00 BUMP- 
ERS.GRILLS, REPAIR PAN- 
ELS. PAINTS, ABRAISIVES, 
WINDSHIELDS, RADIA- 

TORS. Delivery (MARX) 217- 
824-6148 

CHYSLER LEBARON 
CONVT 1994 $6,995 
(847)548-5962 

DODGE 1990 SHADOW, 
S1.995. CALL DON (847) 662- 
2400. 

DODGE 1995 INTREPID, 4 

door, cruise, air, power wind- 
ows/locks, antilock brakes, 
new 16" tires, 62,000 miles, 
excellent condition, non- 
smoker. Must seel $8,200 or 
best offer. 262-694-2392, 

DODGE 1995 INTREPID, 4 

door, cruise, air, power wind- 
ows/locks, antilock brakes, 
new 16" tires, 62,000 miles, 
excellent condition, non- 
smoker. Must seel $8,200 or 
best offer, 
262-694-2392 

DODGE 1996 INTREPED 

ES, loaded V6, $8,395.00 

(847) 548-8500 



DODGE 1997 AVENGER ES, 

V6, $11,995. 

(847) 548-8500 



DODGE 1999 INTREPID, 

$13.995. (847)856-3000. 

DODGE NEON 1996 $6,900 
(847)623-1492 

EAGLE TALON 1992, 

$6,990. (847)223-8651. 

EAGLE TALON 1992, 

auto., sunroof, bra, very clean 
Inside and out, $4,500. Call 
eves. (847)587-1737. 

FORD 1989 ESCORT 
Station Wagon 
Automatic, runs great, 
low mileage $600. 
262-862-2321 

FORD 1994 MUSTANG GT, 

low miles V-8, $9,995.00 

(847) 548-8500 

FORD 1994 THUNDER- 
BIRD LX. $5,995, (847) 856- 
3000. 

FORD 1997 PROBE GT, 

cherry red, $6,995.00 

(847) 548-8500 

FORD 1998 CROWN VIC- 
TORIA. LOW PRICE. MUST 
SELL. ASK FOR DENNIS 

(8*7) 336-2340. 

FORD 1999 TAURUS SE. 
MUST SELL. ASK FOR DEN- 
NIS (B47)N336-2340. 

FORD EXPLORER 1991,1 
owner, 95K, (847) 740-9545 

■ 

FORD MUSTANG 1997 

$9,995 (847)548-5962 

FORD TAURUS 1996 $7,995 
(847)548-5962 

GEO PRISM 1995, excel- 
lent condition, red sedan, LSI, 
5-speed, great starter/family 
car, $6,200/best. 1996 
HONDA MAGNA 750, valve, 
excellent condition, very low 
miles, yellow/black, 

$S,500/best. (847) 336-2312. 

HONDA 1995 CIVIC DX, 5- 
speed, 79K highway miles, ex- 
cellent condition, $8,500/best. 
(847)356-1218. 

HONDA 1997 ACCORD 

LX, 4-door, automatic, black 
with gray interior. Asking 
$14,500. (262) 605-9256. 



HONDA 1999 
314.995. CALL 
662-2400.-- 



ACCORD, 

DON (847) 



804 



Cars For Sale 



HYUNDAI 1998 ELAN- 
TRA, 4-door, maroon, 130hp, 
4-cylinder, average miles, new 
tires. (262) 657-7475. 

JEEP 1991 RANGLER 
6 disc changer, soundbar. 
31" sidewinder tires. < 

$6,000 or best offer 
847-266-0906 

MERCEDES SEL 1982, 4- 
door Sedan, $4.100/best. 
(B15)356-053B. 

MERCURY 1995 COU- 
GAR, $8,995. CALL DON 
(B47) 662-2400, 

MERCURY 1995 GRAND 
MARQUIS, $6,995. CALL 
DON (847) 662-2400. 

MERCURY 1996 SABLE, 

$8,995. (847) 662-2400. 

MERCURY MYSTIQUE 1995 
$4,995 (847)548-5962 

MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE 1993 

$2,995 (847)623-1492 

NEED A CAR? 

NEED CREDIT? 

Call 888-24APPROVE 

Mr. Kayo has placed more 

people In need of credit In 

vehicles than anyone 

In the oreol 

NISSAN 1993 ALTIMA 
GXE, automatic, A/C, cruise, 
am/fm cassette, ABS, 
$6,500/best. (847) 54B-4812. 

OLDS 1992 CUTLASS SU- 
PREME, 4-door, automatic, 
V6, clean in and out, runs ex- 
cellent, $3,500. (B47) 
596-2620. 

OLDS 1993 CUTLASS SU- 
PREME, $6,995, (847) 856- 
3000. 

OLDS 1998 CUTLASS, 

$11,995. (847)8 56-3000. 

OLDSMOBILE 98, 1984. A 
real lookerl Champagne color, 
automatic everything, looks 
great Inside and out. Excellent 
runner, mechanically sound, A 
real steal at $2,100, Call (262) 
654-6543 ask lor Susan, 

PLYMOUTH 1989 SUN- 
DANCE, blue, only used lo- 
cally, 30,000 m!le3, perfect 
condition, $3,000/best, (847} 
566-0990. 

PLYMOUTH 1991 AC- 
CLAIM, excellent runner, one 
owner. Blue Book value whole- 
sale $2,500, retail $3,600. Sell 
for $2,599. (262)539-3614. 



PONTIAC 199 BONNE- 
VILLE SE, $16,995. (B47) 

856-3000. 

PONTIAC 1993 BONNE- 
VILLE, $6,995. (847) 856- 

3000. . 

PONTIAC 1993 GRAND 

PRIX, full power, all options, 
100,000 miles, blue, offers, 
(847) 204^456B. _^ 

PONTIAC 1994 GRAND AM 

GT, 4 door, $5,995.00 

(847) 548-8500 

PONTIAC 1997 FIRE- 
BIRD, $12,995. (B47) 956- 
3000. 

PONTIAC 1997 GRAND 

AM. $9,995. (847) 856-3000, 

PONTIAC GRAND AM 1993 
$3,995 (847)548-5962 

AUTO AUCTION 

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 

SALVATION ARMY 

Now Every Saturday 

9am. 

Over 100 to be sold 

woekly to tho highest 

bidder. 

Opening bid $100. 

No reserve. 

Grand opening at our new 

location In Waukegan on 

Rto120, one block east of 

Greenbay Road. 

(847)662-0100 

SATURN COUPE 1996, 
$7,995. CALL DON (847) 662- 
2400. 

SATURN SL1 1997, 

$7,995. (847) 856-3000. 

SEIZED CARS 

From $500 

Sport, luxury & economy cars, 

trucks. 4x4's utility and more. 

For current listings call 

1-800-311-5048 

X9832. 

SUBMIT YOUR LAKELAND 
CLASSIFIED ADS ON THE 
INTERNET! 
Visit http://www.lpnews.com/ 
to place your ads conven- 
iently. Ads appear on the In- 
ternet, in all Lakeland Pa- 
pers... The Great Lakes Bul- 
letin and The Market Journal 
lor only $20.50 for 4 lines 
(approximately 16 words), 
then .60c each additional 
line. 

TOYOTA 1991 CAMRY, 4- 

door power package, CD play- 
er, 1 -owner, well maintained, 
S3.500. (847) 395-3310 after 
6pm. 

TOYOTA 1993 CAMRY, 
' $6.990. (847)223-3651. 

TOYOTA 1993 CELtCA GT 
$5,995. CALL DON (847) 662- 
2400. 

VOLVO C70 COUPE 1998, 
530,985. (847) 362-9200. 

VOLVO S80 2.9, 1999, 
529,995. (647) 362-9200. 

VOLVO S90, 1997, 

$20,985. (B47) 362-9200. 

VW BEETLE 1998, red, au- 
tomatic, low mllege, $14,500. 
(847) 249-2454. 



814 



Service & I'ans 



CHEVY 1991 3.1 L V6 EN- 
GINE AND TRANS., new altr- 
nalor and injectors, weil main- 
tained, complete with accesso- 
ries. (847) 404-9674. 




CHEVY 1992 CONVER- 
SION VAN," V6, 90,000 miles, 
$3,800. Dodge 1971 Charger 
440 Magnum, 54,500, 19ft, 
SwilzerCraft 100hp Johnson 
outboard, 51,800 with trailer. 
(847)546-6015. 

CHEVY 1992 CONVER- 
SION VAN, good condition, 
83,000 miles, $8,500/best. 
(815) 678-4489. 



CHEVY 1993 ALL WHEEL 

DRIVE ASTRO VAN. 

Extended CL. 

Power everything, newer 

tires, dutch doors, two-tone 

new alternator. First $7,000 

takes It. 

847-2659931 

CHEVY 1998 CONVER- 
SION VAN, $16,995, CALL 
DON (847) 662-2400, 

DODGE 1996 GRAND 
CARAVAN, $10,995. CALL 
DON (847) 662-2400. 

FORD 1987 CARGO VAN, 
$2,995. CALL DON (847) 662- 

2400. 



824 



Vans 



FORD 1996 WINDSTAR, 
NICE VAN, MUST GO. (847) 
336-2340. 

FORD 1998 WINDSTAR, 
$13,995. CALL DON (847) 
662-2400, 

FORD WINDSTAR 1998 
$9,995 (847)548-5962 

GMC 1997 
2500 cargo van 
With windows & paneling, V- 
6 4.3, automatic, air, stereo, 
cruise, ABS, new brakes, 
tires, & tuno-up, EXCEL- 
LENT! II 

51 2,900 OR BEST. 
847-548-2054 

MERCURY 1993 VILLAGER, 

V-6, FULLY LOADED, 

$6,795.00. 

(847) 548-8500 

MINI VAN 1993 CARAVAN, 
loaded, 3.3 V6, runs great, 
$4,800/best. (847) 546-6198. 

PLYMOUTH 1993 GRAND 

VOYAGER LE, full power,. till, 
cruise, Infiniti AM/FM cas- 
sette, 3.3 V6, roof rack, 7-pas- 
senger, garage kept, well 
maintained with records, 
161 K, always starts. Asking 
54,800/oro. Call Pole (847) 
265-9003-work, (847) 721- 
0100 V.M, 

PLYMOUTH VOYAGER 

1988 V6, A/C, cruise, tilt, PAV. 
P/L, new engine and trans. 
S1.600. (847) 367-1586. 

PONTIAC 1992 TRANS 
SPORT, $6,995. (847) B56- 
3000, 



828 



Four Wheel Drive 



CHEVY 1993 K1500 4X4, 

extended cab, 5.7L, loaded. 
10 disc CD changer, auto 
start, bedllncr, cap, tow pack- 
age, blue/silver, 130,000 
miles, $10,000/best. (773) 
792-1879 days, (847) 855- 
2557 evenings, ask for Mark. 

CHEVY 1992 S-10 BLAZER 
4x4 2-door sport, new: front 
suspension, exhaust, starter. 
Runs great. High miles. 
$3,200. (847) 662'-6226. 

CHEVY 1995 BLAZER 
4WD, 59,495.00 
(847) 548-8500 

CHEVY 1995-TAHOE 4X4, 

$22,995. (847) 856-3000. 

CHEVY 1996 SUBURBAN 
LT 4X4. 523,495. (847) 856- 
3000. 

CHEVY 1998 TRACKER 

CONVERTIBLE. 59,595. (847) 
856-3000. 

CHEVY BLAZER 1993 

S9.995 (847)548-5962 

CHEVY S-10 EXTENDED 

CAB 1995 $11,900 (847)623- 
1492 

CHEVY SUBURBAN 1996 

S23.995 (847)548-5962 

DODGE 1998 DAKOTA 

SPORT, $12,995. (847) 856- 
3000. 

DODGE 1998 DURANGO 
SLT, 5.9L. black, aulo start, 
fully loaded, perfect condition, 
$22.000. (815) 363-9255. 

FORD 1987 EDDIE 

BAUER BRONCO II, 

14B,000 miles. Asking 
S2,500/firm. Call (847) 740- 
0769. 

FORD 1997 EXPLORER V8, 

$16,995. 

(847) 548-8500 

FORD 1998 EXPEDITION. 
MUST SELL. ASK FOR DEN- 
NIS (847) 336-2340. 

FORD BRONCO 1991 $7,200 
(847)623-1492 

FORD EXPLORER 1998 75K 
factory warrenly MANY OP- 
TIONS! $18,900. or B/O 847- 
223-7739 

GEO TRACKER 4DR. 1996 

$8,995 (647)548-5962 

GMC JtMMY 4X4, 1995. 
$13.995. (B47) 548-5962. 

GMC JIMMY SLE 4X4 1997, 
$15,995. (847)856-3000. 

GRAND CHEROKEE LARE- 
DO 1994 $9,900 (847)623- 
1492 . 

GRAND CHEROKEE LARE- 
DO 1995 SI 3,900 (B47)623- 
1492 

ISUZU RODEO 1995, 
$12,995. (847) S4B-5962. 

JEEP 1986 CHEROKEE 5- 

speed, 15,000 miles on new 
2,8 motor, new brakes, discs, 
bearings, muffler, works good, 
$3,800/best. Ramon Acuna 
8am-7pm. (847)249-0136. 



828 



Four Wheels 
Drhc/Jeeps 



JEEP 1997 GRAND 

CHEROKEE 4X4, $17,995. 

(847) 548-8500 

-JEEP 1997 WRANGLER 
4x4, $14,995. 
(847) 548-8500 

MAZDA MPV 4-WHEEL DR. 
1992 53,995 (847)623-1492 

MERCURY 1997 MOUN- 
TAINEER. GREAT LOOK- 
ING, MUST GO, ASK FOR 
DENNIS (847) 336-2340. 

NISSAN 1997 PATHFINDER 

SE, 4x4, $$14,995. 

(847) 548-8500 

NISSAN PATHFINDER 1995 

XE 4 dr. 4x4, red, all' options, 

security system. New Good-- 

year Wrangler tires, 1000ML 

tell on full warranty. 

$12,500. 

847-231-5506 

OLDS 1997 BRAVADA, 

$17,995. (847) 856-3000. 

SUZUKI SIDEKICK 4X4 

CONVERTIBLE 1992 $3,995 
(847)548-59,62 

SUZUKI SIDEKICK 
SPORT 1998, $12,995. (847) 
856-3000. 

WRANGLER SAHARA 1998 
$19,900. (847)623-1492 




CHEVROLET 1994 K1500 

4x4 extended cab, short bed, 
5.7L V6, excellent condition, 
loaded, hitch, black, 78K 
miles, $14,000. (262) 

942-8444. 

CHEVY 1987 3/4 TON 2WD 
350, unbelievable buy, au- 
tomatic, excellent condition, 
$4,500 with cap and rack. 
(847) 662-5202. 

CHEVY 1991 S-10 BLAZER 

4.3L., 4-door, 4X4, power 
windows/locks, A/C, Alumi- 
num wheels, 113,000 miles, 
good shape, $3,500 or best 
offer. 81 5-3B5-0414 
(weekdays 7am-4pm) 

CHEVY 1992 CONVER- 
SION VAN, TV. VCR, rear 
AC/heat. Runs great. 102K. 
350 motor, $6,500. (847) 
680-6764. 

CHEVY 1993 BLAZER LT 

TAHOE 4X4 

Loaded, leather interior, CD. 

$8,795 

847-395-7994 

Pager 847-237-1961 

CHEVY 1995 4WD, extend- 
ed cab, P/L, P/M, PAV, air, 
cruise, 'lilt, am/fm cassette, 
remote keyless entry, bug 
shield and bedllner, much 
more. Only 49,000 miles, war- 
ranty, very clean, 
$17,000/besl. (815) 
356-9807. 

CHEVY 1997 1500 SILVER- 
ADO 4X4. GREAT LOOKING. 
ASK FOR DENNIS (847) 336- 

2340. . 

CHEVY 1998 S-10 3 door, 
extended cab, 4X4 pickup, 
loaded, sprayed In bedliner, 
red, $14,000. 
312-656-6329 

CHEVY SILVERADO 1998 

$19.995 (847)548-5962 

DODGE 1993 DAKOTA LE; 
extended cab, 318 engine, 
cap, 75K miles, $8200. ' 
262-654-0120 after 4pm. 

DODGE 1996 DAKOTA 

Sport, every available option 

plus tinted windows, V-6 

magnum engine, Immaculate 

condition, $10,000. 

847-548-1469 

Ask for Ed 

DODGE 1996 DAKOTA, 
57,995. CALL DON (847) 662- 
2400. 

DODGE 1997 RAM 1500, 
EXT. CAB PU. Custom by 
Carriage Werks, glass run- 
ning brds, lonneau cover, 
gold pkg, green w/gold shad- 
owing, pwr seats/windows/ 

locks/tilt loaded! Tow 

pkg. & exl.ended warranty. 
Excellent cond, $16,900. 
(847) 265-8902. 

SUBMIT YOUR LAKELAND 

CLASSIFIED ADS ON THE 

INTERNETI 

Visit. http;//www.lpnews.com/ 
to place your ads conven- 
iently. Ads appear on the In- 
ternet, In alt Lakeland Pa- 
pers... The Great Lakes Bul- 
letin and Tho Market Journal 
for only $20.50 for 4 lines 
(approximately 16 words) , 
then .60s each additional 
lino. 

DODGE 1999 RAM 1500 
EXT. CAB 4X4 P/U, $24,990. 
(847) 223-8651. 



February 25, 2000 



834 


Trucks/Trailers 



FORD 19B7 TRUCK F-350, 
cab and chassis, 6.9 diesel, 
new fenders and doors, 
$4,000/best. (414) 877-9644. 

FORD 1989 F-150 XLT LAR- 
IET, 302, exl. cab, 8 ft bed 
with cap, High mileage, good 
condition. (847) 223-4937 

FORD 1994 EXPLORER. 
XLT; 4x4, 4 door, loaded, Ne- 
vada vehicle equals no rust. 
67K, Asking $13,000 or best 
offer. 
262-656-1399 

FORD 1996 RANGER EX- 
TENDED CAB, $9,995. CALL 
PON (847) 662-2400, 

FORD 199B F-150 PICKUP 
4X4. GREAT CONDITION. 
ASK FOR DENNIS. (847) 336- 
2340. 

FORD EXPLORER 1994 
EDDIE BAUER, excellent con- 
dition, 4x4, 86,000, leather. 
Serious buyers only, $13,000. 
(B1 5) 363-0854 LM. 

GMC 1994 SONOMA 

XTRA CAB, $8,995.00 

(847) 548-8500 

GMC SONOMA SLS EXT. 
CAB 1996. $7,995. (847) 856- 
3000. 

HEAVY DUTY 12FT. trailer, 
$350/best. Truck camper, 
5300/besl. Table saw, 
5175/best, (262) 889-3400. 

MAZDA 1987 B2000 PICK- 
UP. MAKE AN OFFR. (847) 
336-2340, 

MUST SEEII 
1993 Ford Ranger STX, 4.0 
V-6, 5 speed, 82K, excellent 
condition, 54,500/ best offer. 
262-279-5492 

MY TRUCK IS A 1987 
CHEVY S-10, 4-wheel drive, 
130.000, blue, $2,200. (847) 
B38-0759. 

OLDS 1992 "98" Touring SE 
Highway miles newer engine 
& transmission. 
$6,900 847-395-7994 
Pager 847-237-1961 




HA RLEY DAVIDSON 1970 
FLH ELECTRAGLIDE S&S 
Carb, shovel, extras, clean, 
57,500/OBO. Call evenings 
(414)694-7715. 

HONDA 1978 HAWK, 5,500 
miles, good condition, 5400. 
(262) 534-7748. 




BUICK 1987-91 LESABRE 
PARK AVENUE. Oldsmoblle 
Delta 68 Regency, Toronado, 
running or not. (262) 
889-8887. 




THE HANDYMAN NO job 

too small. Painting, carpentry 
and repair work. Reasonable 
rates and free estimates. 
(8471 223-7724. 




DEBBIE'S CLEANING 

SERVICE! 
19 Years Experience 

•Move outs, 

/'Senior Specials. 

Reasonable Rates. 

References available. 

(847) 973-9913. 



POLISH CLEANING LADY 
will clean your house, apart- 
ment. Quality work at reason- 
able prices. (847) 680-3129. 



S78 


Remodeling 



DC TILE WE We Inslsall ce- 
ramic, vinyl tile, Parquet, and 
Pergo floors. For free esti- 
mates call (847) 395-0777, 
pager (708) 988-8504, 

JACK'S 
REMODELING 

*Basemenl Finishing 

"Famllyrooms 4 Offlcerooms 

"Electrical & Plumbing 

"Kitchens & Baths 

•Vinyl Replacement Windows 

"Soffit Fascia, 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(847) 546-3759. 



1 



February 25, 2000 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers I C23 v 




winnERS 




All winners will receive complimentary movie tickets to 
Regal Cinemas (Round Lake) Congratulations! 












A6ES 4-6 
6A6ES LAKE 



Hi 35 — — ^Hi^fl ^E&H 

£® ©a 

IN6LESIDE 



A6E1 9-1Q 
FOX LAKE 



r/?an/< you to all our contestants. It was a very hard decision for our judges. J 




} 



£ 



r^xc^YfrT^r^x^v^x^^^ 



From our hands to your heart, 
deeply therapeutic bodywork! 

Consider Massage A Part 
Of Your Wellness. 

136 E. Hawley St., Grayslake 

(847) 223-2507 

Gift Certificates Available 



A&Ji&JU£>X&lSsy&j{Ss>x&j^^ 




1 



id 
li- 
7, 







1 S. Greenleaf Ave. 

Suite I 

Cumee, IL 60031 



World Wide Web Home Rage: 

http://wwvv.riear1andvasc.com 

{847)336-1600 



Heart and Vascular 
Center of Lake County 

Isaac Thomas M.D., FACC Medical Director 



Debbie 

Cardiovascular 

Nurses 



Jose Santos 
Technical 
Director 



Padma 

Echo 

Technologist 



MUNDELEIN 
COMMUNITY CENTER 

Springs Into wellness 
Saturday, March 11, from 10am-2pm 
-A 5§T/ Hosting a FREE HEALTH FAIR! 

j 1 . *J 'Lectures and discussions 

Health y& Fitnust •piiness center wortouU/CardloKIckBox& 

1401 N. Boot Camp Class 

Midi tlilaji Road 'Various healthcare vendor demonstrations 

(047) SGO-0050 'Giveaways and Refreshments 







The Nutritional Top Ten 

1 . Oats: The b-glucan in whole oats reduces the risk of coronary heart disease. The sol- 
uble fiber is instrumental in lowering cholesterol and stabilizing blood sugars. 

2. Soybeans: "Hie bioactive ingredients in soy protein products suppress the forma- 
tion of blood vessels that feed cancer cells. Soy helps stabilize hofmone levels in women, 
as well as decrease the risk of heart disease, osteoporosis and ovarian, breast, and prostate 
cancers. 

3. Tomatoes: Lycopene, a potent antioxidant, is a carotenoid that fights the uncon- 
trolled growth of cells into tumors. It fights cancer of the colon, bladder, pancreas and 
prostate. Men who eat ten servings of tomatoes per week have been shown to decrease 
their, prostate cancer risk by 66 percent. 

4. Coldwater Seafood: EPA/omega-3 oils are shown to decrease risk of coronary 
artery disease, stabilize blood sugars, increase brain power and reduce the inflammatory 
response. Seafood reduces LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, while raising levels of HDL 
cholesterol. 

5. Flaxseed: A unique source of lignans, powerful antioxidants that are believed to 
stop cells from turning cancerous. Flaxseed also contains alpha-lino!enic acid, the plant 
version of the omega-3s found in fish oils; it makes a great, healthy option for people who 
won't eat fish. 

6. Garlic: Rich in allicin, which boosts immune function and reduces cancer risk. 
Garlic also has strong anti-viral effects and has been shown to lower blood pressure and 
cholesterol levels. 

7. Hot Peppers: A source of capsaicin, a vital immune-booster with powerful anti- 
viral effects. Capsaicin is linked to decreased risk of stomach cancer due to its ability to 
neutralize nitrosamines, a cancer-causing compound formed in the body when cured or 
charred meats are consumed. Capsaicin also kills bacteria believed to cause stomach 
ulcers. 

8. Sweet Potatoes: A rival of carrots as a potent source of beta-carotene and other 
carotenoids, which help prevent cataracts and protect the body from free radicals and 
cancer-particularly cancer of the larynx, esophagus and lungs. 

9. Grapes: Grape skins contain a high concentration of resveratrol, which appears to 
block the formation of coronary artery plaque, as well as tumor formation and growth. 
Red grape juice or red wine is considered a better source of resveratrol than while, which 
is made without the grape skins. 

10. Cruciferous Vegetables: Broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower and Brussels 
sprouts contain indoles, sulforaphane, and isothiocyanates, which protect cells from dam- 
age by carcinogens, block tumor formation, and help the liver to inactivate hormone-like 
compounds that may promote cancer. 



C24 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



February 25, 2000 



Lakeland Newspapers is your 




To These Fine Lakeland Area Businesses & Services 



To Place 
Your Ad Here 
Call 

847-223-8161 





CONTRACTORS ELECTRIC SERVICE, INC) 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

"Call Us For fast Courteous Service* 

RESIDENTIAL-COMMERCIAL 

33265 N. Rte. 45 
Wildwood, IL 60030 

(847) 223-4682 



>4§3 




Horizon Remodeling Inc. 



Full-Service Remodeling 

Drywall 

Basement Finishing 

Garage Finishing 

■ Residential and Comme'rdal 



insured 



r 8 4 7 V 8 3 8-5949 



- 



J «,- : S*»t : t u J 'tB'^>,t>ir l "^e.htf> -f , AVt-- i "•■'---*%- .*■■■■-:■■ .^ -..v .•■■;.i". ':■■ 1 



i 



! 



847/395-3454 

Payroll, spread sheds, . 
general ledger, income 
£jj[- taxes & computer input, 
) ■ Call Karen Palka 
for an appointment today!- 



NWNHMMMHHHNMHHHMHMHHMMH 
HHI | Ml ■ 111 1 Ml ^ HM 

H HLiU3 ■ LiliiJ 3 u L*fi' i Fa n 

"Ifv^S Mil -Twh frninr Hfl H 

H7jmnKmMnBBBn\lK 



ALL AMERICAN 
^ CONST. * 

Kitchen-Bath-Basement^ 

Painting/Custom Remodeling 
Quality work at affordable prices 

($500 off with this ad) 

Free Estimates 

847-548-5110^ 



.Lie. Bonded hj&i**»_ 
& Insured 



IBBB 



MMMMMMMMMMHMMMMHMMHHMHH 




RECYCLE^ 

CASH For Alum. Cans 
Copper-Brass 
Insulated Wire 



Chicago Surplus 

1 1 3 04-2 60th Ave 
Trevor, Wise. 



One Mile West of 83 &C 
Turn North on 259iii 



m 



Mon-Fri 9-5pm 

Sat 9-3 

Closed J 2-1 Lunch 

262-862-2517 





INTERNET CLASSIFIEDS 

DON'T BE DEFT BEHIND 

100 word/ 90 days/ $175 
Banner Ad. / 90 Days / $250 

Discounts to Start Y2K 

1999 30% 2000 Jan 15% R'b 10% 



msriisicrrwE 

TECHNOLOGY 

847-740-9061 

I3IS1 •INCH VUTnC@AOL.COM 



DUCT MASTERS INC. 

EXPERTS IN AIR DUCT CLEANING 

& SANITIZING HI - TECH 

EQUIPMENT FAMILY OWNED AND 

OPERATED 

Increase efficiency of your 
syslein R saw energy 
llcHim: allergy, sinus & 
respiratory dlscHnifiin 

CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE 

847-940-9290 

Dryer Vent Cleaning 

• Free Sanitizing with tills ad « ($75 Value) 

H l l l lll l ll l ll l l lfll l lll llllll lH I IIMIMi tlll l ll ll ll lUH ii 




J Painting;jWallp>apering J 

% Expert Installation { 

[I Paper .•Fabric X ; Vinvl J 

mmRMmG 



(84^)#§95-8428 



*»*#.#,*, ^A********************** 



+7^Lo L**mu to *B*leanl 

You're always busy and cleaning is a chore.... 
Let us tidy up for youl 

We offer cleaning: 

•Weekly •Hi-Monllily •Monthly 

•Special Occasions &' Relocations 

- Very Reasonable Rates - Licensed, Insured, & Bonded 

- FREE Estimates - References Available 

PRO-MAIDS 

Professional Cleaning Service 

S,ac Kr' kL ' r ( 847 ) 514-6855 




Residential and 
Small Commercial 




DON'T THROW AWAY 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR 
LAMP DOCTORS 
FOR REPAIRS. 

WARREN ELECTRIC INC. 

33261 N. HIGHWAY 45 

WILDWOOD, IL 60030 

(847) 223-8691 




Personal Touch 

Residential (lenninu Service 



A Dclail Cleaning Evcrv Time 

"I'll Put A Sparkle In Your Home, 

& A Smile On Your Face" 

All Supplier Included 
Umliss<pja,L] soJutitim il»Il>Ii 



>e.w Home. Based Business 
Best I)ji\s Now Available! 
Cmilil' YmirHtime. I <>e-. 
Snnie Spivial Altcntinn! 



Ask for Desiree 546-0767 



CHAGALL MAID SERVICE 



Professional Home & 
• : Office Cleaning 



• Experienced crew 

• Best supplies 

• Best equipment 

• Best prices 
(888) 242-4255 
Insured & bonded 




• ROOF, SIDING AND WINDOW LEAK 
TROUBLESHOOTING AND REPAIR 

• ROOF INSPECTIONS {NEW & RE-ROOF) 

• CUSTOM RE-ROOF SPECIFICATIONS 



PHONE # 847-508-7148 

FAX # 847-587-6258 

E-MAIL: ResRoofCo@aoI.com ^SS^S 1 *™""™" 



MCUaEfl: 

. ROOF COMUaUNTS NlllTUlE (RCi| 

• MATIOKM. ROOrMO CONIRACIDHI A1IOC. 
(NCR*) 

• BUILOWO Of FKUU 1 CODE ADUINIlTFUTORi 
|BOC*J 



I THE SCOOP COMPANY } 5$^555255fcv$2% 

Pat Clean-ap Service j K fO Pli ACE » 

|g AN AD jg 

HERE 






-t 



I \ CAW, (847) | 

i BA7 Kf OJ.O, 1 ^ Y13-8161 S| 



Affordable Rates 
Weekly Service 



r ... 




A PRIVATE PARTY MERCHANDISE AD 



Name 



Address. 

Phone 

City 



State 



Zip. 



CLASSIFIED LISTINGS 



19.75 = 15 words or fewer, ono week, 15e each additional 

word. Ads will be seen in all 11 Lakeland Newspapers, The 

Market Journal, Great Lakes Bulletin and on the Internet. 



Please check one box below! 



DEADLINE: Wednesday 9:30 a.rri.>. 
Please allow extra time for orders 



being sent through maij\ 
Payment must be received with order. 



□ GARAGE SALES 330 

□ LAWN & GARDEN 348 

Q HOUSEHOLD MERCHANDISE 340 

□ APPLIANCES 304 

Q MISC. MERCHANDISE . : 350 

□ PETS 360 

□ WANTED TO BUY 370 

□ GIVEAWAY 120 

We'll help you get rid of your 
unwanted treasures. Your ad will 
reach 200,000+. It worksl Call 
(847) 223-8161 ext. 140 and ask 
for Lisa: The classified deadline is 
Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. 



□ BOATS & EQUIPMENT 710 

□ MOTORCYCLES ... 844 

□ CAMPERS & TRAVEL TRAILERS . . .704 

□ AUTOMOBILE LOAN & FINANCING .804 

□ VANS & TRUCKS 834 

□ AUTOMOBILES WANTED 848 

□ AUTOMOBILES FOR SALE 804 



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Drop ad off in our office from 8:00 am-5:00 pm Monday-Friday 



|ff30 S.~ Whitney, G rays lake, I L or fax to our 24 HOUR fax line at 847-223-2691 



* We are not responsible for ada received late that were sent through regular mail. 



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. .}/. 







progress 

for Lake County 



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PEOPLE PERSON 



LAW GRABBERS 



Page 17 



Page 29 



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Forefronts 





nrn ordinary jtap- water into crystal clear 



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Quality For Pennies Per 




: 



■ < : ■■ '•■■"■-■■■" -' - '- '.."'■ ' 



Forefronts 



Profile 



Jim Boyle 




ve educator 



m intervenes to help students succeed in school 




If I want to do a program, 

in a school district, 

I've got to get the kids 

out of there 

JIM BOYLE 

President of 

Ombudsman Educational 




chance conversation led Jim Boyle in a new career 
direction that has led young people down new paths. 

"I redirected my life," said Boyle, who is founder and 
president of Ombudsman Educational Services, 
headquartered in Libertyville. 



Boyle had been a teacher, dean, assistant superinten- 
dent and principal from 1957 until retiring from 
Mundelein High School district and mainstream educa- 
tion. 

Not ready to get out of education, as no "retired edu- 
cator" ever is, Boyle happened to be talking with former 
North Chicago Community High School Superintendent 
Lester Harman. 

"Les asked me if I knew anything about alternative ed- 
ucation," Boyle recalled with a smile, adding he was serv- 
ing as "an educational consultant," which basically means 
"an unemployed administrator." 

As it happened, Boyle recognized the need for such a 
program during his final years at Mundelein High School. 
Boyle had formulated the program and submitted it to the 
State of Illinois Department of Education through Bill 
Thompson, who at the time served as Lake County Re- 
gional Superintendent of Schools/ 

"I needed an alternative myself," Boyle said. "It 
worked out well for both of us." 

Boyle was born and raised in Iowa. After graduating 
from the University of Iowa with a master's degree in 
guidance, counseling and educational administration. Af- 
ter earning a K-,12 administrative certificate and serving 18 
years as a public school teacher and administrator, Boyle 
pursued Ombudsman. 

"The opportunity to educate in a different fashion 
than what was provided in the educational system" pro- 
vided Boyle's motivation to put together such a program. 

To accomplish this, it meant he would have to change 
the regular educational model. In the preliminary work, it 
was found students spent a lot of time sitting and listening 
to a teacher for 16 minutes in the regular educational 
model. To have success with students in an alternate 



model, Boyle said "a change in the educational system" 
was necessary. 

"If you're going to do something different with the sys- 
tem, you might as well do it with the kids who the regular 
system is unable to serve," Boyle said. "There's always that 
population out there in the terms of clientele." 

"You have to be a little bit of a maverick to try some- 
thing different," Boyle admits. 

The first Ombudsman program was initiated in North 
Chicago. It was at the original site "of the oldest gas station 
between Chicago and Milwaukee," Boyle recalled with a 
chuckle. Located at 10th St. and Sheridan Rd., the North 
Chicago schools and Ombudsman actually had to go to 
court to get the first site opened. 

ByMikeH.Babicz 

"It worked out fine," Boyle said, noting the first ses- 
sions were held in the 1975-76 school year. , 

North Chicago schools referred 25 students to the ini- 
tial site. Another 25 referrals came as a result of the Com- 
prehensive Employment Training Act, with a couple each 
coming from Zion-Benton Township High School and 
Highland Park High School, along with juvenile probation. 

The program works primarily with high school-age stu- 
dents up to around age 20. Since it is somewhat of a last ■ 
chance for many of the students, attendance is usually 
pretty steady. 

"It's the best kept secret in education," Boyle said, ad- 
mitting he is continuing to receive requests from school 
districts wanting him to come in and start a program. 

Since the initial sessions, Boyle's model is being used 
officially in 11 states with about 70 sites including those in 
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, Ohio, Maryland, Florida, New 



Hampshire, Colorado, Kansas, Arizona and Texas. During 
this school year, an estimated 3,000 students are benefit- 
ing from the program. Nationwide, Ombudsman employs 
between 250-275 staff. 

In Lake County, there are sites in Barrington, Gurnee, 
Libertyville, Lincolnshire, Wauconda and Zion. 

"It filled a need for students in the Chicago area," com- 
mented Vicki Bertsos, a third-year teacher and site director 
in Gurnee. "Ombudsman has definitely cornered the mar- 
ket." 

"Mr. Boyle came up with an idea which works well for 
students," Bertsos continued. "Obviously it's done well, or 
it wouldn't have lasted." 

Inquiries continue to come into Boyle's office. This 
year a call came from Seattle, Wash. 

"Now they come to us, and it's pretty much word of 
mouth," Boyle said of how the word gets around. "Some 
(school districts) choose to reinvent the wheel. In this 
time, kids need lots of options." 

There are times when Ombudsman is "fired" from a 
school district. "When one superintendent leaves and an- 
other comes in, they decide it's not their program and they 
can do it on their own," Boyle said. "That doesn't happen 
very often." 

"I could probably be a principal of any high school in 
the United States," Boyle said. "They're all basically alike. 
All of them have the same problem of the kids not fitting 
into the system." 

"The students obviously have problems in the public 
school," Bertsos explained. "This program removes them 
from that environment and has them starting fresh." 

Please see BOYLE / 4 



san 



Profile 



FROM PAGE 3 



Boyle 



"Some (states) have one program which indicates we 
can make a transportable model," Boyle said. "If you put 
in a good program with individuals which can be success- 
ful with the kids. We're the 
only ones who've ever done 
this." 

"The secret is smallness," 
Boyle explained. In a regular 
school setting, students are 
trying to fit in with 2,000-3,000 
other students or more. The 
Ombudsman program is 
geared to a student-teacher ra- 
tio of about 10-1, with most 
about 7-1. Students attend in 
three-hour blocks with sites 
offering two or three sessions 
during a day. 

"We still have to keep it 
small," Boyle said of the class 
sizes. "It's hard work. If it was 
easy, everybody would do it." 

"One of the keys is working 
with the students as individu- 
als, not in a class where they're 
just a number and arc part of a 
30-1 ratio," Bertsos points out. 

The completion rate for the 
program is around 85-90 per- 
cent coming to the program 
and not having to be terminat- 
ed. "If they don't make it here, they're not going to make 
it," Boyle said. "They've got the choice to make it through 
the program or not to attend." 

"Not all of the students have behavior problems," Bert 
sos said, reflected by some having missed school due to 
medical problems, having a baby or circumstances at 




home. "A lot of them realize and are thankful they have 
another chance in an alternative program." 

"When they graduate from our program, they go 

away with a positive view of 
education," Boyle said. 
"Some of them go on to col- 
lege and make positive 
changes. Unfortunately, 
some do go to jail. What are 
you going to do?" 

Kuytim (KJ) Jahja, a senior 
from Antioch, has been at- 
tending Ombudsman since 
the beginning of the 1999- 
2000. 

"I'd be failing if I was still 
in regular school," KJ said. 
"Here, I'm doing excellent." 

"I like being here. I can pick 
anything I want to do," KJ ex- 
plained, noting he can choose 
to work on all of his math on a 
particular day, rather than 
having to change classes. 
"There's no homework, and if 
I need some help, the teachers 
are able to try to help." 

"I thank Antioch Commu- 
nity High School for sending 
me here," KJ said. "With my 
grades I had there, I thought 1 
couldn't pass because of friends I hung around with and 
stuff like that. Since I came here, I concentrate and 1 know 
I can graduate." 

"I kind of like learning now," KJ admits with a big grin. 
"I learn new things at a pace where if I want to learn some- 
thing and spend the whole day,on it, 1 can, and I like that." 



Another mainstay of the Ombudsman program is to 
conduct classes away from a regular school campus. All of 
the Ombudsman sites are in business areas, with many in 
smaller strip malls. 

"If I want to do a program in a school district, I've got 
to get the kids out of there," Boyle emphasized. "They're 
turned off to the institution, even the bricks and mortar. 
Treating them differently is hard to do in a regular educa- 
tional environment. I tried it once, it didn't work, and I 
won't do it again." 

Boyle has seen attempts to replicate the program in a 
regular high school setting by using a smaller class size 
and student-teacher ratio. "It ends up driving costs crazy," 
Boyle said. 

"Truancy isn't a discipline problem, it's an educational 
problem," Boyle explained. "Some schools think if they 
buy computers, they have a program. There's something 
to be said for 25 years of experience. If you don't offer a 
good program, the kids won't come," 

"There are no miracles," Boyle added. "The way some 
turn out, it almost looks like there are. They surprise me 
and still surprise me even as old as I am." 

The curriculum is set up along catalogues of compe- 
tency with 80 percent basic skills and 20 percent social 
studies. Some science study is included on a limited basis 
due to the inability to have laboratory materials and exper- 
iments available. 

Although the Ombudsman program uses the same ba- 
sic format, attempts are made to individualize it. 

"We try and build the program around the student," 
Boyle explained. "Some of them don't want anything built 
around them which can become a challenge." 

"I continue to need to earn a living," Boyle said with a 
laugh about the reason he continues to head up the pro- 
gram with his wife, Loretta Sweeney, although admittedly 
contemplating retirement. 

Golfing and sailing help Boyle get away from it all. Om- 
budsman, and the children, are never far from his mind. 

"The factwe're helping more and more kids Is what 
keeps me going," Boyle said. "The bottom line is if you're 
not helping someone and doing what you want, you prob- 
ably shouldn't be doing what you're doing." 

In the case of Ombudsman, Boyle, a self- admitted 
"maverick," has built a program lasting nearly one-quarter 

century. And they're.still.comine- ~ '-.■« • -■■" '*■"'" 

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Forefronts 



Profile 



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Marge Keenan-Denniston 



Grandma Marge 

Marge Keenan-Denniston is active in education, 
business and politics— and she raised 9 children 




f the hundreds of Lake County 
residents who know her, many 
would agree that this is the 

perfect literary portrait of "Grandma 

Marge," formally known as 

Margaret Keenan-Denniston. 



The 72-year-old clerk of Warren Township lived 
on the north side of Waukegan for more than 65 years. 
Throughout her adult life, she has selflessly shared her 
time and love with countless residents of that community, 
particularly the children. 

"Adults (who knew her when they were children) still 
come up to her on the streets and ask how 'Grandma 
Marge' is doing," recounted Bill Denniston, who has 
shared the last six of his 80 years with Keenan-Denniston 
in their Gurnee home. 

Kcenan-Denniston's service! to the community began 
when she worked at Curlee's Drug Store and F.W. Wool- 
worth Co., while attending high school. Over the years, 
both of those neighborhood emporiums were relegated to 

By Sandy Hartogh 

the past in deference to parking lots, but she fondly re- 
members Friday nights and the downtown shoppers who 
passed through the doors of the hallowed dime store. 

After high school, Keenan-Denniston attended the Col- 
lege of Commerce of Lake County where she was recruited 
by Abbott Laboratories to train for an executive secretarial 
position. She worked as secretary to the director of chemi- 
cal manufacturing for the next thirteen years. 

Within that time, she met her first husband, Donald 
Keenan. Keenan-Denniston will tell you that her life began 
when she married Keenan in 1944. Her true calling as a 
servant to "the Lord's children" became increasingly ap- 
parent within their 45 years together. 

The Keenans raised nine children and were foster par- 
ents to many who could not be placed through the legal 
system. Their large Waukegan home became as crowded 
as the old woman's shoe in the well-known nursery rhyme. 
Keenan-Denniston resigned from Abbott to devote her 
time to the children. She recalled a time when she had four 
babies in diapers at the same time. Surely, that in itself 
would drive most young mothers to the brink of no return, 
but Keenan-Denniston stayed home until all of her chil- 
dren were old enough to attend school. 

During this period, she still managed to find the time to 
continue to be involved in education, of which she has 
said there is no end to learning. 

"With my education I find no reason for conceit be- 
cause half that I've learned I have forgotten and the other 
half is now obsolete," she quipped. 

She organized neighborhood moms, and together they 
developed a math program for the McCall School in 
Waukegan. She also started attending PTO (Parent- 
Teacher Organization) meetings on behalf of a neighbor- 
hood child whose own mother had died. 

"This little girl was so upset because she did not have 
anyone to attend the PTO meetings," explained Keenan- 
Denniston. "I told her I would love to go to the meetings 
for her, even though my own were still babies at the time." 

Later, when the children were older, Keenan-Dennis- 
ton went to. work at the McCall School, and then was of- 
fered the job of administrative assistant to the principal of 
Webster Junior High School. From there, she went on to 




teach night school classes at the, Waukegan Adult Evening 
School for 19 years. 

"Teaching night school was one of the greatest rewards 
of my life," said Keenan-Denniston. "I attended every 
graduation and watched my students, of all ages, receive 
their diplomas." 

As their children grew, the Keenans' home became a 
haven for the neighborhood kids/complete with a basket- 
ball hoop, pool table and Lionel train village. Their doors 
were always unlocked, said Keenan-Denniston, recalling 
the times she and Don would come home to find the base- 
ment full of kids. 

To teach honor and responsibility to the children, the 
Keenans instituted the "honor bowl." Every Sunday, they 
would fill it with $20 in quarters. Any child from their 
home or the neighborhood who needed extra money for 
the week could put their name in the bowl with the 
amount of change they "borrowed" from the kitty. They 
had until the following Sunday to replace the loan. 

Keenan-Denniston attests to the fact that the bowl al- 
ways balanced out, and sometimes even had extra money 



in it from children and their parents Who appreciated the 
Keenans' kindness and trust. She said the faith that they 
placed in the children made them all very responsible for 
taking care of their obligations. 

Lake County Circuit Judge Ray McKoski met Keenan- 
Denniston while she was secretary to Waukegan Mayor 
Haig Paravonian, following the death of Don Keenan from 
congestive heart failure in 1989. 

"Marge always had a desire to make the lives of chil- 
dren better," commended McKoski. "She always told me 
that culture was short on recognizing children and their 
accomplishments." 

While Keenan-Denniston was teaching and furthering 
her own education, Don Keenan opened the Greenwood 
Pastry Shop in Waukegan to provide a place for their chil- 
dren and other teens to work. It was here thar State Sena- 
tor Adeline Geo-Karis recalled first meeting Keenan-Den- 
niston. 

"Marge is a hardworking, dynamic woman of action," 

Please see GRANDMA MARGE / 6 



Profile 



Forefronts 



FROM PAGE 5 



Grandma Marge 



commented Geo-Karis, who has attended many of the 
fund-raisers Keenan-Denniston organized over the years. 
"She is a great volunteer who just loves people." 

Volunteer may be too tame a word to describe Keenan- 
Denniston. Her boundless energy, even in her golden 
years, is insurmountable. Warren Township Supervisor 
Suzanne Simpson referred to Keenan-Denniston as a 
"force unto nature." She warns that once you've met 
"Grandma Marge," you may be "grabbed by the ear and 
taken on the ride of your life." 

"Marge has an enormous capacity to get things done 
herself, and by getting other motivated people to help her 
accomplish things," explained McKoski. 

Indeed, the list of service organizations, as well as the 
awards and recognition Keenan-Denniston has reaped 
over the years would require at least two more newspaper 
pages to list. However, we will point out a few of the most 
notable. 

Keenan-Denniston is an extremely spiritual person 
who is very involved with her church. She and Don Keenan 
attended the Immanuel Baptist Church in Waukegan to- 
gether for 32 years. She was involved in the women's min- 
istry, the church nursery and Bible studies. When her hus- 
band died, she continued as a member of the church until 
she married BUI Denniston in 1994 and relocated to 
Gurnee in 1995. 

"Pastor Joe (of Immanuel Baptist) told me that he knew 
I was 'hooked' when he saw me helping Marge in the nurs- 
ery, " recalled Denniston, "but it was really the fried green 
tomatoes that did it." 

No, he's not referring to the movie "Fried Green Toma- 
toes." He met his active wife in the Waukegan Exchange 
Club, one of the many county chapters of the National Ex- 
change Club, which largely supports the prevention of 
child abuse. Denniston makes the rosters for all of the 
clubs throughout the county. 

In August 1993, he volunteered to drive Keenan-Den- 
niston to the airport to attend the club's national conven- 
tion. Upon her return, she wrote him a thank-you note and 






Marge always had a 

desire to make the lives of 

children better. She always 

told me that culture was 

short on recognizing children 

and their accomplishments 

RAYMcKOSKI 
Lake County Circuit Judge 



invited him over for a dinner of fried green tomatoes, 
which happened to be his favorite. That led to once-a- 
week dinners, which ultimately led to a trip down the aisle 
in February 1994. 

In 1995, the happy couple began attending the Village 
Church of Gurnee, immediately becoming involved in 
every aspect of their new parish. 

"Marge and Bill are the kind of people I wish I could 
clone," said Village Church Pastor Todd Habegger. "They 
work with the children and, their.own peers to keep them 
connected with the Lord and the church. They are a won- 
derful addition." 



Keenan-Denniston's own children have grown and 
moved to other parts of the country (except her youngest 
son, who remains in the area), and she admits she cannot 
even count how many grandchildren she has. However, 
her involvement with organizations such as the Exchange 
Club, the United Way, the Foundation for the Prevention 
of Child Abuse, the American Business Women's Associa- 
tion, the Grayslake and Waukegan Historical Societies, the 
Lake County Woman's Coalition and the Salvation Army 
(of which she is the chairwoman), have not dampened her 
love and desire to help the little ones in our society. If any- 
thing, these public service groups enhance and expand her 
work with society's youth. 

There are two little girls from Lake Villa whose story 
could perhaps sum up Keenan-Denniston's commitment 
to public service. 

Kylie Bieszczat, 8, was diagnosed with a brain tumor 
when she was just 6. She and her family are members of 
the Village Church of Gurnee. "Grandma Marge" did not 
know the Bieszczats until she heard of Kylie's illness. She 
immediately organized a prayer chain and procured a fi- 
nancial gift from the Grayslake Exchange Club. She be-- 
came Kylie's "surrogate grandmother" throughout her 
two-year battle with chemotherapy and radiation, visiting 
her regularly. Keenan-Denniston even presented Kylie's 
parents with a restaurant gift certificate and forced them 
to take a break while she and Bill Denniston stayed with, 
die sick child. 

According to Kylie's mother Marian, she has been 
cancer-free after undergoing an operation to remove the 
tumor. Sadly, the Bieszczhes' four-year-old daughter, 
Kristi suffered an unexplainable stroke last July, leaving 
her temporarily paralyzed on the right side of her body. 
True to her nature, "Grandma Marge" returned to the 
family's side full force to help them nurse Kristi back to 
health. 

Keenan-Denniston has received many accolades in her 
long career as a public servant, the most recent being the 
Exchange Club's 1999 Distinguished Service Award, which 
has always been awarded to men in Lake County. . . until 
now. However, she would like to be remembered as "a 
woman who loves the Lord and has served Him with glad- 
ness, and thanked Him daily for the love He gave me in His 
children and my ability to love them." 

"My Christian belief is the baeiB of my life," concluded 
Keenan-Denniston. "When 1 can't serve with gladness, 
then I will not serve." 



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Ace in the h61e 





Teaching allows Michele Drinkard 
to take game to next level 



|_J inding one's niche in life can be an 
I: exhausting journey. 

J- For Knollwood Club's Assistant 

Golf Professional/ instructor Michele 
Drinkard, 36, it seemed destined that hers 
would lie somewhere within the golf arena. 

She was first exposed to the game at a 
very young age, 5 to be exact. 



;■-■• - ■ -■■ .' 



By John Phelps 



"I was raised by a single mother, so I spent a lot of 
time with my grandmother (Edy Drinkard)," she recalls. 
"She was the only one in my immediate family who played 
golf. She took me to play, set me up with lessons from a 
golf professional and I started taking a liking to the game. 
It began to grow on me." 

After a successful college career and a tour in the 
pros, Drinkard has teamed with HealthSouth to offer a 
service to golfers with physical challenges, helping them 
learn to play while minimizing the effects on their bodies. 

Born in Tuscaloosa, Ala., Drinkard and her mother 
lived in Augusta, Ga., Germany and California before fi- 
nally moving back to her family's home in Cullman, Ala. 
Drinkard attended Cullman High School and it was there 
that her dedication and growing passion for the game 
would pay off, to the tune of two high school state cham- 
pionships. 

After her first state championship, she was ap- 
proached by the University of Alabama's head golf coach, 
Conrad Rehling. 

"Paul (Bear) Bryant had read in the paper that I won 
the state my junior year," said Drinkard. "So he sent the 
university's golf coach down to see if I wanted to play col- 
legiately for Alabama. I'm a die-hard Crimson Tide fan 
and it was a dream of mine to play for Alabama. I went for 
a recruiting visit, met 'Bear' Bryant, and basically said, 
where do I sign?" 

Drinkard, who was named captain her senior year, 
turned in four solid years playing for the Tide. After gradu- 
ating in 1986 with a BS in business administration, she 
didn't know what route to take. 

"While at Alabama, I had aspirations of playing on the 
LPGA Tour but wasn't sure if I could make it," said 
Drinkard. 

She began working for her grandfather in the family 
business, Drinkard Developers, a company that develops 
commercial real estate, primarily shopping centers. 

But after a year the golf bug, again started getting to 
her. 

"I decided I couldn't stay indoors," she said with a 
chuckle. "Plus, I really missed the competition." 

So, with financial assistance from her grandfather 
and his friends, it was time to enter the world of profes- 




sional golf. 

Drinkard turned pro in 1987 and for three years 
played on the Futures and European Tours as well as a few 
Australian events. During that time she tried earning her 
LPGA card but was unsuccessful in three attempts. 

"That's kind of when I realized that I wanted to 
teach," she said. 

. She landed her first assistant's job at Westmoreland 
Country Club in Wilmette, working for then-head profes- 
sional Gary Binder and entered the PGA apprentice pro- 
gram, eventually becoming a PGA member in 1994, 

Following four years at Westmoreland, succeeded by 
a year at Inverness Club, Drinkard accepted the assistant's 
position at Knollwood Club to study under head profes- 
sional Sherm Finger. 

"During the four years that I worked for (Gary) 
Binder, I was able to establish a solid foundation on which 
to build my career," said Drinkard. "Sherm has been a 
great influence throughout my life and has used that 
- foundation to mold me into the golf professional that I am 
today. I am very thankful to Sherm and the Knollwood 
Club for the continuing opportunity to establish myself as 
a golf teacher." 



Basically, teaching 

allows me to give back to the 

game. It's rewarding and 

satisfying to be able to 

pass along the knowledge to 

my student It's even 

more rewarding when they 

come back and tell you how 

much they've improved 

MICHELE DRINKARD 
Golf instructor 





This spring will mark her fifth season at the private fa- 
cility, located in Lake Forest. 

While at Knollwood, Drinkard 's instruction of the 
game has reached great heights, especially in the last five 
years. 

With her deep knowledge and passion for the game 
coupled, she joined a company called HealthSouth. 

HealthSouth is the sports medicine provider for the 
PGA, Senior PGA, LPGA, PGA of America as well as the 
American Junior Golf Association. 

The goals of the HealthSouth Golf Program are to im- 
prove golf performance and decrease injury while en- 
hancing overall wellness through proper stretching, 
strengthening and postural exercises. Improved body 
mechanics, flexibility and strength will reduce the risk of 
sustaining significant injury. This program is designed to 
be used as a resource by both professional and amateur 
golfers. 

The hope is that, armed with the knowledge of a 
golfer's anatomical strengths and deficiencies, it will be 
easier for the teaching professional to fit an individual with 
the appropriate swing mechanics to help reduce the risk of 
injury while playing golf. 

"Every golfer's swing is unique. But the difference be- 
tween a professional golfer and an amateur golfer is that 
the pro has mastered the swing technique," said Doug 
Miller, this region's HealthSouth Golf Specialist, based in 
Arlington Heights. 

"The amateur needs to master the rotation required 
in the golf swing. In most cases, this is accomplished 
through improving flexibility, balance, strength and pow- 
er," he said. 

Five years ago Drinkard, was introduced to Miller 
through HealthSouth's National Golf Director, Hank 
Johnson. 

"Michele didn't have any hesitations about joining 
us," said Miller. "She evaluates a respective student's • 
swing and based on her findings, refers them to me 
where I assess potential limitations. That enables her to 
modify what corrections to make in the golfer's swing. It 
also helps tailor her instruction based on my anatomical 
analysis." 

Please see ACE IN THE HOLE IB 



■ II I 



Profile 



Forefronts 



FROM PAGE 7 







in the hole 



Once the physical aspect is addressed, Drinkard has a 
strong base to work with and can now modify the studen- 
t's golf swing. But it doesn't stop there. 

Enter the world of technology. 

"While in Alabama, I was very fortunate to have the 
opportunity to observe teaching professionals instructing 
students in the Golf Digest Learning Schools at the North 
River Yacht Club," Drinkard recollects. "I watched great 
teachers like Bob Toski, Paul luinyan, Davis Love, Hank 
Johnson and Peter Kostis all give lessons. They all used 
cameras. That's what helped me learn about the golf 
swing." 

Through computerized video, Drinkard's students 
are able to practice the correct movements by looking 
into a monitor sitting on the ground in front of them. Af- 
ter a swing has been performed, the student can look 
back into the monitor to observe any corrections they 
are trying to make. 

"The ability of the instant playback feature on my VI 
system is incredible," says Drinkard. "The hoodman, 
which is the flap that covers the monitor to block out the 
sunlight (like those used for instant replay in the NFL), al- 
lows for the student to view instantly necessary correc- 
tions in the swing. The computerized system enables us to 
store a student's swing for future comparisons so that he 
or she can see how they have progressed with their golf 
swings. Since 85 percent of learning is visual, this technol- 
ogy provides instant results." 

Drinkard said that many golf instructors now use 
similar equipment in their teachings. 




Since 85 percent of learning 
is visual, this technology 

like to take provides instant results 

my program 

levelwl^re MICHELE DRINKARD 

we have an Golf Instructor 

instructional 
station and a 

practice station set up indoors," she explains. "Hitting 
into a net indoors using the VI 's playback feature 
would enable us to re-train a student's motor skills, 
thus allowing them to concentrate on the mechanics 
instead of the result of the shot. Then, we could open 
the bay doors, lift up the net and hit onto the range 
outdoors from the same spot so that we could concen- 
trate on the ball flight and results. The additional prac- 
tice station would allow my students to have supervised 
practice with the aid of the instant playback feature to 
continue practicing before their next lesson." 

Drinkard, who plans on playing in more Illinois 
PGA section events as well as trying to qualify for the 
U.S. Open, says this technology has enhanced her 
teaching, 

"Basically, teaching allows me to give back to the 
game," she said. "It's rewarding and satisfying to be able 
to pass along the knowledge to my students. It's even 
more rewarding when they come back and tell you how 
much they've improved," 

With technology and a genuine mind for the game, 
Drinkard has indeed found her niche. 







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Forefronts 



Profile 






Charlie Foy 



1 




no more 




was 
awildyouth 
—until mentors 
showed him the way 



ByAngelaD.Sykora 



Sometimes you want to go 
where. everybody knows your 
name. 
Charlie Foy has only to step out- 
side his front door to find his 
"Cheers." 

Embraced by a community he 
has helped to make better, the acting 
police chief of Round Lake is never 
without enthusiasm for life, a wicked 
sense of humor and adoring friends. 



If the Village of Round Lake were Bedford Falls, Foy 
would be its George Bailey. It is after all, A Wonderful Life. 

"I love the village. I know everybody," said Foy. "If I 
go to a call, 75 percent of the time, I know the people." 

It would not be so far-fetched to say Foy has had an 
angel on his shoulder. 

. As a rebellious, Harley Davidson-riding young man, 
Foy's life could've taken just about any turn except the 
one that leads to success. But, the underdog gripped the 
handlebars of his hog as tight as he could and steered 
himself in the right direction. 

Foy was born in Chicago. His mother was a telegraph 
operator who commuted daily from Union Station, often 
working 12-hour days to support her son. Foy found him- . 
self alone most of the time. 

"I raised myself. From as far back as I can remember, 
I cooked for myself, dressed myself and got myself off to 
school." 

Back then, said Foy, baby-sitters were almost un- 
heard of. 

"It wasn't her fault; she was a great mother. It made 
me very self sufficient." 

His father, who was a writer for the Associated Press, 
was not a constant Fixture in the Foy household either. He 
was an alcoholic, who Foy said abused his mother. 

"Domestic violence is my pet peeve. I have no respect 
for men who.hiLwomen," said Foy. 



His parents later divorced when Foy was a teenager. at a gas station when he was 16. 

When he was 30, Foy found out by accident that he "He taught me values," said Foy. The man would later 

was adopted. His mother never had any intention of telling secure Foy a managerial position with Eagle grocery 

him, because she wanted her son to always believe he was stores, 
hers. Foy attended Grayslake High School. After graduation, 

"The bottom fell out of my psyche," said Foy, who be- he studied journalism at the College of Lake County and 



gan questioning his mother about the adoption until he 
saw how much it hurt her. 

"It put mom in a frenzy. When I saw how much the 
conversation hurt her, I resolved myself to the fact that if 
she was nice enough to adopt me, I was going to drop the 
issue," said Foy. 

Foy's mother died in 1997, at age 92. He still yearns to 
find out about his birth parents, and whether they are still 
alive. He wants to know why they gave him up, if he has 
any siblings and what nationality he is. 

"Right now, I celebrate every holiday," laughed Foy. 

At the age of 10, Foy's mother moved him to West 
Miltmore, near Lake Villa, hoping it would be a better in- 
fluence on him. 

However, the self-proclaimed "wild child" found him- 



earned an associate's degree in English literature. He is 
currently finishing his bachelor's degree in criminal justice 
and plans to earn his master's. 

"You can't get enough education," he said. 

Becoming a cop was not exactly Foy's life goal, but 
something he would later discover he was cut out for. 

Former Lindenhurst Police Chief Bob Gordon, who 
has since died, became Foy's second mentor. 

"He hired me right off my Harley. He said he needed a 
street-wise guy in the department," said Foy, who first ac- 
cepted the job for the excitement it could offer. 

Gordon gave Foy great insight into police work, and 
how to be an adult. 

"He taught me how to dress, talk and walk" said Foy. 

One piece of advice that has always stayed with Foy 



self in trouble often. He liked drag racing and was once ar- was how a cop's entire career was worth it if he could save 




rested for disorderly conduct on a motorcycle. 

"I had free reign because my mom worked all the 
time," said Foy, who admitted to being a big partier, but 
never a big drinker. Suffering through his father's alcohol 
binges proved to be a sobering lesson, so to speak. 

Growing up, Foy envi- 
sioned himself becoming a 
teacher and also showed in- 
terest in photography, some- 
thing he does semi-profes- 
sionally today. 

"People's faces are the 
most interesting thing on the 
planet. I'm fascinated with the 
human race," he said. 

Writing was another passion, and probably the only 
trait he will attribute to his father, who died in 1968. 

"When he was sober, he was an excellent writer," Foy 
said of his father. 

For a time, Foy wrote science fiction books, but quit 
when one of his books was stolen by a publisher, leaving ' 
him to foot a hefty IRS bill. 

As a teenager, Foy said he lacked self-confidence, the 
result of not having a strong father figure in his life. 

The first of two men whom Foy credits with being a 
mentor, was a man named Harold, who hired him to work 



Charlie has always been 

there whenever I needed him 

on behalf of our kids 

DR. MARY DAVIS 
District 116 Superintendent 




even one kid from going bad. 

His future as a cop was confirmed the day he arrested 
a child molester and saw how he helped a family and com- 
munity. 

"That showed me I could be someone," he said. 

At one point, Foy held 
down three jobs. He worked 
as a part-time officer for both 
Lindenhurst and Lake Villa, 
and managed the meat de- 
partments of several Eagle 
grocery stores in the area. 

In order to put his two 
children through college, Foy 
had to drop out of police 
work and concentrate on his retail job, which he kept for 
20 years. 

Foy's son Chuck, is a Grayslake police officer. His 
daughter Kristin works in merchandising and sales. 

"I always wanted kids," said Foy. "I went overboard 
and spent every minute I could with them." 

He made his daughter a tomboy, and got his son, a . 
former Mr. Illinois, into weightlifting. 

"My dad never played ball with me or taught me table; 
manners. He never did a lot of things," said Foy. 

Please see REBEL 1 10 



10 



Profile 



Forefronts 



FROM PAGE 9 



Rebel 



Chuck's decision to become a cop "flabbergasted" Foy 
and filled him with pride. 

"There's no better compliment to a father than a son 
who wants to do what he does for a living." 

Foy moved from West Miltmore to the Round Lake 
area in the mid 1980s and rediscovered his passion for po- 
lice work. 

He worked for Round Lake Heights, eventually trans- 
ferring to Round Lake, where he began climbing through 
the ranks from part-time to full-time, sergeant to lieu- 
tenant. He also headed the department's two-town drug 
unit with Round Lake Park for three years. "I loved that 
work," he said. 

In 1998, Chief Joe Trkovsky went on disability leave. 
Foy was next in line for chief and has served as acting chief 
since. 

For Foy, police work is far from boring. 

"No two calls are the same," said Foy, who also works 
for the Lake County Major Crime Task Force. 

While it is true that law enforcement has its share of 
cynics and jaded officers who've seen so much bad they've 
forgotten the good, Foy believes in people and his commu- 
nity. 

"Round Like people arc real people. They work hard 
and they play hard. They're kind people who come out of 
the woodwork to help each other," he said. 

Foy recalled a time being the only officer in the mid- 
dle of a bar brawl, and how residents came to his aid. 

"That's the kind of people you have in Round Lake," 
he said. 

According to Foy, he and his fellow officers are like 
family. "You become close." 

Hound Lake Police Commander Mike Bock described 
Foy as "the kind of guy that'll do anything for you." 

"He's got a big heart, and a soft-spot for anything kid- 
related," he added. 

That is not the first time this sentiment has been 
neard. His presence in Round Lake School District 1 16 is 
strong and appreciated. His relationship with the students 
is not one of fear and intimidation, but of mutual admira- 



tion and respect. 

"My goal is for these kids to come up and say, 'Hey 
Charlie!,' share their problems, and ask for advice," Foy 
said. 

He cannot pass through a school hallway without be- 





People's faces are the most 
interesting thing on the planet 




CHARLIE FOY 
Round Lake Police Chief 



ing noticed or approached by students who greet him by 
name and with a smile. 

"It's hard for people to see cops as friends," said Foy, 
which is why he is so proud that not only students, but 
many of the community's residents, are genuinely happy 
to see him coming. 

"The kids in this high school will be adults in this 
town. They'll be running the planet. You have to guide 
them through," said Foy. 

"America's youth is the key to everything. We have to' 
be therefor them." 

District 116 Superintendent Dr. Mary Davis credits 
Foy with helping the schools through tough times like 
bomb threats and when the high school cheerleaders were 
threatened on the Internet. 

"Charlie has always been there whenever I needed 
him on behalf of our kids," said Davis. 

"He always thinks of our school district first, and the 
Round Lake area kids first, before himself, which is phe- 
nomenal." 

"I can't think of anybody better I'd rather work with to 
protect our kids," concluded Davis. 

Foy is a firm believer in protecting his entire commu- 
nity and has long been an advocate of community policing 
and improving department conditions for his officers. 

"A lot of our job is to make people feel safe," he said. 

If he had the funds, he'd put an officer in every school 
in the district, and probably a patrol car on every block. 

"Charlie brings a lot of things to the table. He's very 
progressive," said Bock. "He's very open to suggestions on 
how to make things better." 

Appreciation awards and words of praise aside, Foy 
strives to be a good cop doing his job, doing the best he 
can for his officers, his residents and their children. 

"The greatest feeling is to be appreciated," said Foy. 

"I'm enthusiastic about the future, the human race 
period. I'm enthusiastic about the Village of Round Lake, 
its growth, the change in young people, their maturity and 
the relationship we have with the public, " he added. , 

"It's better than it's ever been," he concluded. 



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Forefronts 



Profile 



11 



Susan Grant 




oJ tf/ii/i 



As executive director ofCASA Lake County, Susan Grant has her priorities straight 



A hundred years from now it will not 
matter what my bank account was, 
the sort of house I lived in, or the 
kind of car I drove but the world 
may be different because I was important 
in the life of a child." 

That saying can be found in the office of Susan Grant, a 
woman who has helped make a difference in the lives of 
numerous Lake County children through her work with 
CASA: Court Appointed Special Advocates. 

But if there is one child in particular who receives her 
attention, it's her 14-year-old son, Danny. When asked 
what she does in her spare time, the conversation gravi- 
tates toward him, as well as her husband, Timothy. 

"Family always comes first," Grant explained. "It's al- 
ways been a priority." 

By Michelle Habrych 

As executive director fdr CASA Lake County, Grant is 
extremely busy working to publicize the nonprofit group, 
which provides a needed voice in court for abused and 
neglected children. 

"Ail of us wear a lot of hats, so it's a lot of hours," Grant 
explained of her job. "And that's one of the things I always 
struggle with." 

Danny Grant admires his mother's commitment to 
CASA, "I think she does a good job balancing a lot of differ- 
ent responsibilities at work," he said. "When she comes 
home, she leaves it all at work and tries to have fun with us." 

The family enjoys the many opportunities in the area 
to do things together. Since their son is involved with ten- 
nis, the Grants spend many weekends at the Libertyville 
Tennis Club. Grant and her husband now team up against 
their son, since he's developed his skills as a player. Dan- 
ny Grant explained, "They used to beat me all the time, 
and now I'm starting to beat them more." 

Another way the Grants spend time is with Phoenix 
and Heath, a border collie and a Bernese mountain dog. 

"We go for walks with the dogs to the forest preserves 
in our area," Grant shared. "We just spend time together." 

Grant enjoys living in Wadsworth, where the family has 
resided for the past 10 years after a job change for Timo- 
thy moved them from Massachusetts. 

"It took awhile to get used to the Midwest," she admit- 
ted. "On the East Coast, we had a lot of trees, and the 
houses and lots were larger than they are here. So when 
we moved here it was kind of a shock that roads were so 
straight. It's so easy to find everything." 

She continued, "We love it. The people have been ab- 
solutely wonderful. We've found that everyone's so 
friendly and so open — from the minute we moved in." 

The Grants also spend time together while traveling. 

Most recently, the family went to Australia to visit 
Grant's sister's family who lives there. The trip was 
Grant's favorite, as it was her for son, who enjoyed seeing 
how his cousins and aunt and uncle lived. On the 14-hour 
plane ride, Danny Grant said he spent a lot of time talking 
with his mom. She and Danny share a special bond, ac- 
cording to Grant. 

Additionally, Grant and her husband enjoyed many 
overseas sights when his job took him there before the 
couple started their family. 

"The biggest memory that I have of traveling that had 
the most impact is when we went to Paris and we got to 
the Eiffel Tower," recalled Grant. She said it was amazing 
just to be there. 

She also remembered an "interesting" cab ride in 





Greece. "He must have been 
going 90 mph on the road. We 
thought we were going to die," 
she said. 

"One of the things that we 
like to do if we go to a differ- 
ent country or different area is 
to do something that's typical 
of the area," Grant explained. 
"So many times people go to 
Europe and then go check out the McDonald's restaurant. 
We want to go to whatever the local pub is." 

When she first moved to Wadsworth, Grant worked in 
the circulation department at the Warren-Newport Public 



My son and my husband 

come first It's not a hard 

choice for me to make 




SUSAN GRANT 

Executive Director for CASA 

Lake County 



Grant is also an avid read- 
er, especially of new fiction. 
"I like to kind of just get lost 
in a novel," she admitted. 

"We used to read together • 
when Danny was younger," 
she recalled. "We'd read to 
him at night, but we don't do 
that anymore. I kind of miss 
those days now that you 
bring it up." 

Her love for her son is obvious as she reflects on the 
past and present, "I learn daily from him," she said about 
Danny, now a freshman in high school. "I'm amazed at the 



Library. "When I was growing up, my mom told me, 'When things that he's taught me about- patience, acceptance." 
you move to an area, the first thing you should do is go get Danny is aware of his mother's hard work and sacri- 

your library card.' And so I did," she said. "So it was a great fice. He sees CASA's work as a good thing for helping 

way to meet people and she actually was right." children, but he said of his mother's limited free time, "I 

She further explained, " [My mom] was a real avid read- don't think she does a lot she wants to do because she's • 
er, and she felt that the library was like a central location in 
the community." Please see CHILD LIKE / 12 




12 



Profile 



Forefronts 



FROM PAGE 1 1 



Childlike 



always thinking about us." 

"My son and my husband come first," said Grant. "It's 
not a hard choice for me to make." 

While society focuses on self-enlightenment, Grant 
says she sees her role as a mother as her most important. 
"It really changes you, becoming a mother," she said. 
"He's a great kid. I'm really very fortunate." 

Grant has a rich heritage, with relatives who came over 
on the Mayflower and an aunt who belongs to Daughters 
of the American Revolution. 

She grew up in Topsfield, Mass., the same town as her 
mother and her grandmother. "It was how you'd picture a 
normal New England town, the church in the center of the 
community," she said. 

Her family was a close-knit group, with one tradition 
that took her husband by surprise. "When you have your 
birthday — I don't know where this started from — the per- 
son's whose birthday it was nose got buttered. So that the 
big thing was, sometime during the day, someone had to 
butter your nose during your birthday and it would bring 
you good luck for the rest of the year," she explained. "And 
when my husband first came into our family, the first 
birthday celebration," she laughed, "I forgot to tell him 
this little tidbit. And he was like, 'What are they doing?' 
and I said, 'Oh, it's just one of those family things.' Every 
family has something." 

Other family traditions for Grant involve Christmas, "My 
mom always had my sister and I bake a whole bunch of 
Christmas cookies and then we delivered them to all of our 
neighbors and then also to people who were in nursing 
homes," said Grant. "I'd like to continue that tradition." 

Grant treasures a recipe file dating back four genera- 
tions. "I don't make very many of them," she admitted, 
but she enjoys being able to see the different penmanship. 

She first read about CASA in 1993. At the time, Grant 
was in the process of completing her law degree from 
Northeastern University in Boston, Mass., a school that, 
Grant explained, concentrates on training students to go 
into public interest and the nonprofit sector of law. The 




school required stu- 
dents to complete four 
work/educational co- 
ops, so Grant saw CASA 
as the perfect opportu- 
nity to earn her degree 
and be of service to the 
community. 

"I found that after I 
had a child, I became 
much more aware of 
children's issues that 
were out there. I began 
to read more about 
abused and neglected 
children and really felt 
that's where I could 
combine a desire to do 
something for those 
kids along with my law 
background," she shared. "CASA seemed to be a good fit." 

Grant volunteered as an advocate in 1993 and, after the 
training period, was assigned her first case in March 1994. 
Unlike social workers, the advocates are not tied to a set of 
regulations or procedures. 

The advocates aire trained to be independently objec- 
tive, Grant explained. "Our mandate is simply the best in- 
terests of the child." 

She was given the challenge of helping a judge decide 
what was best for a cocaine baby and his three siblings. 
She remembers there was a happy ending to the case in 
that an aunt stepped up to take care of the children. "But it 
was also sad because the mom wasn't strong enough to 
overcome her addictions," recalled Grant. 

Before the case was finished, Grant joined the CASA 
staff as a case manager. So when the case was closed, she 
did not take on any others. 

When asked if volunteers ever contact the children they 
were involved with after the case is settled, Grant said that 
CASA strongly discourages it. "We want the families to be 
able to get on with their lives," she said, "and that's some- 
times hard because you would really like to find out what 
happened." 

CASA was started in 1977 by Seattle Judge David 
Soukup, who believed he needed more information on 
cases involving children in order to make the best decision 
for the child. Advocates appointed by the court would help 



judges by providing in- 
sight into the case. 

Grant explained that 
in 1993, CASA was 
brought to Lake Coun- 
ty because "case leads 
were just growing and 
the case workers were 
overworked." 

She has seen CASA 
change in the past six 
years. "We've grown 
from a grassroots or- 
ganization into a more 
professional organiza- 
tion," Grant said. 

Acceptance of CASA 
has also grown. She 
said, "The judges are 
real supportive of our 
program now." 

"And now our sole function and mission is to recruit, 
train and supervise volunteers to become court appointed 
special advocates, so everything we do surrounds that 
mission. Our long-range mission is to be able to provide 
an advocate for each child," Grant explained. 

Currently, there are about 900 children in juvenile 
court, said Grant, "and we're serving less than a third." 
Danny Grant recently helped his mother make a bul- 
letin board to display the statistics. He was surprised to 
see how many children still need advocates. His future 
plans are to possibly become a lawyer, "so 1 can help peo- 
ple, (just like his mother)" Danny Grant said. 

CASA Lake County Board President Barbara A. Weiner 
had much to say about Grant. "Speaking up for the most 
vulnerable members of the community, abused and ne- 
glected children, has become Susan's life work. She is very 
effective at what she does and has enabled CASA Lake 
County to grow so that we are able to provide an advocate 
for even more children," said Weiner. 

"If only the world were blessed with more Susan Grants, 
it would be a far better place," Weiner commented. 

"One of the things I've learned from our volunteers is, 
as I get to know them, they all have so much to offer, and I 
think that if we just give people a chance we could learn so 
much from them," said Grant. 

And she is one of those people we could all learn from. 



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Forefronts 



Profile 



13 



Phil Mazur 




Libertyville's Phil Mazur has taken up 
the fight for those who fought for us 



I ave you ever done anything that you believed in?" It's 
■*■*■ ■*■ a question Phil Mazur likes to ask. Perhaps the most 
important person he has asked it of is himself. The answer led 
him to fight for those who fought for us. 




ByTimODonnell 

There is a sign displayed at the North Chicago VA education and I wanted to go teach school. All of a sud- 

Medical Center that reads,"! believe the way society treats den, I got a notice from my draft board back home saying, 




its veterans is an indication of who we are as a nation." 

"If this is the case," Phil Mazur wrote to the Lake 
County Board, "then this country is in poor shape." 

Mazur is one of the leading activists in the fight to 
save North Chicago's VA hospital. Through his efforts, 
Mazur has pushed this issue into the forefront of the 
minds of Lake County's community. He has even gotten 
area politicians involved to the point where the VA hospi- 
tal's level of service is becoming a-plank in several U.S. 
Congressional candidates' 
platforms. 

After meeting Mazur face 
to face, it's easy to see how 
persuasive the man can be. 
Upon arriving for our inter- 
view, Mazur was on the 
phone and visibly irritated by 
a Chicago Tribune article 
about a VA rally held the day 
before. He viewed the story as 
negative. Mazur's passion for 
what he believes is right dri- 
ves him. Anything, even a 

short article in a newspaper, that hinders him from reach 
ing his goal ignites a passion that makes Mazur want to 
fight. 

The Stanford, Conn, native came to the Midwest to at- 
tend Marquette University in Milwaukee, in hopes of be- 
coming a school teacher. In 1962 Mazur joined the Navy 
to avoid being drafted into the Army. 

"At the time, I, like many others, did not want to go 
into the service. We weren't at full-scale war yet, but it 
was coming. But that didn't bother me. I had a degree in 




'you're on the list,'" recalled Mazur. 

Taking the advice of Marquette's Naval ROTC officer, 
he joined the Navy because "it's better that you go into 
the Navy, eating hot food and sleeping in a nice, warm 
bed instead of sleeping on the ground and eating cold C- 
rations." 

After officer's training, Mazur went to sea for 18 
months as a First Division officer and was later taught to 
be a front-deck weapons officer, or as he put it, "a trained 

killer." Mazur said he has 
never shot at anyone. 

For the second part of 
his tour, Mazur was assigned 
to Great Lakes Naval Train- 
ing Center, where he coordi- 
nated the correspondence 
for the Naval Advancement 
Exam. 

Since then, he has 
stayed in the Lake County 
area, making his home in 
Libertyville and working as a 
realtor in Lake Bluff. 
"As I discovered Lake County, I found it to be the land 
of opportunity," he said. 

What has ignited Mazur's latest passion is a decision 
made by the Veterans Integrated Service Network 12 
and North Chicago VA Medical Center Director Joan 
Cummings to discontinue a majority of the services of- 
fered by the hospital. The plan called for inpatient med- 
ical and surgical care to be taken out of the hospital and 
consolidated at the Hines, Westside and Lakeside hospi- 
tals in Chicago. Because Hines is the next-closest facili- 



Ifyou kick veterans out, 

you don't need people, 

you don't need money 

andyoudon't 

needfacilities 

PHILMAZUR 
VA Activist 



ty, the North Chicago staff commented in a written 
statement that the welfare of the long-term care patient, 
both geriatric and psychiatric, will be severely compro- 
mised. 

Soon after, Mazur got involved. 

"On May 30, there was a rally in front of the VA hospi- 
tal on Memorial Day. At that time there were statements 
made that really shocked me," said Mazur. "That's when I 
really got on the ball and started doing something about 
the tragedy that we've had to endure since then." 

What Mazur heard at that Memorial Day rally were- 
some truly shocking statements by veterans that accused 
the hospital of shutting its doors to the very people they 
were supposed to be helping. 

"At that time we found out that, for one thing, Joan 
Cummings and/or the VA had instituted a system of 
awarding bonuses to employees for kicking veterans out. 
If you kick veterans out," he said, "you don't need people, 
you don't need money, and you don't need facilities." 

Mazur began writing letters to the Lake County Board 
telling them, "Veterans are not being cared for as they 
were told they would be. Promises and contracts have 
been unilaterally broken by those bureaucrats who are 
employed by us. It is as if we who have paid for these ser- 
vices are continually battling those whom we are employ- 
ing — that includes both elected officials and those hired 
to run the system." 

The county board listened to what Mazur had to say, 
and they and other area municipalities drafted resolutions 
in support of saving the hospital and sent them to the 
United States Congress. 

"Since then, we've been out there making sure that 
people get to understand what is happening. The reaction 

Please see VETERAN / 14 



14 



Profile 



Forefronts 



FROM PAGE 13 



Veteran 



that I got was, 'I didn't know this was going on.' Well now 
you know, so let's do something about it," he said. 

At his office in Lake Bluff, Mazur has accumulated a 
file drawer full of correspondence, flyers and informa- 
tion about the hospital closing. It is a culmination of 
months of work — attending meetings, talking to the me- 
dia and the stream of letters addressed to local, state 
and federal politicians. All of his time is devoted to his 
cause. 

"The main objective of this is to alert everybody about 
what is happening. It's not only the hospital, but there are 
also other insidious things that the people in Washington 
have done to veterans," Mazur commented. "The closing 
of the hospital is just one little tiny blip on the landscape 
of the erosion of the entitlements that veterans have 
earned." 

Because of his involvement, Mazur does not have time 
for his job and the other activities he is involved in, in- 
cluding volunteer work at the hospital, involvement with 
the Amateur Athletic Union through which he referees 
volleyball matches and involvement with the Midwest 
Young Artists. 

For now, Mazur focuses all of his attention on the in- 
justices done to veterans, of which the hospital closing is 
just the tip of the iceberg, he said. 

But why? Why spend so much time and give up so 
many other things to go up against a gigantic bureaucra- 
cy? To, as Mazur said, fight an enemy that hears from 
many angered Americans who ask for, but never receive, a 
small piece of social justice? 

"Have you ever done anything you believed in?" Mazur 
asked. "Found it is worthwhile, even though you might 
not have achieved your goal? Well, same here. We may not 
be successful, but that was one of the options we had to 
face when we started the fight." 

What drives Mazur to fight for the hospital is a combi- 
nation of respect and fear. 

When he and others joined the service, they were 
promised free medical care. Under a contract with the 
United States, veterans signed up to sacrifice years of their 



life, — sometimes all of those years — 
and in return, they are entitled to cer- 
tain things, Mazur believes. The con- 
tract that he signed needs to be re- 
spected, and that the men and 
women who signed those contracts 
deserve respect, as well he said. 

"Every veteran has protected the 
rest of the people in this country. 
There are millions of people who 
don't even know what the military is. 
But yet right now, look at all the guys 
who are out there patrolling the seas 
and who are in areas of the world 
where they shouldn't be," said 
Mazur. "In return, we probably de- 
serve nothing different from anybody 
else, except the acknowledgment that 
you are a veteran, and that if a con- 
tract was executed, let's hold to that 
contract." 

Mazur is also driven by a fear. It is 
a fear that he and other veterans like 
him may die because they could not 
be transported to the proper medical 
facility in time. 

"We're fighting for our lives here," Mazur said with an 
urgency that defines the passion that drives him. "What if 
I get sick today? If I have to get transported to Chicago 
right now, what's going to happen? Do you know how 
many people are going to be dead with a transportation 
system like this?" 

He has accomplished his first goal; articles such as 
this one have worked to open the public's eyes and ears. 
The next step is to get the public involved, he said. 

"Why the hell are we fighting this battle that we're 
fighting? We shouldn't have to do this. There's no reason 
for it, no sense for it," said Mazur. "Do something. Get on 
your phone; get on your fax. Let's start another letter-writ- 
ing campaign and tell these guys in Washington to stop 










treating veterans so badly." 

Because he is a humble person, Mazur will not admit , 
that he has personally made a difference. He is even hesi- 
tant to admit that he was more active in the community 
than most people. The fruit of his activity is evidenced by 
the fact that Mark Kirk, a candidate for the 10th District 
United States House of Representatives, came to Mazur 
looking for information on the VA hospital fight. Soon af- 
ter, Kirk and Mazur organized a rally where Kirk made sav- 
ing North Chicago a plank in his political campaign, 
thrusting this issue in front of every other political hopeful 
from the area. 

"I certainly think an impact has been made," admitted 
Mazur. "We've opened up a lot of people's eyes." 



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Forefronts 



■'«">( 



Profile 



■15 



Rosemary Mers has been 

spreading the word 

about Wauconda, 

and a little sunshine, 

for. 30 years 




Inform 



By Steve Peterson 



f the position of honorary 
ambassador for Wauconda is ever 
■ created, Rosemary Mers would be 
the ideal candidate. 



Family, organizations and politics keep Mers, who re- 
tired from the restaurant business a few years ago, on the 
run. Ambassador of Waugonda would be a perfect job title 
for the grandmother. 

Last summer, she welcomed three generations of the 
Mers family to her home near the shores of Bangs Lake. 
Her daughter, Dona Sefferi, gave her a photo album enti- 
tled "This is Your Life," complete with pictures of many of 
Rosemary's grandchildren and great grandchildren. 

Well-known in political circles, Mers serves as trustee 
on the Wauconda Township Board. She is coordinating 
the township's 150th birthday celebration this year. Mers 
is also secretary for the Lake County Township officials 
group and is active in Women In Government (WINGS). 
On the social scene, Mers is active in the Jetsetters Grand- 
mothers Club. 

Thousands have visited Mers at her place of business, 
Mers Restaurant. The Mers family was the fifth owner of 
the restaurant, which traces its heritage to 1909. 

Overlooking Bangs Lake, Mers helped run the success- 
ful business until the sale to Biloxi Grill two years ago. 
Mers is always willing to mention the beautiful view her 
residence has of Wauconda's best-known feature. 

"Joseph Cardinal Bernardin once came to the restau- 
rant with a big group of 70 priests. Three of the members 
In the Grandmothers Club were waitresses," Mers said. 

"We always tried to make it so that this was their big 
family night out. We treated people like family," she said. 





Mers' son, Bob, helped out as a cook. Bob is still in the 
restaurant business and once made the Guinness Book of 
World Records for stacking champagne glasses. One 
daughter, Sefferi, is a deputy sheriff for DuPage County 
and is a fourth-degree martial arts black belt. Mary Eliza- 
beth, another daughter, lives in Orange, Calif. 

Mers is close friends with many in politics in Lake 
County. U.S. Rep. Phil Crane (R- Wauconda) is a frequent 
guest in her house — but the discussion is families, not 
politics. 

"We worked together in various committees of WINGS. 
She is just one of those people you want on your side. She 

(This is) what grassroots 

government is all about 

Township government is the 

closest to the people. Ms 150 

years old and the oldest— long 

before there were mayors 

ROSEMARY MERS 
Township board trustee 

is dedicated and talented. Rosemary is always smiling. I 
have never seen her in a bad mood. She is a very positive 
woman," said Lake County Coroner Barbara Richardson, 
who has known Mers for 20 years. 

Mers now is the secretary for WINGS. The group's ef- 
forts includes scholarships. 

"I met her at a WINGS meeting. She was on the other 
side in my last election, but she was very gracious and 
open-minded. She is a loyal supporter and friend of mine, 
which is very rare in politics," Lake County Board Rep. 
Bonnie Thomson Carter (R-Ingleside) said. 



"A lot of women have served in politics. I love working 
as a trustee and with the great people at the township," 
Mers, who admires the late Jacqueline Kennedy Onasis, 
said. 

"Whenever you need a volunteer, she is right there. She 
is very helpful In a lot of areas. She is secretary of the Lake 
County Township officials. They meet once a month and if 
I can't go, she is always there," said James Keagle, Wau- 
conda Township supervisor. 

Mers came to the Wauconda Township Board as an 
outsider, the only one of her party to win election six years 
ago. 

"(This is) what grassroots government is all about. 
Township government is the closest to the people. It is 150 
years old and the oldest — long before there were mayors. I 
feel it is real important — it takes care of the community's 
needs," Mers said. She believes there should be competi- 
tion for all public offices. 

She said Gerald Beyer, now deceased, helped her at her 
early township meetings. During elections, she is busy 
serving as an election judge. 

Mers is also co-chairman of Bonnie Thomson Carter's 
re-election effort for the Lake County Board. 

"Rosemary Mers is a great asset for Wauconda. I met 
her when I first moved to Wauconda in 1971. She gives 
time to so many organizations. She always helps, without 
asking why," Wauconda Mayor James Eschenbauch said. 

Mers devotes a lot of effort to the Jetsetters Grandmoth- 
ers Club. The group helps youth and holds a picnic for vet- 
erans at North Chicago's VA Center. "The community real- 
ly supports us," Mers said. 

At one point, she was the youngest national office hold- 
er in Grandmothers Club. Her mother, Marie Donahue, in- 
spired her interest. 



Please see AMBASSADOR 1 16 



16 



Profile 



Forefronts 



■ 



FROM PAGE 15 



Ambassador 



"She has done much for the club," Jan Thomas, the Jet- 
setters vice president, said. "She is very enthusiastic." 

Another of Mers' community projects was the distribu- 
tion of about 40 Christmas baskets at Wauconda Township 
Hall just before Christmas. 

"It was very good. It is very much needed for people. 
Some people donated Christmas trees. The businesses and 
groups were very supportive. It gives you a wonderful feel- 
ing. So many people thank you because otherwise, they 
would not have anything to give to their children. It is very 
emotional," Mers said. 

The Mers' restaurant was famous in Lake County and 
was run by the family for more than 30 years. It was fa- 
mous for holiday gatherings and contests of all kinds for 
youth. 

"I really enjoyed it. I loved the people and miss them. 
We came in 1958. We were all young. It was a beach hotel 
which was built in 1909," she said. 

The Chicago-born Mers was happy with her career as a 
registered nurse. She had earned a degree at an Oak Park 
school of nursing. Then die family noticed the Tudor 
Beach Hotel was for sale in Wauconda and purchased it. 
. Settlers would come to die hotel area after riding on the 
Palatine-Lake Zurich railroad, which stopped at the pre- 
sent police station site on south Main St. 

Mers has become a true believer in Wauconda. She eats 
at local restaurants, shops locally and even has all her re- 
furbishing work done by Wauconda firms. 

"All my kids grew up here. I believe in keeping it here in 
town and the tax dollars help all. My husband always used 
to say to buy local— even if it means to pay a few more 
cents," Mers said "I only go to Jewel or Dominick's in town 
to shop, and buy hardware at Wauconda Paint & Glass," 
she said. 

She is active in groups at Transfiguration Church as 
well. 

"I worked as a nurse and then became a mother," Mers 
said. She worked at Oak Park Hospital's emergency room 
for three years. 

"There was a fire at a store once, and there were 20 pa- 




3 

D 

8 



as 
O 



tients all at once. I was always interested in nursing, I 
loved my nursing career," Mers said. 

Mers met her husband, Robert Mers, when he was a 
student at Northern Illinois Teachers College. "A friend of 
his introduced us and they had a bet If I would go out 
with him," Mers said. 

The Mers were married for 33 years before Robert died 
in 1987 at age 56 from a heart attack. 

The restaurant business continued until 1996, when 
Mers sold the popular Bangs Lake eatery. 

"Our last night was New Year's Eve 1996. It was 



tough to be with the customers for the last time. The 
waitresses were all supportive. I miss the customers," 
Mers said. 

After a recent 10-day vacation in Orange, Calif., to 
visit her daughter Mary and her. family, it was back to 
work for Mers, planning the township's sesquicenten- 
nial. 

"We are getting a lot of good cooperation, hoping to 
make Sept, 17 a fun, family day," Mers said. 

Given Mers' track record, that should be a celebration 
Wauconda will not want to miss. 



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Forefronts — 



Profile 



•17 







By Neal Tucker 



Tim Perry has carved himself a life at the heart of capitalism- 

where humanity and money meet 




Whether he is wearing the hat of village trustee, 
banker, economic development commissioner, 
chamber president or neighbor, a chat with Tim 
Perry definitely gives one the feeling he is attuned 
to what is go on in the streets of his community. 

Growing up on a rural Indiana farm near 
Lafayette, Perry's formative years were not as iso- 
lated as one might suspect. His dad was not a 
farmer but rather a John Deere dealer, selling 
farm implements to farmers in the area. Farmers 
came from all around to purchase from the family business. 

When the economy turned sour in the late 70s with high 
interest rates and rampant inflation, his dad's business was 
still busy servicing equipment when sales on new imple- 
ments slowed down. 

The work was hard but Perry, his two brothers and a sis- 
ter were well- provided for. 

"I watched my mom and dad and how hard they worked 
to provide for us. They worked constantly yet they were al- 
ways there for us," Perry recalled. 

When he graduated from Clinton Prairie High School- 
Rural Rte. 6 in Frankfort, he mentions in order to emphasize 
his bucolic upbringing— he headed south to Indiana State 
University in Terre Haute where he would major in finance. 
He was at the university during the height of NCAA basket 
ball frenzy with the home team, led by a country boy named 



im Perry is a man who loves to talk to people. He 
loves talking about talking to people. Even the books and 
movies he prefers are primarily character studies. 

. It is no wonder, then, that his life's choices constantly 
put him in a position to deal with people. 



Larry Bird, going undefeated during the regular season in 
1979. The economy, however, was not as successful and Per- 
ry was a finance major who knew he wanted to get into the fi- 
nancial world. 

He graduated into a cold, harsh realm. The year, 1981, 
was the height of the recession, spawned during the Jimmy 
Carter presidency and continuing into Ronald Reagan's first 
term in the White House. 

What that meant to a kid fresh out of college in a world 
where the prime lending rate was 21 percent was plenty of 
interviews and paying of dues. 

"I probably had 30 interviews with banks and brokerage 
firms," Perry recalled. "My first job was making collection 
calls, consumer loans and repossessing cars and TVs." 

After two years, he went to a large Champaign, III. bank 
for more of the same, except for the potential to grow. In his 



nine years at the bank he was a collector, 
collection manager, consumer loan officer 
and assistant vice president. In tough finan- 
cial times, it took a lot of scratching and 
clawing to grow personally as well as grow 
the bank. But Perry was up for the job. 

"I did everything along the way. I started 
as low as you could get. I probably did 200 
car repos myself," he said. ' 
During this time he was also bitten by the 
bug of commercial lending. The recurring theme in all his ex- 
perience was his interaction with people. This included an- 
other life-changing experience while he was at the bank. He 
met his future wife, Betsy, a teller at the bank. She later 
worked in the same building after earning her master's de- 
gree in Labor and Industrial Relations. 

The two married in 1984 as Perry was looking to diversify 
his experience in banking. It is said that some of the most 
successful people are risk-takers, and Perry and his wife were 
about to take a huge one. He accepted a position as executive 
vice president and senior lending officer for a Moline, 111. 
bank. When inspecting the bank's existing loan portfolio, 
Perry could have been likened to a relief pitcher coming into 
the eighth inning with his team already down by three runs. 

Please see PEOPLE PERSON f 18 



18- 



Proflle 



Forefronts 



FROM PAGE 17 



People person 



"It was a clean-up position really, the 
loan portfolio was not well," he said, exer- 
cising succinct understatement. ' 

The move was strictly a resume builder. 
Not only was he leaving for a lateral- 
salaried job, but his wife was leaving a good 
job with no prospect of one at all in the 
quad cities. She did hook up with a large 
corporation and Perry was successful in 
turning the loan portfolio around, but life 
was fraught with challenges. His father, 
who had died in 1998, had given him some 
advice that was never more pertinent than 
during those two years along the Mississip- 
pi. 

"Don't take yourself too seriously. Most 
of what we are doing right now is not life or 
death," Perry said, recounting the advice. 

As fate would have it, about the time 
Perry had originally planned to move on, 
he was contacted by an acquaintance of an 
acquaintance of an acquaintance regarding 
a new banking position opening up in Lake 
County. 

The Miles family was building a new 
banking facility in Grayslake and wanted a 
person experienced in hands-on banking 
to head up that facility in addition to the 
one in Lindenhurst. Perry was their choice 
for vice president of facility operations for 
what has now become three banking loca- 
tions. 

Since coming to Lake County, he has 
lived in a Grayslake home. He saw and 
heard great things happening in the vil- 



lage and jumped in with both feet. He has 
been a member of the economic develop- 
ment commission, is a member of the 
Lake County Workforce Investment Board, 
is currently serving his second year as 
president of the Grayslake Chamber of 
Commerce and is a four-year trustee on 
the village board of trustees along with 
various other committee activities. He and 
his wife also had two children in the past 
six years. 

And though the interview for this arti- 
cle was promised not to be a Barbara Wal- 
ters special— where the interviewee always 
ends up weeping, the conversation invari- 
ably returned to his late father and the im- 
pact he had on Perry's life. 

He recounted that his dad rarely used 
foul language but his nuggets of wisdom 
stood out because they cut through in plain 
simple language. Then, the memories be- 
gan to stream by in his head. He began to 
share one. 

"In fact, one of the dearest memories of 
my dad . . ." he doesn't finish his sentence. 
A glance up from note-taking doesn't re- 
veal a bank vice president or village trustee 
but instead a son, eyes welling up, over- 
come with wonderful memories of a man 
gone many moons ago. 

"I thought I was over that," he said after 
a I5-second pause. 

Obviously, even when you really like 
people, some still tend to stay with you 
more than others. 




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yet iHey were x a' 
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Forefronts 



Profile 



19 





g *e children 



I 



C 

^^ itting in front of a very large 
VJ wooden desk, in a chair that 

matches the desk in both color and 
size, Mary Shahbazian looks a little out of 
place — a petite woman sitting at such a 
large and intimidating platform/located in 
a very grand and beautiful home. 



The building serves as offices for the agency Shahbaz- 
ian works for. She may look out place, but make no mis- 
take, Shahbazian is right at home while watching over the 
agency she's been credited with saving. 

' Shahbazian started out at Allendale around 1986 as a 
special education teacher and then moved on to work as a 
mental health specialist at the Waukegan Developmental 
Center. She returned soon to Allendale and quickly rose 
through the ranks, switching to a director of educational 
programs after only a few years. But for the last two years 
Shahbazian has taken on a new position as president of 
the Allendale Association. 

i The Allendale Association is a not-for-profit organiza- 
tion for troubled youths and their families. Located in 
Lake Villa, it sits on a 120-acre piece of land. Young adults 
from all over Lake, Cook and McHenry counties attend 
classes at the Allendale campus. Some actually live there. 

Shahbazian explained why she was interested in get- 
ting involved with a line of work that concentrates on 
helping others. 

"Both of my sisters are teachers so I guess I kind of 
followed in their footsteps," Shahbazian said. "I've always 
kind of been interested in people or groups in need." 

Telling a story of how she started caring for animals 



By Michael Bivona 



while growing up on a farm, it's easy to see the passion 
Shahbazian carries for helping people and animals. 

"When t was little, I set up a small medical center in 
my parents' basement. I was in charge of taking care of the 
hurt animals we found on the property," Shahbazian ex- 
plained. "I think I'm just attracted to children's or animals' 
issues." Now that she's in a position to make a few 
changes, Shahbazian is trying to take advantage of her 
time as president. 

"I'm trying to use my position to be able to be a very 
strong advocate for the kids. We need to have a training 
program for the staff so they can better deal with the chil- 
dren," Shahbazian said. "Hopefully I can inspire people to 
change the kids, to let the kids know that they can still 
have a positive and powerful outcome to their lives." 

She is in charge of the entire staff at Allendale as well 
as between 250 - 300 students. 

"Sometimes it's frightening when I think about it," she 
explained. "I think, 'Oh my God.' But if you do your best 
and surround yourself with the appropriate people who 
support what you're doing, the work will get done." 

Recalling her first stint at Allendale, Shahbazian ex- 
plained how the agency is not like other jobs. 

"I never expected to be in charge of an agency like 
this," Shahbazian said. "There's something about Allen- 
dale that gets inside you. I feel very committed to this 
place." 

Taking over for a president that lasted only a few 
years, Shahbazian wants to give some longevity to the po- 
sition. "I'd like to be president of Allendale for a long time" 
she said. "A place like this needs stable leadership. I think 
we're about there." 

The few employees that Shahbazian works closely 
with at Allendale see the dedication she brings to work 
with her every day. 

"She's brought some very innovative ideas to Allen- • 
dale," Chris Schrantz, vice president of finance at Allen- 





Rising throu0Mhe ranks 
at Allendale Association, 
1 Mary Shcitibazian 



brought 



the group stability 














dale, said. "We've worked together for about two-and-a- 
half years and everything she does, she does with the kids 
in mind." 

Bonnie Griffin, Shahbazian 's secretary for the last year 
and a half, believes Shahbazian cares a lot about Allendale. 

"She's very dedicated. Her heart is in her job and is 
definitely with the children," Griffin said. 

One major thing Shahbazian is constantly trying to ac- 
complish is raising money for the Allendale Association. 

"We're looking to build," she explained. 

A greenhouse was built just a year ago and Shahbaz- 
ian is campaigning to have a new vocational center built 
next to it. 

According to Shahbazian, the vocational center would 
be for educating interested students on automobile body 



She's very dedicated. 

Her heart is in her job 
and is definitely 
with the children 





BONNIE GRIFFIN 
Secretary, Allendale Association 

work and basic auto mechanics. The center would include 
a car wash, tutorial work shops for lower-functioning stu- 
dents and a home economics area, such as a cooking area. 

"We'd like to open it up to the local schools for the ap- 
propriate students," she explained. 

The greenhouse is in its first full year of operation and, 
according to Shahbazian, is already quite successful. 

"It's fabulous. The kids just love it" she said. "They are 
so motivated to learn about it and participate in it." 

Shahbazian stated that the greenhouse serves as 
much more than just simply a place for students to learn 
to plant. 

"They (the students) make things to give to other peo- 
ple," Shahbazian said. "It makes them feel very valuable as 
people." 

-- Shahbazian also mentioned that adding a gift shop to 
the greenhouse is a possibility, so that students can sell 
things to the community. 

As was the case with the greenhouse, the vocational 
center would be entirely funded by private donations. 

"We have some very loyal friends out there who turn 
dreams into reality," Shahbazian explained. 

When depending upon the public's financial help in 
supporting programs and development, Shahbazian ex- 
plained that keeping Allendale on the public's mind is a 
tricky situation. 

"We want to have the support of the community but 
we also want privacy as well," she stated. "We don't want 
the kids to be on display." 

Lack of stability and a failure to keep the organization 
at the top of the public's mind contributed to a lack of 
funds. Though Shahbazian is reluctant to discuss the past 
and believes she has been given too much credit for the fi- 
nancial turnaround of Allendale, the stability she has 
brought has made a big difference. 

Wanting to stay close to her roots as a farm girl, Shah- 
bazian and her husband, Charles, live in a house in Paris, 
Wis., about 10 miles north of the Illinois border. The house 
is complete with animals. 

"What actually drew me to the house was how it re- 
minded me of where I grew up," she said. "It's a beautiful 
farm community." 

She explained that she has cats that stay in the barn all 
year. 

Please see SAVING THE CHILDREN 122 



20 



Forefronts 






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PHOTO BY SANDY BRKSSNER 



22- 



Proffle 



Forefronts 



FROM PAGE 19 



Saving the children 



"We put an electric blanket out there for them in the 
winter, "Shahbazian said. "Whenever we go out there look 
ing for them we know right where they'll be." 

Although Shahbazian's immediate family consists of 
her and her husband, she still has plenty of other family 
'"members to surround herself with. 

"I'm very close to my extended family. 
My sister's kids are my kids, " Shahbazian said. 

She explained that outside of work she 
likes to read, bicycle and spend time with 
friends and family, but for the most part, is 
simply a homebody. 

"I'm a news junkie and a political 
junkie," she stated. "I'll stay up all night dur- 
ing election night." 

Shahbazian also said that once a year • 
she likes to go to Washington, D.C. and lob- 
by for children's rights. 

If you're walking through the bookstore 
in the next year or so, don't be surprised if you 
run across a book Shahbazian has written. 

She and Larry Brendtro are working to- 
gether to write a book. According to Shah- 
bazian, Brendtro is interested in the Allen- 
dale mode] of having education meet the ba- 
sic needs of the children. 

"I think it's great," Shahbazian said. 
"Having the opportunity to do something 
like this with someone so well known is 
very exciting." 

Shahbazian said that she is hoping the 



There's a lot of good 

in this world and 

we have to build on it 



IViary Shahbazian 
President, Allendale Association 






project will be completed in the next 12 - 18 months. 

When asked about that which she's most proud of 
her work at Allendale, Shahbazian responded, "It's hard 
to think of one thing I'm personally proud of. Everyday. 
I'm proud I'm a person in a position to make a differ- 
ence. It's the day-to-day things. The little 
things you do that add up. Not the one big 
thing you can do." 

Shahbazian told a story about a conver- 
sation she once had with Lake Villa Mayor 
Frank Loffredo. 

"He said that some towns have steel and 
some have grain, but we have kids," Shah- 
bazian said. "With Central Baptist and Allen- 
dale, Lake Villa specializes in children." 

When explaining about what Allendale 
does for children, Shahbazian uses an analo- 
gy of a physical ailment. "You can die from a 
scratch if you don't clean it up," she said. 
"We're like an emotional emergency room 
for children." 

Shahbazian is extremely optimistic as 
she leads Allendale into the new millenni- 
um. 

"One of the wonderful things for the 
new century is the progress we're making in 
this field. A whole world will open up for us 
as far as enlightenment in the area of men- 
tal illness," Shahbazian explained. "I'm very 
hopeful. There's a lot of good In this world 
and we have to build on it." 



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I 



Forefronts 



_ 



Profile 



23 



Gail Svendsen 



Heads 



in 




'This long weekend package 
really creates — in the minds 
of the consumer — the feeling 
that there is so much to do in 
Lake County. The goal is to get 
them to spend more time here 
and stay overnight, therefore 
putting heads in beds. That's 
what we'jejall about!, 

GAIL SVENDSEN 




ail Svendsen is a dynamo. As a 
reporter arrives in her office for a 
mid-morning interview, she ex- 
udes energy. She is also organized. Neatly 
laid out on her desk are the essentials, in- 
cluding a biography, tourist map of the 
county and other information. 




In response to a question, Svendsen reveals that she has 
been at work since 7:30 that morning when she attended a 
breakfast meeting. She will be at it until about 10 p.m. Gover- 
nor George Ryan is due to speak at the Green Oaks, Liber- 
tyville, Mundelein, Vernon Hills Chamber of Commerce. It is a 
must-show event for a mover and shaker. 

Some days she and staff members are on the 6 a.m. train to 
Chicago for meetings. 

Organization is her stock in trade, It was the key skill she 
used when taking a pivotal role in developing the Lake County 
Convention and Visitors Bureau in 1984. It was then that 
Svendsen and the other county leaders saw an opportunity 
when then-Illinois Governor James Thompson signed into law 
the state's first tourism budget. The money was to have been 
shared on a matching basis with convention and visitors bu- 
reaus across the state. The one catch-the bureaus that would 
share in the largesse had to have been founded by a certain 
date in 1985. The founders didn't have much time to act. 

At the time, Svendsen was active in the Lake Forest Cham- 
ber of Commerce. She also had three children at home, ages 1, 
2 and 3. She was fully content to stay at home and care for her 
children, but the opportunity proved to be too great. As an ac- 
tive chamber member and former bank manager and with 10 



years of not-for-profit leadership, Svendsen clearly saw the 
economic potential that an organized tourism industry could 
afford Lake County. 

"I planned to be a stay-at-home mom. This challenge ap- . 
pealed to me," Svendsen said. 

The Illinois State University graduate was invited to join the 
Waukegan Exchange Club, an organization of which she is very 
proud. Svendsen was one of the first female members and its 
first female president, "You'd have to drag me away from that 
group," she said. 

By Robert Warde 

She and the staff have been able to build the bureau into 
the grease that turns the wheels of a true economic force in the 
county. Tourism expenditures in Lake County were $680 mil- 
lion in 1998, There are about 9,000 people employed in the in- 
dustry and sales tax receipts of $36 million are sent to the state 
each year. About $14 million stays in the county in the form of 
local sales tax. Lake County's tourism industry is the third- 
largest in the state, behind only Cook and DuPage counties. 
"We would likely be No. 2, but we don't have a convention cen- 
ter," Svendsen said. r 



Svendsen works hard to make time for her family. When 
she signed on as a staff member of the Lake County Conven- 
tion and Visitors Bureau, she worked part-time. By the middle 
of 1985, she was employed full-time. 

It shouldn't come as a surprise that, for the most part, 
Svendson's family life works pretty well. "My kids are pretty in- 
dependent," she said, giving the impression that the trait is 
hereditary. 

Svendsen even made short work of training her dalmatian, 
Lindy. "I asked around, and found out that dalmatians are in- 
telligent dogs. Someone told me to walk her around the 
perimeter of our backyard and she would stay on our property. 
It worked. She is the perfect pet," she said, only half-believing it 
herself. 

Svendsen and her husband Larry, a senior vice president at 
the Bank of Waukegan, have worked hard to maintain balance 
for themselves and their children. She has made time to attend 
extra-curricular events that the three— Matthew, 18, Kristen, 17 
and Andrew, 16— have been involved in. 

In fact, the children have come to the office or to the bu- 
reau's promotional events with Svendsen in order to spend 

Please see HEADS IN BEDS 124 



24 



Profile 



Forefronts 



FROM PAGE 23 



Heads in Beds 



time together. Even her mother gets into the act, having taken a 
ride in a hot-air balloon the bureau used as a co-promotion 
with Wauconda Orchards. "We'd get into the air and she would 
shout, 'Come to Lake County,"' Svendsen said. 

Svendsen's mother resides in a nursing home now, but the 
two managed a trip to her mother's native Austria. 

Though the trip started off on a disappointing note- they 
discovered that the day of their arrival in Obendorf, her moth- 
er's ancestral hometown, was a holiday and no official public 



records outlet was open, so Svendsen began networking. 

Svendsen approached a policeman who spoke enough 
English to guide her to the home of someone who knew one of 
the mother's cousins. Through meeting with family member 
after family member, the pair was able to discover much about 
their roots. 

They visited graves and saw the sights, piecing together the 
family's history. They even discovered the home that her 
grandmother was born in. 




"It was still in tact, we were.so thrilled," Svendsen said. 

Svendsen took advantage of the trip to test the autobahn. "1 
can't say how fast I was going, but I tested the speedometer. I 
felt like James Bond." 

Taking chances is also a trademark trait for Svendsen. 
There were no assurances that when the bureau was formed 
that local communities would agree to the kind of teamwork 
she believed was necessary to make it successful. 

"It's been a real growing experience to see them coming to- 
gether," she said. 

Working together is essential to the strategy Svendsen has 
crafted for the bureau. By promoting several events from 
throughout the county, Svendsen believes that convincing 
tourists to spend long weekends here is the best way to maxi- 
mize the promotion the bureau does. "This long weekends 
package really creates— iri the minds of the consumer— the 
feeling that there is so much to do in Lake County. The goal is 
to get them to more spend time here and stay overnight, there- 
fore putting heads in beds. That's what we're all about." 

The insight Svendsen gains from her own busy life con- 
tributes to her marketing success. 

"Families are busy. They don't take two-week or even 
week-long vacations anymore. They take long weekends, get- 
aways. That is why promoting events and attractions as pack- 
ages is so important. If we can convince a family to pack their 
bags and spend three days with us, we can get them to the at- 
tractions, to shop and spend nights in hotels and motels," 
Svendsen said. 

Svendsen said that one of the things that makes her proud- 
est is the fact that the bureau's staff is able to get so much ac- 
complished with a "lean" staff. Though she wishes there were 
more income for the bureau- the $1.5 million spent each year 
comes in the form of $650,000 from the state to match revenue 
from local government. 

Svendsen said she is grateful for the entertainment taxes 
municipalities such as Gurnee provide each year, but she does 
regret that some of the funds do go into general coffers and that 
more of it doesn't reach the bureau. 

The challenge and variety of leading the bureau appeals 
greatly to Svendsen. She said she has about 20 projects going at 
any one time: 

"Every day is different. I'll stay as long as they let me. It's • 
(the tourism industry) just snowballing, I don't see it slowing 
down," Svendsen said. 

Should tourism'ever slowdown, Svendsen isn't likely to' fol- 
low suit. "It's a passion. It really is." 



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■29 



Development 




.nnexation — the mere word can invoke a broad 
spectrum of reactions from cold sweat to eyeballs popping 
with dollar signs. This common and sometimes coercive practice 
used by villages to increase their size by snagging adjoining land 
from unincorporated areas, has led to an intense race for land 
within Lake County. 



According to figures based on the county's tax parcel 
maps, about 60 percent of the county is already incorpo- 
rated. Urban sprawl, a term that first appeared in 1958 to 
describe planned commercial and residential develop- 
ments that went beyond the boundaries of a city, is quick- 
ly displacing the rural charm and open space offered by 
unincorporated sections of Lake County. Who are the ul- 
timate winners in this land grab contest— and what price 
did they pay? The answer depends on whom you ask. 

"Annexations are good for the community," says 
Gurnee Mayor Richard Welton. 

Welton, who has served as Gurnee's mayor for the 
past 27 years, is widely reputed to share the title of "King 
of Sprawl" with former chairman of the Lake County 
Board, Bob Depke. His view on annexation is that it can 
broaden a community's tax base, promote economic 
growth and bring amenities, such as sewer and water 



Greed is the motivation for 
annexation. Mayors and 

village boards should now 
pause. They are not only 

destroying farmlands and 

woodlands— they are 
destroying quality of life 








MIKE GRAHAM 
Libertyville Township Supervisor 



services, to its residents. 

Stuart Meek, a growth specialist with the American 
Planning Commission in Chicago, said the overall general 
tendency for annexations is, "in a nutshell," the water and 
sewer services that urban areas.can provide. 

Welton's vision for his village led to the development 
of a "comprehensive plan" that has not veered much off 
course since its conception in the early 1970s. During the 
course of Welton's long term, Gurnee has annexed over 
300 parcels of property. This feat has no doubt put 
Gurnee at the forefront of the land grab race. 

"I don't remember ever forcing anyone to annex with 
us," stated Welton. "They've always petitioned us." 

Perhaps this is true, but Gurnee, like most villages, is 
not beneath enticing developers to annex with promises 
of tax increment financing (TIF), lower school impact 
fees, sales tax sharing and waived assessments, such as 
road improvement fees. 

According to Welton, the developers of the Gurnee 
Mills mall were offered a sales tax sharing incentive that • 
spanned 10 years. The formula involved a graduated 
scale, per calendar year, in which Gurnee received 100 
percent of the first $500,000 in sales tax revenue. The de- 
veloper received 25 percent of the next $500,00 to $2.5 
million. Thereafter, any revenue that exceeded $2.5 mil- 
lion was split 50-50 between the village and the develop- 
er. Welton maintained that the incentive was good for the 
village because the developer used the sales tax revenue 
to "make public improvements" within Gurnee, particu- 
larly along the Grand Ave. corridor. 

This same program is offered to car dealerships who 
might have otherwise shied away from Gurnee, albeit the 
graduated scale has lower thresholds than that of Gurnee 
Mills. 

"We have attracted major name stores with this incen- 
tive," said Welton. "Gurnee has never had a car dealership 



until the last year or two." 

Libertyville Township 
Supervisor Mike Graham 
views Welton's "growth- 
oriented" stance as one of 
the biggest problems 
among the county's village 
boards. 

"Greed is the motivation 
for annexation," stated 
Graham. "Mayors and vil- 
lage boards should now 
pause. They are not only 
destroying farmlands and 
woodlands — they are de- 
stroying quality of life." 

He pointed out that the 
village boards see annexa- 
tion as a source of revenue 
and an opportunity to pro- 
mote growth without giv- 
ing the slightest regard to 
how that growth will affect 
schools. Graham thinks the 
school impact fees are a 
"major shortfall" with de- 
velopers. He maintains that 
the impact fees should be a 
minimum of twice the 
highest fees collected now. 

"It costs more to edu- 
cate students per year than 
what the schools are re- 
ceiving in impact fees," ar- 
gued Graham. "Where is 
the economics of this? Vil- 
lage boards and schools 
should unite to use all of 
their tools available to get 
the developers to pay all 
the costs of annexation. 
These developers are get- 
ting away with financial 
murder!" 

Don Skidmore, co-su- 
perintendent of Fox Lake 
Elementary District 114 
said the argument over 



Land 




David Richards, who has owned a farm on Delaney Rd. north of Rte. 173 for al- 
most 30 years, has already been forced into annexation by Wadsworth. He now 
worries that Zion will erect two power plants adjacent to his property. — Photo by 
school impact fees is multi- Sandy Bressner 



dimensional. He too ar 
gued that the real cost of education can be about $16,000 
per high school student, but he said it is really a question 
of what the market will bear. 

"I am sure the developers would not like to have any 
(impact fees)," commented Skidmore, "but they do offset 
the growth caused by developers." 

Skidmore pointed out that the school impact fees go 
all the way back to the 1970s. They were collected only to 
give school districts land for future school sites. Now, im- 
pact fees can also be used to fund new construction and 
major renovations of existing schools. 

When it comes to impact fees, schools in unincorpo- 
rated areas must cope with different procedures, funding 
levels and attitudes. 

Ron Paznin, superintendent of Ingleside's Big Hollow 
School District, said they have been working with the sur- 
rounding villages for years to raise impact fees. With fees 
ranging from $600 per single-family home in Volo to 
$3,200 per home at Valley Lakes in Round Lake, Paznin 
said it would be "wonderful If the state would have a uni- 
form code." / 

Lake County Board Rep. Larry Leafblad (R-Highland 



Lake) is chairman of Lake County's Building, Planning 
and Zoning Board. He said legislation was already 
launched to "empower the county to impose a uniform 
impact fee," but state lawmakers couldn't get it passed 
because of the lobbying efforts by the Home Builders of 
Illinois Association. 

Graham pointed out that a "set fee wouldn't happen" 
because the poorer school districts would benefit more 
than the richer ones. 

So, school impact fees remain a major bargaining chip 
in the land grab race, and the majority of schools have lit- 
tle or no negotiating power with developers. The Village 
of Volo is a prime example of how that chip can be uti- 
lized to lure developers — and their land — away from a 
neighboring town by setting lower impact fees. According 
to Volo village president Burnell Russell, a $900 per unit 
fee was established, making it less than Fox Lake's fee. 

Some villages, like Wadsworth, even go so far as to take a 
handling fee out of each impact payment received, thus de- 
pleting school funds even ftirther, while filling their own 
coffers, a practice which Meek found to be inconceivable. 

Please see LAND GRABBERS 130 



- • , . . ■ .• ■ - 



— *»»—.» 



.~. i...t_". rr . . . 



30 



Forefronts 



FROM PAGE 29 



Land grabbers 



Infrastructure impact fees are another tool that vil- 
lages use in their annexation conquests. Lake County 
Board Rep. Bonnie Thomson Carter (R-lngleside) noted 
that the proposed Holiday Park annexation into Fox 
Lake is a prime example of how infrastructure fees can 
be used as a dangling carrot to entice developers to latch 
on. Carter said the Village of Fox Lake, as an incentive to 
the Holiday Park developer to annex, has offered to pay 
$3 million in such fees. Carter went on to say that mu- 
nicipalities, and not the county, have it within their pow- 
er to force developers to pay for the financial impacts, 
but they don't out of fear that they will lose land to the 
neighboring village. 

"It's all about control," stated Carter. "They want to 
gain control before the next village gets it, so they sell out 
to the developer." 

"This is the developer's way to play municipality 
against municipality," said Leafblad, who believes a lot of 
the competition will go away if the municipalities allow 
the county's regional planning committee to help generate 
border agreements between villages. 

Forced annexation is another shot that villages can call 
if they want to appropriate unincorporated land. 

Carter, who does not approve of forced annexation or 
the threat of forced annexation, says the landowner should 
be the only one allowed to take the initiative to annex. 

"If someone voluntarily annexes, they believe the ad- 
vantages of that annexation," she stressed. "People who 
live in unincorporated areas want to stay there, and they 
should be left alone." 

David Richards, a lifelong Newport Township resi- 
dent, would agree with Carter. He was forced into annex- 
ation with Wadsworth in 1992. Richards, who is a farmer 
and owner of an excavation business, lives on a 30-acre 
farm on North Delaney Rd. Like his father before him, 



Richards has been farming for the better part of his life — 
some 35 years. 

For nearly 20 years, Richards' property was considered 
to be unincorporated Lake County. He said that was "just 
fine" with him. He did not have village taxes or village offi- 
cials dictating what he could or could not do with his land, 
and the "closest neighbor" wasn't close at all. 

In 1992, Richards, along with other unincorporated 
neighbors, found himself going to court to fight annexa- 
tion into Wadsworth. He said that he was never asked to 



It's all about control. 
They want to gain control 
before the next village gets 

it, so they sell out to 
the developer 





BONNIE THOMSON CARTER 
Lake County Board Representative 

become a part of Wadsworth when another neighbor start- 
ed a petition asking other unincorporated property owners 
to voluntarily annex into the village. 

At one point during the lawsuit, which was later 
dropped, Richards was approached by Zion to join them. 
The incentives offered were underground sewer services 
and city water. Wadsworth residents rely on well systems 
and septic tanks, which Meek said there is "no excuse for" 
anymore. 

"They promote environmental degradation," Meek 
stressed. "The only way to ensure safe drinking water and 
efficient waste disposal is through a central system." 

The benefits of being annexed into Zion were obvious, 
but Richards ultimately decided he had to consider the 
preservation of his farming lifestyle. However, from a 
farmer's point of view, Richards said Wadsworth's motto, 



"Village of Country Living," has a false ring to it. 

"They don't know what country living is," he com- 
mented. 

To outsiders looking to settle in the area, Richards said 
that Wadsworth may seem country and rural compared to 
neighboring communities like Gurnee, Waukegan and 
Zion. But, to a farmer like himself, it merely hints at a life 
of country simplicity because within every acre of open 
space, there lies a residential or commercial development 
waiting to be born. 

"Country living is when you have one house every cou- 
ple thousand feet," emphasized Richards. "Things have 
changed." 

Meek agreed that there has been a big change in plan- 
ning over the past 20 years. He pointed out that the 
changes are all about providing adequate public services 
to urban and unincorporated areas. 

"Urban development is supposed to be supported by 
urban services," noted Meek. "This is what gives strength 
to annexations." 

Meek also pointed out a couple of other benefits that 
stem from annexation include more intensive code en- 
forcement, higher levels of police and fire protection 
(which may result in lower insurance ratings) and local 
levels of competition, as opposed to county levels, for cap- 
ital projects. 

For the most part, according to Graham, Leafblad and 
Carter, the taxpayer appears to be the big loser in the 
race for land. They point out that development does not 
pay its way in regard to schools, roads, libraries, park 
districts and municipal services such as police and fire. 
Ultimately, the taxpayer ends up footing the bill for new 
development while municipalities lower their self-worth 
in tug-o-war games and the developers eagerly wait at 
the finish line to see who's going to cut them the best 
deal. 

"People can make a lot of speculations, but until the 
numbers arc in (from professional analysis and studies), 
you can't really choose the winners or losers in annexa : .- . , 
tion," concluded Meek. 




F 



0REFR0NTS 



LAKB COUNTY .PROGRESS 2000 



0REFR0NTS 

Lake County Progress 2000 takes a look at who is making a difference in Lake County and 
where the county is headed for the future. 

This special section begins with profiles of 10 of the most interesting people in Lake 
County this year as chosen by the editorial staff. Lakeland Newspapers feels the selection 
represents a cross section of occupations and goals. Some of the personalities maybe 
controversial, nevertheless, we feel these individuals are influencing the direction of Lake 
County. •* 

We welcome your comments, call (847) 223-8161. 



Founder: MR. Schroeder (1904-1986) 

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General Manager of Sales: Robert J. Schroeder 

Operations Manager/Executive Editor: Neal Tucker 

Managing Editor: Robert Warde 

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Classified Advertising Manager: Crystal Reed 

Circulation: Diane Terando and Kevin Wagner 



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Michael H. Babicz, Brenda Beitscher, Michael J. Bivona, Tim O'Donnell, 

Sandy Hartogh, Rob Backus and Angela D. Sykora. 

Cover photos: Sandy Bressner, Candace H. Johnson and 
Lynn Gunnarson Dahlstrom 



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Forefronts 



31 






Facing the prospect of 
ildren gaining access 
ult material, libraries 
consider Internet filtering 



Cindy Kiltian, chairwoman for Cook Memorial Library's internet policy committee, talks with Libertyville residents during 
an open forum of the Jan. 18 Library Board meeting. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 

art of the great promise of the Internet is said to be access. 
The Internet holds the potential of bringing information and 
knowledge to the masses in a grander and more explosive way 
than Henry Ford brought them the automobile. 




By Michael J. Bi von a 



If knowledge is power and the Internet is knowl- 
edge — power has a dark side for county libraries. Serving 
as a bastion of unfettered thought and ideas, public li- 
braries are finding that along with information and ideas, 
the Internet is delivering access to adult topics and, in 
some cases, pornography. 

Parents have searched for ways to keep such material 
away from their children. Some have turned to filtering, 
or using computer software to block access to offensive 
material. 

Although the topic of Internet filtering has just re- 
cently hit the national spotlight, Lake County libraries 
have been walking the tightrope for quite some time. 

After a Lake Villa parent realized her child had found 
pornographic photos on an Internet site' in October 1999, 
county libraries have frantically reviewed policies con- 
cerning Internet use. 

The question of whether or not to filter Internet com- 
puters in public libraries is central to the debate. An in- 
stalled filter is a software program that blocks out certain 
Internet sites deemed inappropriate by the installer of the 
software. 

For example, if a student using a computer without a 
filter does an Internet search for "breast cancer" for a 
school report, that student could be exposed to a number 
of advertisements for pornographic sites, with most con- 
taining controversial pictures. 

If that same student used a computer with a filter for 
the Internet, any site containing the word "breast" could 
possibly be blocked out, including the sites containing the 
needed information on breast cancer. 

Which system is better? The issue of freedom of 
speech is a big part of the Internet challenge. 

Fremont Public Library in Mundelein currently has 




Debbie Matiasek, of Ingleside, travels to 
Grayslake Library to meet her Internet needs. 
— Photo by Kirsten N. Hough 



the 



two computers that are used for Internet access, neither 
computer has a filter of any kind. 

"We do our best to meet the community's needs," 
Kathleen Callahan, Fremont library spokeswoman, said. 
"In terms of free speech, we do not favor one voice over 
any other voices." 

At a Cook Memorial Library Board meeting in Liber- 



tyville Jan. 18, a few residents spoke out on the subject of 
free speech. 

"Are you protecting your children against ideas?" Lib- 
ertyville resident Marshall Gordon asked while addressing 
a crowd adamant about wanting to filter the library's 
computers. "Any means of filtering is censorship. If you 1 
want to filter your children that is your right, but anybody 
wanting to filter is taking my right away." 

Groups protesting a lack of filters have also been 
heard across the county. 

Flyers from groups in Libertyville, Lake Zurich and 
Gurnee have been circulated to the public to let people 
know about the "dangers of pornography on the Inter- 
net." 

"There is no legitimate reason to oppose Internet fil- 
tering for both children and adults," one flyer written by a 
group from Lake Zurich stated. 

A group calling itself Community Library Educational 
Access Network (CLEAN) in Libertyville also sent flyers to 
their community, hoping to get a response — and a , 
.crowd— at the board meeting covering the issue. 

The flyer CLEAN circulated stated that the library's 
policy will "continue to allow your children to be exposed 
to explicit sexual images of extreme hard-core pornogra- 
phy at the wrong click of a mouse." 

Many other groups across the country have sent out 
newsletters concerning the Internet filtering issue. 

One group calling itself Morality in Media Inc. has 
circulated a large number of newsletters asking people to 
watch the new presidential candidates and notice 
whether or not they enforce the Federal obscenity laws. 

The newsletter states that citizens should write to 

Please see POWER/ 32 






-..:-^.tag?a^jKf<w»«M** > CMi ^ .. . ..*. .. m...- . 



32- 



Forefronts 



FROM PAGE 31 



Power 



candidates, asking them to enforce laws against 
pornography, without mentioning what those partic- 
ular laws are. 

One aspect of the issue is the actual location of 
computer terminals. Placing Internet computers in 
high-traffic areas, as opposed to a more private en- 
vironment, might curtail any "inappropriate" Inter- 
net use, library board members have suggested. 

According to Lynne Stainbrook, director of 
Warren -Newport Library in Gurnee, their comput- 
ers were originally in remote locations when the 
building first opened, but concern from parents 
over what could happen have influenced the li- 
brary's staff to move the computers closer to service 
desks. 

Some libraries have dealt with the issue by sim- 
ply stating in their policies that "inappropriate" In- 
ternet sites are not allowed. Residents favoring fil- 
ters claim that this policy is useless and that any- 
body wanting to view pornography will do so any- 
way. 

Some libraries are using filters in a few of their 





Any means of filtering 

is censorship. If you want 

to filter your children 

that is your right, but 

anybody wanting to filter is 

taking my right away 

MARSHALL GORDON 
Libertyville resident 

Internet computers. So far, libraries not using the 
filters for Internet computers have reported mini- 
mal problems. 

According to Fremont's Callahan, the library 
has not had any problems dealing with pornogra- 
phy in the library. 

Addressing the topic of children accidentally 
accessing pornographic material on the Internet, 
Stainbrook said, "I find it hard to believe that kids 
could 'accidentally' stumble over undesirable 
sites." 




Cook Memorial Library patrons listen to residents' arguments 
for and against an Internet filtering policy at the Jan. 18 Library 
Board meeting in Libertyville. — Photo by Sandy Bressner 



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This is your opportunity to take action! What's on your mind? I'm listening. 

Send or FAX your ideas to: 

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STATE SENATOR • 26TH DISTRICT 
Representing communities in Western Lake County 



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&***&**&'*+ w> "1* ^ '■■■ i ! 







As Lake County 

fcontmties to add homes and 

population, some unintended 

conseqtAemesJtdve also 

appeared 








-■*■"•*■£ 





ake County is a beautiful place to live. With parks and forest preserves, spacious lots in many 
municipalities — and of course, the lakes — the county offers a high quality of life to its residents. 
? But unlike the fabled Shangri-La, this beautiful Utopia is experiencing something no one in- 
tended — growing pains. 



How much has it grown? Consider the statistics: 

• In 1980, Lake County had a total population of 
440,372; in 1990 it had reached 516,418; in 1994, 559,406 
and in 1996, it had grown to 582,983. The Lake County 
Transportation Improvement Project (LCTIP) reports 
forecasts that call for an additional 250,000 people to 
move to the county by 2020. At that pace, the population 
will have almost doubled in 40 years. 

• The LCTIP, an effort jointly funded by the Illinois De- 
partment of Transportation and the Illinois State Tollway 
Authority, is currently seeking comments from the public 
regarding improvements to several state and U.S. high- 
ways. The group plans to make recommendations by the 
fall. 

• Despite efforts to solicit public opinion, people living 
near rtes. U.S. Kte.12, state Rte. 53, state Rte. 120 and state 
Rte. 83 have shown strong opposition to any widening or 
other improvements they believe will encourage addition- 
al traffic. Despite the opposition, motorists are often sit- 
ting still on many of these highways and others during 
rush hour. 

• Lake County Recorder Mary Ellen Vanderventer re- 
ports that a record 200,605 documents were recorded by 
her office in 1998. She predicted that pace would be 
equaled or beaten in 1999. She also reports that it took 
114 years to record the first one million documents, 21 
years for the second million, 1 1 years to reach three mil- 
lion and 7 years to reach four million. After just two years, 
Lake County is more than one-third of the way to record- 
ing five million documents. This is significant, in part be- 
cause many of these documents relate to building and de- 
velopment. 

• There were 4,984 dwelling permits issued in unincor- 
porated areas of the county during a 10-year period be- 



tween 1989 and November 30, 1999. Through September 
1998, there were 3,043 permits issued in incorporated and 
unincorporated areas of the county. 

A lot of activity, but what does it mean? Snarled traffic 
and higher taxes for services such as education, police 
and road Improvements. Residents who have lived here 
for decades say the extra people have made it noisier, 
more crowded and have taken away the rural feeling they 
came here to enjoy. 

One challenge is that it costs more to provide munici- 

By Robert Warde 

pal services to new development than that development 
brings in. One report by the American Farmland Trust's 
Farmland Information Center, says that it costs munici- 
palities about $1.12 to provide services to residential de- 
velopment for each $1 raised. 

For County Board Rep, Larry Leafblad (R-Highland 
Lake) who is chairman of the county's Building, Planning 
and Zoning committee says the growth has gone unbri- 
dled for one reason. "We developed Lake County before 
we planned Lake County," he sajd. 

The success of the county's forest preserve district to 
maintain open green space, as well as efforts on the part 
of municipalities to secure land for parks and green 
spaces when approving developments, has ensured that 
development will be concentrated in certain areas. 

Experts agree that it isn't so much a need to preserve 
open spaces, as it is providing infrastructure to meet the 
needs of residents. 

"The issue is not a loss of open space, it's more of a 
sacrifice issue. There are ways to retain open space," said 



Stuart Meek, a growth specialist with the American Plan- 
ning Commission in Chicago. 

"There has been a big change in planning over the 
past 20 years," Meek said. 

The focus now, he said, is on providing adequate pub- 
lic services. "Urban development is supposed to be sup- 
ported by urban services," Meek said. 

What is the answer? For some, its simple — stop ap- 
proving new developments permanently or temporarily, 
until infrastructure can be improved to meet the needs of 
county residents. 

For Mike Graham, Libertyville Township Supervisor, a 
no-growth policy is the only answer. Graham has been ac- 
tive and vocal for years about the effects of continued de- 
velopment, often citing statistics from the Farmland Trust 
report. 

Graham has found it an uphill battle. "We get a little 
bit timid when we walk off the beaten path," he said, re- 
ferring to efforts to curb or stop growth. Graham is en- 
couraged by members of the County Board. "They are.not 
afraid to speak up," he said. 

Graham sees one answer to providing an improved in- 
frastructure, let the developer pay for them. "Villages 
should tell developers to pay the full cost or (refuse the 
development). 

That is not so easy, either. If a developer cannot get 
the desired deal from one community, the company will 
often seek annexation — and a better deal — from the 
neighboring community. 

"The fear of loss is genuine. People fear losing their 
jobs, losing their wallets, losing a lot of things," Leafblad 



Please see GROWING 134 






■ 



34 



Forefronts 



FROM PAGE 33 



Growing 



said. "There are many good-intentioned people on village 
boards, but it is hard to take losing a development to an- 
other community." 

As an example, Leafblad cites Vernon Hills. The Vil- 
lage of Libertyville and Libertyville Township at times 
said "no" to developers, only to have them turn to Ver- 
non Hills for approval and annexation. According to 
Lake County statistics, in 1980, Vernon Hills had a pop- 
ulation of 9,027 and by 1996 it had grown to 17,792. 
Vernon Hills had a population of about 200 not too 
many years before 1980. 

For others, land-owners rights is also a factor. 

"It is impossible to stop the suburbanization of Lake 
County. People have a right to develop their property. It's 
part of the American dream," said Brad Burke, assistant to 
Gurnee Village Administrator Jim Hayner. 

"People who complain about development are part of 
the problem. When should we put up the fence — before or 
after you move in?" he asked. 

To Leafblad, who represents a large chunk of Avon 
Township, development in the northwest portion of the 
county is especially worrisome. 

"Municipalities in northwest Lake County are approv- 



ing development today 
without knowing the dam- 
age they have already inflict- 
ed, The traffic from some 
developments is not even 
here yet and they're devel- 
oping more," he said. 

By Leafblad's unofficial 
count, there are plans for . 
more than 3,000 single-fam- 
ily units in his sixth district 
alone. He said there were 
about 359 permits in the 
county building department 
for his district in 1999. 

Leafblad cites statistics 




People who complain 
about development are part 
of the problem. When should 

we put up the fence 
—before or after you move in? 




BRAD BURKE 

Assistant to 

Gitmee Village Administrator 



some of the items. "They all 
had to do with having monT 
people in the county," he 
said. 

Though this may all sound 
dire, there are some commu- 
nities such as the villages of 
Grayslake and Libertyville 
have very little land left for 
residential development. 
Both have set their sights on 
commercial development to 
fill in the remaining devel- 
opable acres. Gurnee has lit- 
tle land left for development 
of any kind. That may not 



used by planners that estimate a multiple of 10 car trips on help traffic gridlock, commercial development does con 



local roads and highways for each new home built. In his 
district, that would add 3,590 car trips each day to his dis- 
trict. "You're not going to be able to get through 
Hainesville or Grayslake or Hainesville Rd. Bacon Rd., Rte. 
60 or Fairfield Rd.," Leafblad fears. 

He believes that villages should ask developers to con- 
tribute more to the cost of building roads. 

Leafblad said that during a county goal-setting meeting 
held late last year, the County Board and staff members 
developed a list of 39 items, or goals, to work toward in 
2000. As he reflected on them, he realized that each one of 
them were the result of growth in the county. 

Some of the items included a larger county jail, addi- 
tional sheriffs deputies and 10 more legal secretaries as 



tribute tax dollars to municipalities and schools while us- 
ing a lower proportion of services. 

The LCTIP reports that 46 miles out of 74 of roadway 
improvements are either under construction or funded 
for the next five years. That'is expected to provide some 
relief. 

Leafblad believes that the only real answer is border 
agreements between municipalities. 

"The answer is planning," he said. Though he acknowl- 
edges that such efforts have failed in the past, a new effort 
is underway at the county level that Leafblad hopes will 
succeed. 

If it doesn't, Leafblad doesn't know what the future will 
hold. "It scares me to death," he said. 





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. II 



Forefronts 



Bieneman gets 
schools their due 




Paula Bieneman n 



Paula Bieneman, director of Alternative and Continu- 
ing Education Services (A.C.E.S.) for Round Lake School 
District 1 16, is the best kind of overachiever, always think- 
ing ahead to the future and how she can make a positive 
change in the life of a child. 

Recently, she was named director of grants manage- 
ment for her constant and successful efforts to secure funds 
for programs like anti-truancy and violence prevention. 

Before coming to District 1 16 in 1997, Bieneman was a 
teacher, dean of students and also headed an alternative 
school in Danville. 

Her passion for making a positive impact on at-risk youths evolved from her experiences 
as a teacher for a wilderness program, in Arizona called the Wagon Train. 

She lived and taught in the great outdoors for a year, helping young convicted felons real- 
ize a better way of life. 

Her dream is to one day develop her own wilderness-based residential program that inte- 
grates experimental education. 

Bieneman said she believes in setting high goals for herself. 

"The secret to success is to live deliberately, to have a passion, a dream, and to advance 
confidently in the direction of that dream, aware of its limits, but undaunted by them." 
—By Angela D. Sykora 




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(on the Victory Lakes Campus- off Grand Avenue) 



35 




Bauer not one to sit and gripe 



Round Lake Park Mayor Ila Bauer's philosophy on life and work 
was instilled In her from childhood. 

"My parents used to tell me it isn't right to just sit and gripe 
about something." 

"You need to be part of the solution instead of complaining 
about the problem," said Bauer. 

In that respect, her interest in local government was bom. 

Before seeking political office, Bauer was a business education 
teacher at Round Lake High School for over 12 years. 

From 1992 to 1993, Bauer was a village trustee. The transition 
to mayor was inevitable. 

"I have made a personal commitment. I've said to many peo- 
ple, I'll be the best mayor this village has ever had." 

• Bauer is currently working to get the Family Resource Center 
up and running. The center, which has been awarded a $100,000 
state grant, will benefit the entire Round Lake area and provide ser- 
vices to the growing minority population. — By Angela D. Sykora 

Please see NOTABLES / 36 




.^"^N. 




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36- 



Forefronts 









FROM PAGE 35 



Notables 



LeMere styles a community 

A barber by original profession, Claude LeMere is shaping the 
look of Antioch instead of perfecting hair styles. 

The 54-year-old son of 07-year-oid George and 85-year-old 
Ruthe, both who are living under Claude's care, has been serving 
as community development director for the Village of Antioch 
since July 1993. 

"In the near future, I want to concentrate on building a tax base 
for village residents, both industrial and commercial," LeMere 
said. "I want to continue to expand that base for the future." 

Starting his civic involvement as parade announcer and Antioch 
Centennial Celebration Special Events Chairman, LeMere has 
worked with village officials, businesses, industry and civic organi- 
zations providing support for various improvements within the village. 

Completing the William E. Brook Memorial Wetland Sanctuary and Entertainment Center is 
a major focus for LeMere. The project is scheduled to be finished this summer. 

During LeMere's tenure as community development director, the village's downtown store 
vacancy rate has dropped from 38 percent in 1993 to 3 percent. 

A new industrial park and large commercial development are projects LeMere is working on. 
Serving as liaison to the state, county and local governments, chambers of commerce, civic groups, 
manager of the downtown business area, coordinating special events and overseeing all com- 
mercial and industrial development within the village keeps LeMere busy. — By Michael H. Babicz 




Shooting' for another fifty? 



Steve Young 



If you have ever been to an Antioch football or basketball 
game, chances are you've seen Steve Young, 

In fact, he hasn't missed a single game in 51 years. 

The 68-year-old Young has been covering Antioch sports as 
a photographer since his freshman year of high school. 

An Antioch native and Johnson Motors retiree, Young has 
worn out two different cameras from just simply taking too 
many pictures. 

"I love it," Young said of his photographing. "Seeing the kids 
do well and seeing the look on their faces when they see their 
picture, it does your heart well." 

Young is known by student athletes and their families, 
coaches, referees and faculty all over Lake County as a very 
courteous individual, a trait he displays by giving everyone he 
passes a piece of gum. 

"I've been giving it out for about fifty years now. I think I 've 
spent around $10,000 over the years," Young explained. 

When asked if retirement was coming anytime soon, 
Young responded, "I'm going to keep doing this as along as 



I'm able. I'd like to make it another 50 years. Besides, the kids won't let me quit." — By Michael J. 
Bivona 



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' 



Forefronts 



37 



•fl 



m 



\ 



The year that was,,, 




Round Lake Area • 

• A bomb scare at the high school caused the evacuation of 1,000 stu- 
dents in the middle of taking their final exams. 

Lake Villa/Lindenhurst 

• The Lake Villa District Library works on installing internet filters af- 
ter a child is exposed to pornographic material. A variety of opinions 
are expressed at the Village of Lake Villa board meeting, with the ma- 
jority of people expressing their anger with people using tax dollars to 
view pornography. 

Fox Lake .- •; ••*•• ■ : 

• Fox Lake District 1 14 hopes for approval of a $12.3 million building bond 
referendum. The major focus is for expansion at Stanton School. Plans call 
for 24 additional classrooms for the school in the project's first phase. But 
voters would reject the referendum bid, falling short by 69 votes. 

Grayslake 

• Mayor Pat Carey and Police Chief Larry Herzog attempt to end gun 
shows at the Lake County Fairgrounds. The pair cite danger in having 
too many guns in one place at one time. The village uses a request by the 
Fairgrounds board for additional parking spaces as leverage. 

Gufnee : • 

• Dutch elm disease invaded the east side of the village, resulting in official 
orders for residents to quickly remove affected trees from their properties. 

Wadsworth - 

• Controversy erupts when the mayor tries to have her attorney sit 
on the board beside her. Police are consulted during a recess, but 
the attorney finally sits elsewhere. 



Wiauconda ■ • ••• - 

• Four students are expelled for their roles in a bomb threat at Wauconda 
HighSchool. 

Antioch * • 

• Antioch Community High School (ACHS) administration responds to 
community questions raised about safety and security following the 
Columbine High School tragedy. A sophomore student who allegedly 
made written and verbal statements threatening another student was 
charged with disorderly conduct. 

Libertyvilie ;■• 

• Indeck-Libertyville LLC, began presenting its case for a peaker power 
plant during the village board's on-going public hearings on the matter. 

Mundelein 

• After three months of presentations, public forums and debates, the 
village board voted to grant the tax rebate that would bring Cub Foods 
back to Mundelein. Supervalu, Cub Foods' parent company, estimated 
that they would be paying around $250,000 per year in state sales tax. 
The village will give a percentage of its portion of the sales tax back to 
the store— up to $800,000. 



Lake County Is The Greatest 

County In Illinois! 

I Am Proud To live Here! 

SENATOR ADELINE GEO-KARIS 
ASSISTANT MAJORITY LEADER 

31st District, Illinois Legislature 




Phyllis Bucar, Western Legislative Aide 

884 Main Street, Antioch 60002 

Mon., Wed., Fri. 

(847)395-3100 



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Complete summer brochure comes out In mid-March (Including camp 

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summer brochure. Call us at 223-7529 for more Information. 





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Forefronts. 



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Community Education 
Diagnostic Services 



Emergency & Trauma Services 

Employee Assistance 

Extended Care 

Fitness 

Flight For Life Helicopter 

Home Health Care 

Home Medical Equipment 

Intensive Care 

Laboratory Services 

Mother/Baby Health 



Medical Imaging 

Nutritional Therapy Services 

Occupational Medicine 

Oncology Services 

Orthopaedics 

Outpatient Diagnostic 

Services 

Pain Management 

Pastoral Care 

Pharmacy 



Pulmonary Rehabilitation 

Rehabilitation Services :<?-. 

Respite Care 

Sleep Disorders 

Sports Medicine 

Surgery 

Wellness 

Women's Health 

...and much more! 



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Laura Biangoni^MD 

Board-Certified in Pediatric Medicine 



Erin G. I) avis ^ MD 

Board-Certified in Internal Medicine 



CENTEGRA PRIMARY CARE 

935 Skidmore Drive •• Antioch, IL 

(847) 838-1470 





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(gCENTEGRA 

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Memorial Medical Center 

Woodstock. 
815/338-2500 

Northern Illinois Medical Center 

McHenry 

815/344-5000